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Poynter.
  • How to crop photos for Facebook and adapt to the News Feed’s latest algorithm change

    Lost in the noise over Facebook’s crackdown on clickbait last week was another change to the social network that could impact all news organizations: the News Feed algorithm will now favor link posts over photo posts and status updates.

    When you paste a link to an article on your news organization’s page and Facebook automatically generates a preview box containing the story’s headline, a photo and other information, that’s a link post (here’s documentation on making sure the Facebook Crawler identifies the right information for the link preview). Alternatively, Facebook says, “Some publishers share links in status updates or in the text caption above photos.”

    Here’s an example of a link post:

    (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

  • Journalists are losing access, but the public still expects the story

    This weekend, Florida International University opened its 2014 football season at home in Miami against Bethune-Cookman University. The game was close, ending when FIU fumbled a field goal attempt that would have won the game as time ran out.

    Pretty good game, I’m guessing. But I’m only going on the six paragraphs that ran on the Miami Herald’s website under a byline: “From Miami Herald Wire Services.”

    The Herald decided not to cover the game. Why?

    Because FIU refused to give a press pass to the Herald’s FIU beat reporter, David J. Neal.

    In a statement issued Saturday and placed atop the Herald’s original story on the flap, FIU said:

    “We did not issue a media credential to the Herald’s beat reporter because of concerns we have brought up to the Herald’s reporter and editors over the past few years about the reporter’s interactions with our student athletes, coaches, and staff and the nature of the resulting coverage.”

    “As far as we can tell,” Managing Editor Rick Hirsch said in the Herald’ story, “David has done a diligent, thorough job of reporting on the Golden Panthers.… Read more

  • Today in media history: ‘The Workingmen’s Picnic’ and other early Labor Day reports

    What was the news coverage like for the first Labor Day celebrations? The Library of Congress and its “Chronicling America” collection gives us some newspaper examples and this description of the first parade:

    On September 5, 1882, some 10,000 workers assembled in New York City to participate in America’s first Labor Day parade. After marching from City Hall, past reviewing stands in Union Square, and then uptown to 42nd Street, the workers and their families gathered in Wendel’s Elm Park for a picnic, concert, and speeches. This first Labor Day celebration was eagerly organized and executed by New York’s Central Labor Union, an umbrella group made up of representatives from many local unions. Debate continues to this day as to who originated the idea of a workers’ holiday, but it definitely emerged from the ranks of organized labor at a time when they wanted to demonstrate the strength of their burgeoning movement and inspire improvements in their working conditions.

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Rod Wood

WIXT

WHEN, WNDR

Club President: 1976

Rod Wood?s interest in news goes back to when he wrote and published a little neighborhood newspaper while he was still in elementary school in Syracuse.
Part of his interest may have come from his father and mother, who met while they both were employed at the old Syracuse Journal -- although neither was in news.

He says he lost interest in news for a period while he became involved in drama, and even thought about becoming an actor. While in high school, he took part in a Syracuse University Drama Department program and starred in a production of ?Pinnochio.? But, after he graduated from Nottingham High School in 1960, Uncle Sam beckoned and Rod went into the U.S. Army. During his three years of military service, Rod repeatedly tried to get into the Armed Services Radio Network, but couldn?t get the Army to transfer him from his duties in the Military Police.

After his discharge in 1963, Rod applied for a job with WOLF radio in Syracuse and persisted until the station gave him a chance. His broadcasting work -- and especially his voice -- drew the interest of WNDR radio in 1964, and he was offered a job broadcasting news. Three years later, Rod moved from WNDR to WHEN, where he became the radio station?s morning news anchor and then news director in 1974. He also served as backup anchor on WHEN-TV during the nine years he was on James Street.

Rod joined WIXT in 1976 as news anchor, where he has been ever since. He currently co-anchors NewsChannel 9 at noon and at 5:30 and 6 p.m. Each night, he also brings Central New Yorkers a money talk report from Consumer Reports.

He has been on local airwaves doing the news for 38 years. In addition to his broadcasting career, Rod has worked with a number of community organizations, including several volunteer fire departments and the Red Cross.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:16 )
 
"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."
--Thomas Jefferson

Wall of Distinction


Karin Franklin-King

WNYS-TV (Ch. 9)

WSYR, WCNY-TV

Nine years after Karin Franklin-King's 1967 arrival in Central New York to attend Onondaga Community College, she was a local broadcast pioneer.

Read more...Link

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