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Poynter.
  • Janet Mock won’t ‘be thrown into a corner as the trans correspondent’ at Marie Claire

    Marie Claire readers are about to see a new name in the magazine’s masthead, one they might already be familiar with. Janet Mock, an author and former editor at People.com, was first in the pages of Marie Claire in 2011, when Marie Claire published the story of her journey as a transgender woman.

    Mock will join the magazine as a contributing editor, Marie Claire announced this week. Her first piece, a personal account of the women and girls she’s met while traveling the country on a tour for her book “Redefining Realness,” is scheduled to appear in the print version of the magazine in the fall.

    Mock in 2011. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles)

    “I’ll also give my perspective on beauty, and pop culture, and politics, and not just be thrown into a corner as the trans correspondent,” Mock said in a phone interview. Editor-in-Chief Anne Fulenwider said that Mock will be writing about her own experiences but won’t be limited to them. She was drawn to Mock, she said, because she’s a “phenomenal writer, speaker and thinker.”

    “I’m certainly not discounting her transgender identity; I think that’s really important and that’s what makes it so topical right now and what’s given it a lot of attention,” Fulenwider said, “but at the center of this is the story of a woman finding herself, and those are the stories that really resonate with young women.”

    Mock writes in “Redefining Realness” that her success has resulted in what she calls “survivor guilt.” Since the publication of the essay in Marie Claire in 2011, Mock has become a national figure in the transgender movement.… Read more

  • Pew’s Alan Murray will edit Fortune

    Alan Murray will leave his post as the president of the Pew Research Center to become the new editor of Fortune, Fortune announced Tuesday. Current Fortune Editor Andy Serwer “is leaving Time Inc.,” the release says. Murray left The Wall Street Journal to run Pew in 2012.

    Pew “will promptly begin a search for the new president” of the research center, Pew Charitable Trusts President and CEO Rebecca Rimel tells Poynter in a statement.

    Murray’s “experience at The Wall Street Journal gave him a keen understanding of evolving media trends, and he also brought to the job a high level of enthusiasm and appreciation for the unique attributes of the Center,” Rimel says. “His work over the last year and a half has positioned the Center well for the future. We wish him well at Fortune, a global organization with a reputation for high quality journalism.”
    Full release:

    (New York, July 22, 2014) – Alan Murray has been named Editor of Fortune, it was announced today by Todd Larsen, Executive Vice President, Time Inc. and Norman Pearlstin

    Read more
  • Circulation revenue rises at Gannett’s local papers

    Good morning. Here are 10 (OK, perhaps slightly more than 10) media stories.

    1. Gannett had a good second quarter: Broadcast revenue was “almost 88 percent higher in the quarter compared to the second quarter last year.” Publishing advertising revenue fell about 5 percent; circulation was roughly flat, and “At local domestic publishing sites, home delivery circulation revenue was up in the quarter due, in part, to strategic pricing actions associated with enhanced content.” (Gannett)
    2. Washington Post fights the “wonk wars”: The Washington Post’s new “Storyline” project is “dedicated to the power of stories to help us understand complicated, critical things,” Editor Jim Tankersley writes. (The Washington Post) | Michael Calderone takes a look: “It’s unlikely The Post would’ve launched a project like Storyline a few years ago.” (HuffPost) | Tankersley writes that as a college student he was inspired by Richard Read‘s 1998 series about french fries: “Those stories brought the crisis home in a way no textbook or straight news piece could, because at each step, they showed how global trends touched people’s lives and livelihoods.” (The Oregonian)
    3. Why corrupt politicians should avoid Vermont: Vermont has the best-covered legislature in the country, and California has the worst, Pew finds.
    Read more

Saundra Smokes

The Post-Standard

Herald-Journal

Herald American

"I see through the eyes of a Christian, an African-American, a woman, a journalist, an aunt, a daughter. Someone who feels at ease with all kinds of people. I try to bring that varied perspective to my columns," says Saundra Smokes.

"Sandy," as she is known to friends and colleagues, became the first person of color in the history of the Syracuse Newspapers to sit on the Herald-Journal's editorial board in 1985. She also is the first person of color to write a full-time opinion column for the newspapers.

She has won numerous honors and awards as her career climbed from reporter to local columnist, to the editorial board, to syndicated columnist, and then back to The Post Standard as an editorial writer, copy editor, and editorial board member.

Upon her return to the editorial board in 2003, she initiated the series, "Taxpayers Held Hostage," which won a first place community service award from the New York State Publishers Association. Sandy also received awards for commentary (editorials and columns) in 1993 and 1994 from the Associated Press.

A Syracuse native, Sandy started writing while in elementary school and continued with soap operas about her middle-school classmates. After graduation, she attended the University of Buffalo. In 1978, she joined the Herald-Journal as a "copy kid," an employee who does all sorts of odd jobs in the newsroom. Soon, however, she began writing feature stories. She was promoted to reporter covering city and county news, and later, she became a copy editor.

In November 1992, a column on the outcome of the first trial of Los Angeles police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney King, was picked up by newspapers nationwide. The following year, Sandy began writing a regular opinion column for the Syracuse Newspapers.

Seven months after she began writing the local column, United Features Syndicate selected Sandy to write a column they would syndicate across the United States. Twenty-two newspapers picked up her work each week for eight years. In 2003, she returned to The Post-Standard to write editorials and work on the copy desk.

Her awards include the 1998 Urban League Harriet Tubman Award, the Ann Felton Memorial Award and Community Service Award from the Syracuse Chapter of the NAACP, Citizen of the Year from Omega Psi Phi fraternity at Syracuse University, the Great Leader Award from the Onondaga County Political Women?s Caucus, the Marjorie Dowdell Fortitude Award from Delta Sigma Theta fraternity at SU, and the Pit Bull Award from the Greater Syracuse Communications Group. She also received the Syracuse Press Club's Selwyn Kershaw Professional Stands Award.

Sandy also writes plays, including "A Tribute to Motown" and "In Our Own Backyard," and a video drama, "Daddy's Home," which won a Cable Ace award. --Joseph A. Porcello

 

 

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 08 August 2012 20:44 )
 

"Give light and the people will find their own way."
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Wall of Distinction


Luther F. "Gus" Bliven

The Post-Standard

Luther F. "Gus" Bliven scored a number of news "scoops" during his distinguished 68-year newspaper career with The Post-Standard where he became best-known for his work as a political writer and the "dean" of Albany legislative correspondents.

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