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Poynter.
  • White House correspondents unveil proposals to loosen presidential press control

    The White House Correspondents’ Association unveiled a set of “principles and practices” Saturday in search of “meaningful and consistent access to the President and his or her aides whenever and wherever they conduct the public’s business.”

    The principles and a set of proposed practices reflect a growing frustration with the administration of President Barack Obama and a sense by those who cover the White House daily that they are increasingly kept in the dark.

    That frustration is part and parcel of clear trends of successive administrations. Inevitably they believe they can manage their “message” and images of a president more effectively by avoiding traditional media, keeping even the frequently pedestrian under wraps and circumventing the mainstream press through their own use of social media or many new outlets. Read more

  • Flags, fireworks, freedom of the press and an eagle: Here are 5 Fourth of July fronts

    Sunday fronts will likely be bursting with images of fireworks from around the country, but newspapers are celebrating the Fourth of July today, too. Here’s a quick collection of fronts, via Newseum, that shows how:

    The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi led the holiday calling out the politicians who haven’t yet responded to a poll about removing the Confederate flag from that state’s flag.

    MS_CL

    In St. Louis, Missouri, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch captured a sky full of fireworks with a statue of King Louis IX looking on.

    MO_SLPD

    The Oklahoman, from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, has what looks to me like the fourthiest Fourth of July front today.

    OK_DOK

    Home News Tribune in East Brunswick, New Jersey, led the front with an editorial about why freedom of the press matters. Read more

  • Gawker Media alleges ‘serious irregularity’ in Hulk Hogan sex-tape evidence
    Hogan. (AP)

    Hogan. (AP)

    Last week, Gawker Media prevailed in a legal battle it had been waging with the FBI for more than a year.

    A judge ruled that the bureau and another law enforcement agency had to turn over evidence related to an investigation into a sex tape that figures prominently into Gawker’s pending high-stakes lawsuit.

    But during a hearing today, lawyers from Gawker Media expressed concerns about the evidence.

    Representatives from Gawker Media, the FBI and the Executive Office of United States Attorneys appeared before a judge at a United States District Court in Tampa, Florida. The purpose of the hearing was to sort out which documents requested by Gawker under the Freedom of Information Act the law enforcement organizations were legally obligated to turn over. Read more


Nevart Apikian

The Post-Standard

A chance assignment, plus an opportunity to cover entertainers and their shows during her first year as a professional journalist, resulted in Nevart Apikian's lifelong career writing about music, musicians, actors, movies and theater.
Nevart, a Syracuse native, took her first job at the Sullivan County Evening News in Monticello soon after graduating from Syracuse University. She spent a year covering stories about the courts, county government, town meetings and other news events. But, she also wrote about the entertainers who played the numerous Catskill Mountain resort hotels around Monticello.

After a year, she returned to Syracuse and a reporting job with The Post-Standard. As she recalls, "many assignments later, I covered the touring First Drama Quartet in (Bernard) Shaw's 'Don Juan in Hell.' This led to my becoming the theater and movie critic of the newspaper for more than 25 years."

During that time, Nevart found Syracuse "rich in music, theater and art. I was fortunate in being able to write about the Syracuse Symphony, Syracuse Opera and Syracuse Stage, and the many excellent community theaters, and about television. I recall fondly the former Lyric Circus in Skaneateles and the Pompeian Players."

One of her most interesting experiences, says Nevart, a first-generation American, is the trip she took to Armenia, where her parents were born. During the trip she visited Yerevan, the capital of that small country which lies in the shadow of Mt. Ararat near the Black Sea. The journey also gave her an opportunity to practice the Armenian she learned as a child in Syracuse.

Nevart is a past president of Theta Sigma Phi, a journalism honorary now known as Women in Communications, and of the Central New York Chapter of the National League of American Pen Women. She also is a member of Civic Morning Musicals and the Trip Committee of the Everson Museum of Art.

In looking back on her career in the newsroom, she notes the changes from a time when reporters and writers worked to the click-clack and bell ringing of typewriters to the almost silent word processors of present day computers. She says she is grateful for all of the unique stories she covered and interesting people she met. An example of her unique assignments is among Nevart's prized souvenirs -- a photo of her on an elephant, taken when she covered a circus visit to Syracuse. --Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:15 )
 
"Freedom of the press is not an end in itself but a means to the end of [achieving] a free society."
Felix Frankfurter, Associate Justice, US Supreme Court

Wall of Distinction

Maureen Green

WTVH-TV
WIXT-TV

Like a lot of Central New Yorkers, Maureen Green came here for the educational opportunities and then never left. A native of Worcester, Massachusetts, Maureen came to Syracuse for graduate work at the S.I. Newhouse School of Communications.

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