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  • Today in Media History: World War I news stories described the end of the Red Baron

    It didn’t take long for newspapers to print the news that German World War I fighter pilot Manfred von Richthofen (aka the Red Baron) was shot down and killed in France on April 21, 1918.

    The April 22, 1918 edition of The (New York) Evening World published a short article and front page image of Richthofen. More information came the following day:

    “LONDON, April 23 — Further details were received today of the death of Baron Rittmeister von Richthofen, leader of the German ‘Flying Circus,’ just credited by Berlin with eighty victories.

    ….This swarm of raiders appeared suddenly on Sunday over the British lines near the Somme Valley, and after an attack on some British planes, a general fight started, in which fifty or more airplanes were engaged. It raged over such a wide air area no one could see the details, but it is known Richthofen was flying not higher than 150 feet when his machine crashed….”

    Image-NYW

    Image-Break 760

    The following background information about Richthofen’s airplane comes from a Wired article titled, “How the Red Baron’s Knockoff Aircraft Became the First Great Warplane”:

    “Though the Allies won the war and the glory, the Germans gave us one of the most famous airplanes of the Great War. The Fokker Dr.1 triplane, flown by one of history’s great fighter pilots, is among the most recognizable aircraft of the early twentieth century and it played a significant role in launching dogfighting as a new form of combat.
    ….The Fokker Dr.1 emphasized the need for maneuverability in air-to-air combat, something that persists to this day in the development of the latest fighter jets, including the F-35 Lighting. It also marks the first plane famous for air-to-air combat — famous enough to end up in Peanuts along with the Red Baron, the arch-nemesis of Snoopy and his Sopwith Camel biplane.”

    Periscope Film archive has compiled a video of newsreel and other footage about the Red Baron:

    Read more
  • Pulitzer Prize wins spark celebration, contemplation

    Good morning. Here are nine media stories.

    1. A cause for triumph

      The winners of the 99th Pulitzer Prizes were announced Monday, commemorating some of the year's best journalism. Here's a list of the winners, from Kristen Hare. (Poynter) | Katie Hawkins-Gaar took a look at how newsrooms celebrated. (Poynter) | More women won individual prizes this year than in the last five, Lauren Klinger notes. (Poynter) | Al Tompkins talked to prize recipients from previous years about what it feels like to win. (Poynter) | Bloomberg News was a first-time winner, James Warren writes. (Poynter) | The winner for breaking news photography was no surprise, according to Kenny Irby. (Poynter) | A small newsroom was rewarded for hard work. (Poynter)

    2. A pause for reflection

      Amid the Pulitzer excitement, several articles took a step back and put the prizes in perspective. For the photo staff of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, which won for its coverage of the events precipitated by the police shooting of Michael Brown, the prize is bittersweet. Said Post-Dispatch photographer Robert Cohen: "It’s sad to win for a story that caused such loss in our community." (Poynter) | Poynter's Rick Edmonds notes that traditional treatments dominated the prizes, despite the ongoing digital media transformation. (Poynter) | Journalists should look to their work, rather than prizes, for validation, Jack Shafer writes. (Politico) | The Washington Post's Erik Wemple calls for a new prize category: Brevity. (The Washington Post) | Pulitzer wins are sometimes accompanied by very bad news, David Dunlap writes. (New York Times) | One of the Pulitzer winners from the Daily Breeze took a job in public relations to help pay the bills. (Slate)

    3. Wall Street Journal gets a facelift

      The Wall Street Journal's new website is live. Some early notes: more whitespace, retooled navigation and no infinite scroll. (Wall Street Journal) | "At the Journal, the promise of a web relaunch has been percolating in the newsroom for at least the past two years." (Capital New York)

    4. Outlets get sneak peek at Clinton opposition research

      The New York Times, The Washington Post and Fox News have made agreements to get an early look at "opposition research on Hillary Clinton" drawn from Peter Schweizer's forthcoming book: "Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of How and Why Foreign Governments and Businesses Helped Make Bill and Hillary Rich." There's "no financial aspect" to the arrangement, Washington Post National Editor Cameron Barr says. (Politico)

    5. Dr. Oz will address detractors on air

      On Thursday, Dr. Mehmet Oz will respond on "The Dr. Oz Show" to criticism from doctors who sent a letter to Columbia University charging that Oz demonstrated "an egregious lack of integrity by promoting quack treatments." (The New York Times) | On Sunday, CNN's Brian Stelter reported that Oz was planning a special episode to address the criticism. (CNN)

