Send us your

company news! Share

your organization's information.

Send releases to

contact@
syracusepressclub.org
 
 

Syracuse Press Club

Annual Awards

Dinner

May 3, 2014

at Drumlins. Make your
Reservations Now! 

 Follow syrpressclub on Twitter
Poynter.
  • Elisa Jackson Named Executive Director of Poynter Foundation; Chris Martin Leaving to Pursue Opportunities in Academia

    Chris Martin, vice president of external relations and president of the Poynter Foundation, is leaving her position. Elisa Jackson has been promoted to executive director of the foundation, which is the Poynter Institute’s fundraising arm, and she will manage the foundation’s fundraising efforts.

    “I’ve been restructuring all facets of the institute as part of a new strategic plan that is designed to change our business model and bolster the finances of the institute for the long term,” said Tim Franklin, who became Poynter Institute’s president 10 months ago. “We’ve made significant progress this year, and I’m quite optimistic about 2015. This restructuring has included changes to the teaching team, our Poynter.org leadership and our program coordinators.”

    Franklin recently began conversations about restructuring the foundation and as a result of those conversations, he said, Martin decided to leave the job.

    “It is her wish to pursue some new opportunities in higher education,” Franklin said. Read more

  • Secrets of Prize-Winning Journalism: This American Life’s Harper High School

    “This American Life” reporters Ben Calhoun, Alex Kotlowitz and Linda Lutton spent an entire semester embedded in Harper High School in Chicago — where the previous school year, 29 former or current students were shot and eight died.

    Working with producers Robyn Semien, Julie Snyder and Ira Glass, the team created two hour long documentaries that captured daily life in a school and neighborhood racked by gun violence.

    The story earned a Peabody Award, the Jack R. Howard Award for Radio In-Depth coverage and the Dart Center prize for journalism and trauma. Peabody judges called the work “vivid, unblinking, poignant and sometimes gut-wrenching;” Dart judges said the story was “profoundly moving” and “extraordinarily comprehensive and compassionate.”

    Shortly after “This American Life” aired the story, President Obama hosted Harper students at the White House and Michelle Obama spent an afternoon at the school.

    In an interview with Poynter’s Ellyn Angelotti Kamke for Poynter’s e-book Secrets of Prize-Winning Journalism, Calhoun, Kotlowitz and Lutton discussed their extensive reporting process, and how they created a narrative that embraces an array of compelling personal perspectives. Read more

  • Most memorable stories of 2014

    S. Mitra Kalita is the executive editor of Quartz, on Poynter’s adjunct faculty, and a Spencer Fellow at Columbia University. She tweets @mitrakalita.

    A friend of mine recently pondered the role of memory in journalism, saying an information overload has robbed his recall. Sometimes it feels like stories aren’t read as much as Facebooked, tweeted, toggled all day long. What actually gets absorbed, retained, understood?

    This was my dilemma as Poynter asked me to compile the top 10 stories of 2014. Insecure about whether the best journalism had actually reached me, my inclination was to crowdsource the list. That felt dishonest. Key takeaway of my transition to digital media: only authenticity wins the internet.

    So here are my picks, based solely on the top stories I remember from 2014. I whittled it down to the 11 that stayed with me long beyond the last line or my share. Note that I wrote this before newspapers began trotting out ambitious, investigative packages to make the Pulitzer deadline. Read more


Rod Wood

WIXT

WHEN, WNDR

Club President: 1976

Rod Wood?s interest in news goes back to when he wrote and published a little neighborhood newspaper while he was still in elementary school in Syracuse.
Part of his interest may have come from his father and mother, who met while they both were employed at the old Syracuse Journal -- although neither was in news.

He says he lost interest in news for a period while he became involved in drama, and even thought about becoming an actor. While in high school, he took part in a Syracuse University Drama Department program and starred in a production of ?Pinnochio.? But, after he graduated from Nottingham High School in 1960, Uncle Sam beckoned and Rod went into the U.S. Army. During his three years of military service, Rod repeatedly tried to get into the Armed Services Radio Network, but couldn?t get the Army to transfer him from his duties in the Military Police.

After his discharge in 1963, Rod applied for a job with WOLF radio in Syracuse and persisted until the station gave him a chance. His broadcasting work -- and especially his voice -- drew the interest of WNDR radio in 1964, and he was offered a job broadcasting news. Three years later, Rod moved from WNDR to WHEN, where he became the radio station?s morning news anchor and then news director in 1974. He also served as backup anchor on WHEN-TV during the nine years he was on James Street.

Rod joined WIXT in 1976 as news anchor, where he has been ever since. He currently co-anchors NewsChannel 9 at noon and at 5:30 and 6 p.m. Each night, he also brings Central New Yorkers a money talk report from Consumer Reports.

He has been on local airwaves doing the news for 38 years. In addition to his broadcasting career, Rod has worked with a number of community organizations, including several volunteer fire departments and the Red Cross.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:16 )
 
"If none of us ever read a book that was “dangerous,” had a friend who was “different” or joined an organization that advocated “change,” we would all be just the kind of people Joe McCarthy wants. Whose fault is that? Not really [McCarthy’s]. He didn’t create this situation of fear. He merely exploited it, and rather successfully."
--Edward R. Murrow

Wall of Distinction


Saundra Smokes

The Post-Standard

Herald-Journal

Herald American

"I see through the eyes of a Christian, an African-American, a woman, a journalist, an aunt, a daughter. Someone who feels at ease with all kinds of people. I try to bring that varied perspective to my columns," says Saundra Smokes.

Read more...Link

Who's Online?

We have 9 guests online

Search