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Poynter.
  • President Obama: The ‘world is shaped by people like Jim Foley’

    James Foley, a journalist who reported for GlobalPost and Agence France-Presse about conflicts in the Middle East, has been missing since November 2012. He was apparently killed by a terrorist group, and video of the incident was posted on the Internet Tuesday.

    Foley in 2011. Photograph by Jonathan Pedneault

    President Obama addressed the country today about the incident. Here is the complete text of his speech:

    THE PRESIDENT: Good afternoon, everybody. Today, the entire world is appalled by the brutal murder of Jim Foley by the terrorist group, ISIL.

    Jim was a journalist, a son, a brother, and a friend. He reported from difficult and dangerous places, bearing witness to the lives of people a world away. He was taken hostage nearly two years ago in Syria, and he was courageously reporting at the time on the conflict there.

    Read more
  • Why journalists should be skeptical about autopsy reports

    A.C. Thompson is not a doctor. But neither are many of the people performing autopsies in the United States, says the ProPublica reporter, who has developed a special interest in those procedures.

    “Reporters would do well to approach autopsies with some skepticism,” he said in a phone call. Among the problems with autopsies he’s outlined through his reporting: Many are performed by people with no medical training. In many jurisdictions, “When you’re cutting up dead bodies, you actually don’t have to be licensed by anyone,” he said. (Former New Orleans Parish coroner Frank Minyard told him one of the most important qualities in a coroner is the “love that you have for your fellow man.”)

    Thompson.

    Thompson read about 900 autopsies from New Orleans Parish after Hurricane Katrina and found stuff that was “absolutely mind-boggling” in them: “People would be shot to death by police, they would be beaten to death by police, and you would get an autopsy that would fail to note the very, very obvious injuries to their bodies,” he said.… Read more

  • ‘Where’s the calming?’ Scenes from the St. Louis Post-Dispatch’s morning meeting

    ST. LOUIS — Around 10 a.m. on Wednesday morning, a small group of journalists stand in a loose circle on the fifth-floor newsroom of the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. It’s quiet except for the static of the scanner. Many desks sit empty, for now. On one wall, front pages from the week hang in three rows. As the group waits for the metro team to join the scrum, they talk about news that isn’t about Ferguson, Missouri, the St. Louis suburb that’s made international headlines for more than a week.

    That non-Ferguson news written in purple dry-erase marker on a large white board includes: boy bands, free burritos and a forecast that shows temps in St. Louis heating up in what’s so far been a cool summer.… Read more


Rod Wood

WIXT

WHEN, WNDR

Club President: 1976

Rod Wood?s interest in news goes back to when he wrote and published a little neighborhood newspaper while he was still in elementary school in Syracuse.
Part of his interest may have come from his father and mother, who met while they both were employed at the old Syracuse Journal -- although neither was in news.

He says he lost interest in news for a period while he became involved in drama, and even thought about becoming an actor. While in high school, he took part in a Syracuse University Drama Department program and starred in a production of ?Pinnochio.? But, after he graduated from Nottingham High School in 1960, Uncle Sam beckoned and Rod went into the U.S. Army. During his three years of military service, Rod repeatedly tried to get into the Armed Services Radio Network, but couldn?t get the Army to transfer him from his duties in the Military Police.

After his discharge in 1963, Rod applied for a job with WOLF radio in Syracuse and persisted until the station gave him a chance. His broadcasting work -- and especially his voice -- drew the interest of WNDR radio in 1964, and he was offered a job broadcasting news. Three years later, Rod moved from WNDR to WHEN, where he became the radio station?s morning news anchor and then news director in 1974. He also served as backup anchor on WHEN-TV during the nine years he was on James Street.

Rod joined WIXT in 1976 as news anchor, where he has been ever since. He currently co-anchors NewsChannel 9 at noon and at 5:30 and 6 p.m. Each night, he also brings Central New Yorkers a money talk report from Consumer Reports.

He has been on local airwaves doing the news for 38 years. In addition to his broadcasting career, Rod has worked with a number of community organizations, including several volunteer fire departments and the Red Cross.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:16 )
 
"Free speech carries with it some freedom to listen."
Warren E Burger, Chief Justice, US Supreme Court
Majority opinion in 7-1 ruling that prohibited the closing of courtrooms to the press, 2 Jul 80

Wall of Distinction


Ron Graeff (Hastings)

Club President

Ron Graeff is better known to viewers across Central New York as Ron Hastings. It was the name he used  on the air during a career in journalism that began during his days at Syracuse University.  There he served as managing editor of the Daily Orange during 1966. 
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