    6. 'Mobilegeddon' begins

      Today, Google is implementing a tweak that favors websites that "meet its criteria for mobile display," Mark Bergen writes. This latest change, dubbed "Mobilegeddon," probably isn't as dramatic as it sounds, though. "While the mobile-friendly change is important, we still use a variety of signals to rank search results,” a Google spokeswoman wrote in an email. “The intent of the search query is still a very strong signal — so if a page with high quality content is not mobile-friendly, it could still rank high if it has great content for the query." (Re/code)

    7. Washington Post reporter accused of spying

      On Monday, The Washington Post reported that Tehran bureau chief Jason Rezaian had been formally charged with espionage by Iranian authorities. (The Washington Post) | Washington Post Executive Editor Martin Baron called the charges "absurd and despicable." (WashPostPR) | The Committee to Protect Journalists also voiced its disapproval. (CPJ)

    8. Front page of the day, selected by Kristen Hare

      A dramatic front-page photograph from informação in Lisbon, Portugal. (Courtesy Kiosko)
      pt_i.750
       

    9. Job moves:

      Alexander Kaufman is now business editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was an associate editor there. (@AlexCKaufman) | Sharon Carty is now editor in chief at Yahoo Autos. Previously, she was editor in chief of AOL’s Autoblog. (Yahoo) | Mark Spain is now co-anchor at WSET in Lynchburg, Virginia. Previously, he was an anchor and reporter at WTEV-WAWS in Jacksonville. (TV Spy) | Paul Blake is now a news writer at BBC Washington. Previously, he was a freelance producer. (Email) | Job of the day: Gizmodo is looking for a news editor. Get your résumés in! (Gizmodo) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org.

    Corrections? Tips? Please email me: bmullin@poynter.org. Would you like to get this roundup emailed to you every morning? Sign up here.

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  • Career Beat: Alexander Kaufman named business editor at HuffPost

    Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

    • Alexander Kaufman is now business editor at The Huffington Post. Previously, he was an associate editor there. (Huffington Post)
    • Sharon Carty is now editor in chief at Yahoo Autos. Previously, she was editor in chief of AOL’s Autoblog. (Yahoo)
    • Mark Spain is now co-anchor at WSET in Lynchburg, Virginia. Previously, he was an anchor and reporter at WTEV-WAWS in Jacksonville. (TV Spy)
    • Paul Blake is now a news writer at BBC Washington. Previously, he was a freelance producer. (Email)

    Job of the day: Gizmodo is looking for a news editor. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

    Read more

Nevart Apikian

The Post-Standard

A chance assignment, plus an opportunity to cover entertainers and their shows during her first year as a professional journalist, resulted in Nevart Apikian's lifelong career writing about music, musicians, actors, movies and theater.
Nevart, a Syracuse native, took her first job at the Sullivan County Evening News in Monticello soon after graduating from Syracuse University. She spent a year covering stories about the courts, county government, town meetings and other news events. But, she also wrote about the entertainers who played the numerous Catskill Mountain resort hotels around Monticello.

After a year, she returned to Syracuse and a reporting job with The Post-Standard. As she recalls, "many assignments later, I covered the touring First Drama Quartet in (Bernard) Shaw's 'Don Juan in Hell.' This led to my becoming the theater and movie critic of the newspaper for more than 25 years."

During that time, Nevart found Syracuse "rich in music, theater and art. I was fortunate in being able to write about the Syracuse Symphony, Syracuse Opera and Syracuse Stage, and the many excellent community theaters, and about television. I recall fondly the former Lyric Circus in Skaneateles and the Pompeian Players."

One of her most interesting experiences, says Nevart, a first-generation American, is the trip she took to Armenia, where her parents were born. During the trip she visited Yerevan, the capital of that small country which lies in the shadow of Mt. Ararat near the Black Sea. The journey also gave her an opportunity to practice the Armenian she learned as a child in Syracuse.

Nevart is a past president of Theta Sigma Phi, a journalism honorary now known as Women in Communications, and of the Central New York Chapter of the National League of American Pen Women. She also is a member of Civic Morning Musicals and the Trip Committee of the Everson Museum of Art.

In looking back on her career in the newsroom, she notes the changes from a time when reporters and writers worked to the click-clack and bell ringing of typewriters to the almost silent word processors of present day computers. She says she is grateful for all of the unique stories she covered and interesting people she met. An example of her unique assignments is among Nevart's prized souvenirs -- a photo of her on an elephant, taken when she covered a circus visit to Syracuse. --Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:15 )
 
"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."
--Thomas Jefferson

Wall of Distinction


Andy Brigham

WIXT

WTVH (WHEN-TV)

Club President: 1986

He was more than once likened to Mike Wallace of TV's "60 Minutes" and early in his career, the Syracuse New Times cited him as "the best investigative reporter in Syracuse."
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