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Poynter.
  • Times-Picayune will close New Orleans print facility, print in Alabama

    The Times-Picayune

    The Times-Picayune will close its New Orleans print facility and print in Alabama, it announced Tuesday. About 100 production jobs will be lost, but none from the newsroom, the Advance-owned paper says.

    Ray Massett, the general manager of Advance Central Services Louisiana, says Advance Central Services Alabama will print the Picayune in Mobile, Alabama. The move “will reduce print-related costs, improve efficiencies and allow for greater use of color in the pages of The Times-Picayune,” the report says.

    ACS Alabama handles printing and packaging for The Times-Picayune’s sister paper, The Press-Register. Massett added that printing remotely is commonplace at many newspapers that formerly housed their presses near their newsrooms.

    Masset also said the building housing the current print facilities “may be donated to a nonprofit institution in the community.”

    Read more
  • Tribune Publishing will reportedly buy Sun-Times’ suburban papers

    Robert Feder

    Tribune Publishing will buy 38 suburban papers owned by Chicago Sun-Times parent Wrapports LLC, Robert Feder reports.

    “We do not comment on speculation,” Matthew Hutchison, a spokesperson for Tribune Publishing, told Poynter.

    Tribune Publishing CEO Jack Griffin said in July that purchasing “smaller newspapers in or near his existing markets” would be part of the recently spun-off company’s strategy. Since the year began, Tribune’s Baltimore Sun Media Group bought the Baltimore City Paper as well as two other Maryland papers, The Capital in Annapolis and the Carroll County Times.

    Last year Wrapports launched a hyperlocal service called Aggrego, which it said at the time could provide content that would back in to the Sun-Times Media Group’s papers. The Sun-Times has not replied for a request for comment about the sale report and what that might mean for Aggrego.

    Read more
  • How a Florida reporter got Jack Kerouac’s last interviews

    Tampa Bay Times

    Last year, the Tampa Bay Times (which Poynter owns) reran this story by reporter Jack McClintock, who spent time with Jack Kerouac in St. Petersburg, Florida, where Kerouac was living with his mother. The article ran on Oct. 12, 1969. Kerouac died on Oct. 21, 45 years ago today. “According to Kevin Hayes, author of the book Conversations With Jack Kerouac, McClintock’s interviews were Kerouac’s last,” the story says.

    McClintock returned to Kerouac’s home several times to report the story. Here’s the end of that piece:

    Kerouac wanted to talk about the article he had written, which was selling rather well to Sunday magazines in major cities in the U.S.

    “It’s about the Communist conspiracy,” he said. He eyed the reporter narrowly, and when satisfied with the lack of response, began to read. The article was typed on yellow legal paper. He read with broad, wild gestures, grinning and mugging and assuming various foreign accents. The voice went up high, dropped confidentially low. It sped along, it dragged portentously. And the words had an unusual eloquence, the allusions were astonishingly erudite, the sounds made a lush and rich cadence, all coming from this man with bare feet and two days’ growth of salt-and-pepper whiskers.

    It was a wondrous performance, so much so that the reporter came away without the vaguest notion of what the article might have been about.

    “I’m glad to see you ’cause I’m very lonesome here,” he said, and then talked for a moment about the proposed new novel.

    “Stories of the past,” said Jack Kerouac. “My story is endless. I put in a teletype roll, you know, you know what they are, you have them in newspapers, and run it through there and fix the margins and just go, go – just go, go, go.”

    Author Jack Kerouac laughs during a 1967 visit to the home of a friend in Lowell, Mass. (AP Photo/Stanley Twardowicz)

    Author Jack Kerouac laughs during a 1967 visit to the home of a friend in Lowell, Mass. (AP Photo/Stanley Twardowicz)

    In March of last year, Times’ reporter Ben Montgomery wrote about the house in St. Pete where Kerouac lived.

    There’s not much left of Kerouac here, save some stories and old acquaintances and a favorite bar stool or two. And this house.

    His mother died not long after Jack, and Stella passed in 1990, but the house has been mostly empty of humans since the ’70s. To walk inside is to be transported back 40 years. Tchotchkes from the era line the shelves. A ’72 Chevy Caprice sits on flats in the two-car garage. A Reader’s Digest from September 1967 sits on the record cabinet. A 1969 telephone directory for Lowell, Mass., is shelved on Kerouac’s desk in the bedroom. A Boone’s Farm box is in a closet. An official mayoral proclamation for “Jack Kerouac Day” in Lowell, Mass., hangs on one wall, near a Buddha statue and a crucifix.

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Rod Wood

WIXT

WHEN, WNDR

Club President: 1976

Rod Wood?s interest in news goes back to when he wrote and published a little neighborhood newspaper while he was still in elementary school in Syracuse.
Part of his interest may have come from his father and mother, who met while they both were employed at the old Syracuse Journal -- although neither was in news.

He says he lost interest in news for a period while he became involved in drama, and even thought about becoming an actor. While in high school, he took part in a Syracuse University Drama Department program and starred in a production of ?Pinnochio.? But, after he graduated from Nottingham High School in 1960, Uncle Sam beckoned and Rod went into the U.S. Army. During his three years of military service, Rod repeatedly tried to get into the Armed Services Radio Network, but couldn?t get the Army to transfer him from his duties in the Military Police.

After his discharge in 1963, Rod applied for a job with WOLF radio in Syracuse and persisted until the station gave him a chance. His broadcasting work -- and especially his voice -- drew the interest of WNDR radio in 1964, and he was offered a job broadcasting news. Three years later, Rod moved from WNDR to WHEN, where he became the radio station?s morning news anchor and then news director in 1974. He also served as backup anchor on WHEN-TV during the nine years he was on James Street.

Rod joined WIXT in 1976 as news anchor, where he has been ever since. He currently co-anchors NewsChannel 9 at noon and at 5:30 and 6 p.m. Each night, he also brings Central New Yorkers a money talk report from Consumer Reports.

He has been on local airwaves doing the news for 38 years. In addition to his broadcasting career, Rod has worked with a number of community organizations, including several volunteer fire departments and the Red Cross.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:16 )
 
"Good night, and good luck."
--Edward R. Murrow

Wall of Distinction


Mario Rossi

Herald-Journal
Herald American
The Post-Standard

Mario Rossi, a Syracuse native, started his newspaper career at 17 as a summer-time reporter for The Post-Standard and was still writing columns for the Syracuse Newspapers almost seven decades later.

Read more...Link

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