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Poynter.
  • The people you meet on West Florissant (and what they think about the press)

    It’s hot on Thursday night, the heavy Missouri humidity back after an unusually cool summer. Up and down West Florissant Avenue in Ferguson, Missouri, people wipe the sweat from their heads, faces and necks.

    Tammy Norman, though, is not dressed for a protest. She walks up to the roped-off area in a parking lot where CNN’s set up under a white tent, with tangles of cords and cameras and men standing like guards outside. She holds her phone and a disposable camera.

    St. Louis resident Tammy Norman came out Thursday night to get a photo with Anderson Cooper.

    “I see exactly who I came to see,” she says as she moves closer. Her hair’s pulled back in a neat ponytail and she wears a black and white houndstooth dress.… Read more

  • How Argus Radio livestreams from Ferguson

    If you’ve watched livestream night-vision footage of police clashing with protesters in Ferguson, Missouri, or chanting, marching protesters, you probably saw at least some of that from Argus Radio.

    But the independent, digital, volunteer-operated St. Louis, Missouri, station wasn’t livestreaming before a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown on Saturday, Aug. 9. A few days after that, their equipment arrived in the mail. Argus Radio’s Mustafa Hussein planned to offer livestreaming concerts to help independent musicians. When he saw what was happening in Ferguson, he grabbed the new gear, came to Ferguson on the night of Wednesday, August 13th, and started streaming.

    Hussein has made news already. Huffington Post’s Michael Calderone wrote about Hussein and his operation. The Washington Post’s Andrea Peterson wrote about Hussein getting threatened by police while covering Ferguson.… Read more

  • HuffPost’s Ferguson Fellow: ‘This is huge for me’

    Stewart.

    Mariah Stewart hasn’t always been sure about her future in journalism. She remembers calling her mom in tears on her way to a feature writing class late last year, unsure if she’d be able to finish journalism school. She was having trouble finding a beat she was passionate about, and it was making her anxious.

    That changed when she began reporting on the shooting of Michael Brown. Stewart, a 23-year-old freelance journalist who graduated from Lindenwood University in May, started covering Brown’s shooting days after it occurred in Ferguson, Missouri, without any financial backing because “it was news,” she said.

    This week, the story suddenly turned into a yearlong assignment for Stewart after she was named the recipient of The Huffington Post’s Ferguson Fellowship. … Read more


Saundra Smokes

The Post-Standard

Herald-Journal

Herald American

"I see through the eyes of a Christian, an African-American, a woman, a journalist, an aunt, a daughter. Someone who feels at ease with all kinds of people. I try to bring that varied perspective to my columns," says Saundra Smokes.

"Sandy," as she is known to friends and colleagues, became the first person of color in the history of the Syracuse Newspapers to sit on the Herald-Journal's editorial board in 1985. She also is the first person of color to write a full-time opinion column for the newspapers.

She has won numerous honors and awards as her career climbed from reporter to local columnist, to the editorial board, to syndicated columnist, and then back to The Post Standard as an editorial writer, copy editor, and editorial board member.

Upon her return to the editorial board in 2003, she initiated the series, "Taxpayers Held Hostage," which won a first place community service award from the New York State Publishers Association. Sandy also received awards for commentary (editorials and columns) in 1993 and 1994 from the Associated Press.

A Syracuse native, Sandy started writing while in elementary school and continued with soap operas about her middle-school classmates. After graduation, she attended the University of Buffalo. In 1978, she joined the Herald-Journal as a "copy kid," an employee who does all sorts of odd jobs in the newsroom. Soon, however, she began writing feature stories. She was promoted to reporter covering city and county news, and later, she became a copy editor.

In November 1992, a column on the outcome of the first trial of Los Angeles police officers accused of beating motorist Rodney King, was picked up by newspapers nationwide. The following year, Sandy began writing a regular opinion column for the Syracuse Newspapers.

Seven months after she began writing the local column, United Features Syndicate selected Sandy to write a column they would syndicate across the United States. Twenty-two newspapers picked up her work each week for eight years. In 2003, she returned to The Post-Standard to write editorials and work on the copy desk.

Her awards include the 1998 Urban League Harriet Tubman Award, the Ann Felton Memorial Award and Community Service Award from the Syracuse Chapter of the NAACP, Citizen of the Year from Omega Psi Phi fraternity at Syracuse University, the Great Leader Award from the Onondaga County Political Women?s Caucus, the Marjorie Dowdell Fortitude Award from Delta Sigma Theta fraternity at SU, and the Pit Bull Award from the Greater Syracuse Communications Group. She also received the Syracuse Press Club's Selwyn Kershaw Professional Stands Award.

Sandy also writes plays, including "A Tribute to Motown" and "In Our Own Backyard," and a video drama, "Daddy's Home," which won a Cable Ace award. --Joseph A. Porcello

 

 

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 08 August 2012 20:44 )
 

"Paramount among the responsibilities of a free press is the duty to prevent any part of the government from deceiving the people and sending them off to distant lands to die of foreign fevers and foreign shot and shell."--Hugo L Black, Associate Justice, US Supreme Court (Ruling that upheld the press’s right to publish the Pentagon Papers)

Wall of Distinction


Paul Ennis

WIXT

WSTM

Paul Ennis came to Syracuse as the first member of his family to enroll in college. Good teachers in the public schools of his hometown, Port Chester, New York, had given him encouragement and approval as a writer, so he entered Syracuse University knowing he would somehow work with language.
Read more...Link

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