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Syracuse Press Club


NYS Open Gov. Cmte's Bob Freeman

Nov 19, 2015, 7 PM

at Syracuse University, Newhouse III, Rm 141

 Follow syrpressclub on Twitter
  • How freelance journalists can (mostly) avoid working for free

    Imagine punching in and out for time spent on researching, interviews, and writing. Now imagine making nothing or next to nothing for that time. Welcome to the minefield of freelance journalism in the age of the Internet.

    Most journalism outlets use some combination of salaried, contract, freelance, intern, and sometimes what is called a “citizen journalist”, “user-generated content” or some other term that means unpaid work.
    “Like many modern media outlets, we’re not completely exploiting everyone, but we are exploiting someone,” wrote Cord Jefferson in 2013 for Gawker of that publication’s practices.

    How-To-Submit-A-Guest-Post---ForbesAt Forbes, some contributors are not paid, while others get a flat monthly fee and bonuses for good traffic. One of those contributors, Susannah Breslin, opines that her flat-fee-incentive-based work for Forbes is normal. Read more

  • Reader’s Digest parent company bets its life on hearth-and-home, wholesome audience

    trustedmedia-740Bonnie Kintzer has had plenty of experience as a publishing consultant and executive as well as earning a Harvard MBA degree. Still, when she signed on as CEO in April 2014 to turn around the twice-bankrupt Reader’s Digest Association, it may have looked from the outside like Mission Impossible.

    “I came in with my eyes fully open,” Kintzer said, beginning a progress-report phone interview earlier this month. While not yet achieving fabulous financials, Kintzer now has in place a new executive team, new digital strategies and a much expanded digital audience.

    In late September, after more than a year’s preparation, the company took a plunge and rebranded. Reader’s Digest, the magazine, is still Reader’s Digest.  But the venerable Reader’s Digest Association has been rechristened Trusted Media Brands Inc. Read more

  • How the media blew reporting the Chicago cop’s shooting of a teen
    Jamie Kalven, who led the way on disclosures in the police shooting of Laquan McDonald. (Screenshot via YouTube)

    Jamie Kalven, who led the way on disclosures in the police shooting of Laquan McDonald. (Screenshot via YouTube)

    The video has now been seen around the world, sparking outrage and a rare first-degree murder charge against a Chicago police officer.

    The tale of Laquan McDonald, the dead teenager, is one that operates on many important social, cultural and political levels. But it also provides a window onto a frequent staple of dreary daily journalism across the country: uncritical reporting on shootings and killings that can verge on lapdog journalism.

    It’s thus important to know that quite apart from the editorial indignation now being expressed, key disclosures in the case did not come from mainstream media outlets. Yes, they reported on the original shooting, but in a mostly skimpy, pro forma way that proved a bulletin board for the initial claims of police. Read more

Rod Wood



Club President: 1976

Rod Wood?s interest in news goes back to when he wrote and published a little neighborhood newspaper while he was still in elementary school in Syracuse.
Part of his interest may have come from his father and mother, who met while they both were employed at the old Syracuse Journal -- although neither was in news.

He says he lost interest in news for a period while he became involved in drama, and even thought about becoming an actor. While in high school, he took part in a Syracuse University Drama Department program and starred in a production of ?Pinnochio.? But, after he graduated from Nottingham High School in 1960, Uncle Sam beckoned and Rod went into the U.S. Army. During his three years of military service, Rod repeatedly tried to get into the Armed Services Radio Network, but couldn?t get the Army to transfer him from his duties in the Military Police.

After his discharge in 1963, Rod applied for a job with WOLF radio in Syracuse and persisted until the station gave him a chance. His broadcasting work -- and especially his voice -- drew the interest of WNDR radio in 1964, and he was offered a job broadcasting news. Three years later, Rod moved from WNDR to WHEN, where he became the radio station?s morning news anchor and then news director in 1974. He also served as backup anchor on WHEN-TV during the nine years he was on James Street.

Rod joined WIXT in 1976 as news anchor, where he has been ever since. He currently co-anchors NewsChannel 9 at noon and at 5:30 and 6 p.m. Each night, he also brings Central New Yorkers a money talk report from Consumer Reports.

He has been on local airwaves doing the news for 38 years. In addition to his broadcasting career, Rod has worked with a number of community organizations, including several volunteer fire departments and the Red Cross.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:16 )
"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."
--Thomas Jefferson

Wall of Distinction

Wesley Clark

Dean, Syracuse University Journalism School

Skaneateles Press

Marcellus Observer

"He loved his students and his students loved him. He was a very fine teacher. He was a star. We're going to miss him."
Read more...Link

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