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  • New Pew study finds most people OK trading privacy for valued digital services

    The Pew Research Center this morning released the last of seven studies on where digital life is headed in the next decade — this one focused on privacy concerns.

    A survey of experts revealed split opinion on whether there will be a trusted privacy-rights infrastructure in place by 2025.  But there was strong consensus on both sides that for right now people accept a degree of tracking as a fair trade for getting services, typically for free, that they value and use daily.

    What’s the implication for media, with many outlets betting the franchise these days that they can develop higher priced advertising as they harvest data on what you prefer and perhaps where you are?

    That is not addressed directly in the report, Pew director of Internet research Lee Rainie told me in a phone interview, but the implications are clear.

    “The Internet of things,” will up the ante on privacy, Rainie said.  Read more

  • As Serial adjourns, the Internet gives a collective shriek

    Serial, the podcasting phenomenon that launched a thousand hot takes, has just ended its first season. If you could call what happened this morning an ending.

    Before you read any further, you should know that this article contains spoilers. Not any spoilers of the definitive, open-and-shut-case kind, but rather a hair-tearing, foot-stomping reaction to a months-long murder mystery that we’ve all become hugely invested in. Here’s what Serial listeners had to say about the season one finale:

    Seriously, #serial?! @serial

    — Jessa (@JessaH) December 18, 2014

    @Tomboladiablo @serial ahhhhh

    — John Whaite (@JohnWhaiteBakes) December 18, 2014

    FINAL @serial AGHHHH

    — Marketing Amor (@MarketingAmor) December 18, 2014

    So @serial what was the point of that…..

    — Böb Orr (@Bob_Orr) December 18, 2014

    Well @serial that was unsatisfying, but it HAS to be. Real life doesn't have a season finale.

    — Kitty Kat (@Wickedlydeeper) December 18, 2014

    Aaaaahhhh WTF @serial #cliffhanger

    — Jessica Erin Bowers (@JessicaEBowers) December 18, 2014

    What am I supposed to do with this conclusion?

    Read more
  • Journalist on Cuba: ‘My mom has been waiting and waiting and waiting’

    Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

    1. A more personal look at the Cuba story

      On Wednesday, Maria Carrillo, a senior editor at the Houston Chronicle, spent a lot of time on the phone with her mother, a Cuban exile. "I am an American, born here, raised here, never been to the island where my parents were born. But those are my people, as surely as if I'd toddled into the surf at Varadero or spent summer nights along the Malecón. And this has all been painful to watch. We are separated — by that embargo, by politics, by distance, by time. We've been waiting and waiting and waiting." (Houston Chronicle) | CNN's Patrick Oppmann is based in Havana. "Church bells ringing in Havana. Covering history..." (@CNN_Oppmann)

    2. ProPublica is watching you, China

      Since mid-November, ProPublica has been monitoring accessibility to international news sites in China. "Of the 18 in our test, 9 are currently blocked." (ProPublica) | It's getting even harder to report there.

    Read more

Nevart Apikian

The Post-Standard

A chance assignment, plus an opportunity to cover entertainers and their shows during her first year as a professional journalist, resulted in Nevart Apikian's lifelong career writing about music, musicians, actors, movies and theater.
Nevart, a Syracuse native, took her first job at the Sullivan County Evening News in Monticello soon after graduating from Syracuse University. She spent a year covering stories about the courts, county government, town meetings and other news events. But, she also wrote about the entertainers who played the numerous Catskill Mountain resort hotels around Monticello.

After a year, she returned to Syracuse and a reporting job with The Post-Standard. As she recalls, "many assignments later, I covered the touring First Drama Quartet in (Bernard) Shaw's 'Don Juan in Hell.' This led to my becoming the theater and movie critic of the newspaper for more than 25 years."

During that time, Nevart found Syracuse "rich in music, theater and art. I was fortunate in being able to write about the Syracuse Symphony, Syracuse Opera and Syracuse Stage, and the many excellent community theaters, and about television. I recall fondly the former Lyric Circus in Skaneateles and the Pompeian Players."

One of her most interesting experiences, says Nevart, a first-generation American, is the trip she took to Armenia, where her parents were born. During the trip she visited Yerevan, the capital of that small country which lies in the shadow of Mt. Ararat near the Black Sea. The journey also gave her an opportunity to practice the Armenian she learned as a child in Syracuse.

Nevart is a past president of Theta Sigma Phi, a journalism honorary now known as Women in Communications, and of the Central New York Chapter of the National League of American Pen Women. She also is a member of Civic Morning Musicals and the Trip Committee of the Everson Museum of Art.

In looking back on her career in the newsroom, she notes the changes from a time when reporters and writers worked to the click-clack and bell ringing of typewriters to the almost silent word processors of present day computers. She says she is grateful for all of the unique stories she covered and interesting people she met. An example of her unique assignments is among Nevart's prized souvenirs -- a photo of her on an elephant, taken when she covered a circus visit to Syracuse. --Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:15 )
 
"Free speech carries with it some freedom to listen."
Warren E Burger, Chief Justice, US Supreme Court
Majority opinion in 7-1 ruling that prohibited the closing of courtrooms to the press, 2 Jul 80

Wall of Distinction


E.R. Vadeboncoeur

WSYR Radio and TV

Syracuse Journal

Mention the name E.R. Vadeboncoeur and it's his radio news broadcasts and Election Night commentaries that come to mind for many longtime Central New Yorkers. Long forgotten is that "Curly," as he was known to his friends, started out to be a newspaperman.

Read more...Link

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