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  • Julie Drizin will be executive director of Current

    American University | Current

    The American University School of Communication announced Friday that Julie Drizin will be the first executive director of Current, the news organization devoted to covering non-profit media in America.

    Drizin is the director of the Journalism Center on Children and Families at the University of Maryland, which announced earlier this year it would close due to lack of financial support.

    Current is seeking to expand its coverage, according to a release from American University. It currently has a team of five editors and reporters, along with “a corps of freelance contributors.”

    Here’s the release:

    The American University School of Communication has hired public media journalist, producer, and critic Julie Drizin for the new position of Executive Director of Current, as the newspaper and website seeks to expand its coverage and impact in U.S. public and nonprofit media spaces.

    “I am thrilled to be coming home to public media as the Executive Director of Current,” says Drizin.

    Read more
  • Guardian: NYT makes ‘big move’ into London

    The Guardian

    The New York Times will move “up to 100″ staff to a new digital center in London, The Guardian’s Roy Greenslade reported Friday.

    Greenslade writes that the new outpost, which will be based in the Bloomsbury borough of England’s capital city, will “become the newspaper’s European digital hub and centre for the paper’s international issues.”

    There is no question of the Paris office itself – home for so long to the iconic International Herald Tribune – being closed. It is simply believed that London is a more appropriate place from which to cover the European continent.

    According to a Property Week article, the paper’s owners have signed a deal for the entire 9,000 sq ft building at close to the asking rental fee of £50 a sq ft.

    Read more
  • Tips from a fact-checker: ‘Ultimately it’s about the care that you take with a piece’

    Pen

    Fact-checking is about both the big and the small, the grit of details and the arc of story.

    “What checking does is similar to so many other types of editing,” says Yvonne Rolzhausen, head of the fact-checking department at The Atlantic. “Ultimately it’s about the care that you take with a piece.”

    Rolzhausen first interned at The Atlantic during her senior year of college and started as a proofreader there in 1993. Early in her career, she had to head to the Boston Public Library to go through microfiche for her work.

    “It wasn’t pre-Internet, but it wasn’t too far off,” she said.

    We spoke about the work of fact-checkers and lessons the rest of us can learn from them.

    1. It’s about the details.

    The only way you can look at any piece, whether it’s a paragraph or a 20,000-word story, is in detail — every word, every phrase, every connection. Read more


Joan Vadeboncoeur

Herald-Journal

Herald American

Joan E. Vadeboncoeur, went to work at The Post-Standard as a reporter immediately after graduating from Sarah Lawrence College. But since she already had several years experience in theater work, she was a natural choice years later when the job of entertainment writer-editor opened at the Herald-Journal.
Joan, a life resident of the Syracuse area, began working in the box office of Famous Artists Country Playhouse in Fayetteville while still in high school. During summer vacations in college, Joan switched to the Famous Artists Country Playhouse in East Rochester, where she also worked in the box office and as assistant to the producer.

While studying theater at Sarah Lawrence, Joan gained more experience by working in a Broadway producer's office. Her jobs included working on "Midsummer," the play in which Geraldine Page made her Broadway bow. She also appeared in college productions.

After two years at The Post-Standard, Joan moved to the Herald-Journal as a general assignment reporter covering traffic accidents and other mishaps, and writing obituaries. She often rode in ambulances to accident scenes. Soon, her duties expanded as she filled in for vacationing movie and television writers.

Not too much later, Joan was appointed as music writer. Within two years, she became entertainment writer-editor, which included television, music, films, and theater.

Joan, now an entertainment columnist, has received the Syracuse Press Club's Lifetime Achievement Award, and has been honored by the Salt City Center for the Performing Arts and the Contemporary Theatre of Syracuse. She is a former member of Women in Communications. --Joseph A. Porcell
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:26 )
 
"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."
--Thomas Jefferson

Wall of Distinction

Timothy Bunn

The Post-Standard

Timothy Bunn, a native Syracusan, recently retired in February 2007 from The Post-Standard after a 33-year newspaper career. Twenty-six of those years were spent working in Syracuse, for the evening Herald-Journal, Sunday Herald American and The Post-Standard.

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