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  • Julie Drizin will be executive director of Current

    American University | Current

    The American University School of Communication announced Friday that Julie Drizin will be the first executive director of Current, the news organization devoted to covering non-profit media in America.

    Drizin is the director of the Journalism Center on Children and Families at the University of Maryland, which announced earlier this year it would close due to lack of financial support.

    Current is seeking to expand its coverage, according to a release from American University. It currently has a team of five editors and reporters, along with “a corps of freelance contributors.”

    Here’s the release:

    The American University School of Communication has hired public media journalist, producer, and critic Julie Drizin for the new position of Executive Director of Current, as the newspaper and website seeks to expand its coverage and impact in U.S. public and nonprofit media spaces.

    “I am thrilled to be coming home to public media as the Executive Director of Current,” says Drizin.

    Read more
  • Guardian: NYT makes ‘big move’ into London

    The Guardian

    The New York Times will move “up to 100″ staff to a new digital center in London, The Guardian’s Roy Greenslade reported Friday.

    Greenslade writes that the new outpost, which will be based in the Bloomsbury borough of England’s capital city, will “become the newspaper’s European digital hub and centre for the paper’s international issues.”

    There is no question of the Paris office itself – home for so long to the iconic International Herald Tribune – being closed. It is simply believed that London is a more appropriate place from which to cover the European continent.

    According to a Property Week article, the paper’s owners have signed a deal for the entire 9,000 sq ft building at close to the asking rental fee of £50 a sq ft.

    Read more
  • Tips from a fact-checker: ‘Ultimately it’s about the care that you take with a piece’

    Pen

    Fact-checking is about both the big and the small, the grit of details and the arc of story.

    “What checking does is similar to so many other types of editing,” says Yvonne Rolzhausen, head of the fact-checking department at The Atlantic. “Ultimately it’s about the care that you take with a piece.”

    Rolzhausen first interned at The Atlantic during her senior year of college and started as a proofreader there in 1993. Early in her career, she had to head to the Boston Public Library to go through microfiche for her work.

    “It wasn’t pre-Internet, but it wasn’t too far off,” she said.

    We spoke about the work of fact-checkers and lessons the rest of us can learn from them.

    1. It’s about the details.

    The only way you can look at any piece, whether it’s a paragraph or a 20,000-word story, is in detail — every word, every phrase, every connection. Read more


Laura Hand Wright

WSTM-TV

Laura Hand is probably best-known as the news anchor on WSTM-TV's "Action News at Noon," but she has many other jobs at the station -- and has taken on many roles in community organizations as well.
Laura got into news broadcasting while studying at Syracuse University. In the 1969-70 school year, she served as news director for WAER-FM. She spent the following summer as editor of "Report to the Middle East" at the Voice of America in Washington. After receiving a degree in journalism and political science in 1971, she joined WFBL radio as a news reporter for two years.

In 1972, Laura switched to television, joining WSYR-TV (now WSTM-TV) Channel 3 as a reporter. She's been there ever since -- mostly in news. She not only anchors Channel 3’s noon newscast, but also puts the program together every day. She also hosts and produces "Our Community" each Sunday, produces and writes the community calendar feature "3 in Touch," and is the web content manager for CNY Entertainment on wstm.com. Until a few years ago, Laura was the early morning news anchor and producer/anchor for public affairs documentaries.

Since January 1993, she added the position of community relations director to her resume. In that role, her responsibilities include developing campaigns to increase Channel 3's visibility in the community, producing and tracking public service announcements, and involving members of the station staff in community activities.

When it comes to community activities, Laura could be the role model for involvement. She is vice chair of the Salvation Army’s Advisory Board, working on marketing and annual resource development. She initiated the annual Tree of Lights gift program during the Christmas holidays, and expanded the Salvation Army's Dome Day food donation program.

She is also on the Northeast Community Center’s board of directors and serves on Syracuse’s Weed & Seed steering committee. And if all of this isn't enough, she finds time to read to school children and emcee community events.

Over the years, Laura has served with the "Hope for the Bereaved" advisory board, where she helped establish the Butterfly Garden of Hope on Onondaga Lake Parkway; the Mental Health Association Task Force on Children and Adolescents; Metropolitan Commission on Aging outreach project; American Lung Association CNY Chapter Board; Syracuse organizing committee, National Senior Sports Classic, Syracuse Press Club board; and a number of SU organizations including the Newhouse School Alumni Association board.

All of these activities have won Laura a large number of awards. Among them, she was named an SU Outstanding Alumna in 1992; She received the Marguerite Higgins Journalism Prize for Gulf War coverage; a National Merit Award from the Community Action Network for the "Feed the Hungry" campaign in 1994; three awards from the Associated Press and 10 from the Syracuse Press Club, including two SPC Professional Standards awards. Laura is listed in "Who’s Who of American Women."
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:24 )
 
"A composite is a euphemism for a lie. It’s disorderly. It’s dishonest and it’s not journalism."
---Fred W Friendly, Columbia School of Journalism

Wall of Distinction

Timothy Bunn

The Post-Standard

Timothy Bunn, a native Syracusan, recently retired in February 2007 from The Post-Standard after a 33-year newspaper career. Twenty-six of those years were spent working in Syracuse, for the evening Herald-Journal, Sunday Herald American and The Post-Standard.

Read more...Link

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