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  • Caroline Little is stepping down as CEO and President of Newspaper Association of America

    littleCaroline LIttle will be leaving her job as president and CEO of the Newspaper Association of America at the end of August, NAA announced this afternoon.

    She will have been head of the industry trade association for just over four years when she departs.

    Little is a lawyer and served as publisher/CEO of Washington Post/Newsweek Interactive and then as CEO of the Guardian’s North America operations before joining NAA in 2011. Her background as a digital executive figured in her being hired to succeed John Sturm who served 16 years and was a lawyer and experienced lobbyist.

    I reached Little by phone, and asked what she expects to do next. “I don’t really have any future plans right now,” she replied, except moving to Sante Fe, “where I have a husband, a child and a dog — in that order.”

    As industry’s revenues have fallen, NAA has sharply downsized.   Read more

  • The New York Times linked John Bolton’s op-ed to a story making the opposite case

    The Intercept

    Yesterday, former United Nations ambassador John Bolton published an op-ed in the pages of The New York Times, arguing that the United States has no choice but to bomb Iran. “Only military action like Israel’s 1981 attack on Saddam Hussein’s Osirak reactor … can accomplish what is required,” Bolton wrote.

    But The Intercept’s Jon Schwarz noticed something odd about that sentence in the paper’s online edition. The reference to Israel’s attack on the Osirak reactor contained a link to a Washington Post op-ed that argued that far from crippling Iraq’s nuclear weapons program, Israel’s attack actually compelled Saddam Hussein to employ 7,000 scientists and spend $10 billion in pursuit of a nuclear bomb.

    This is not exactly the sort of supporting link that Bolton might have hoped for. Read more

  • ACES: AP’s guidance on suicide terms shows sensitivity

    ACES

    On Friday at the American Copy Editors Society conference, The Associated Press revealed some of the upcoming changes to the 2015 AP Stylebook, and among them is updated guidance on suicide terms.

    From our earlier story with the AP’s David Minthorn:

    With stories about suicide, the AP now recommends not going into details.

    “The guidance also says that we avoid using the term committed suicide except in direct quotations from authorities.”

    Instead used “killed himself, took her own life or died by suicide.”

    “Committed in that context suggests possibly an illegal act, but in fact, laws against suicide have been repealed in the U.S., at least in certain states, and many other places,” Minthorn said, “so we’re going to avoid using that term on our own, although it’s a term that authorities widely use and we will use it while quoting authorities.”

    After those changes and others were shared at the ACES conference, ACES sent out a press release in support of the AP’s guidance on suicide terms. Read more


Joan Vadeboncoeur

Herald-Journal

Herald American

Joan E. Vadeboncoeur, went to work at The Post-Standard as a reporter immediately after graduating from Sarah Lawrence College. But since she already had several years experience in theater work, she was a natural choice years later when the job of entertainment writer-editor opened at the Herald-Journal.
Joan, a life resident of the Syracuse area, began working in the box office of Famous Artists Country Playhouse in Fayetteville while still in high school. During summer vacations in college, Joan switched to the Famous Artists Country Playhouse in East Rochester, where she also worked in the box office and as assistant to the producer.

While studying theater at Sarah Lawrence, Joan gained more experience by working in a Broadway producer's office. Her jobs included working on "Midsummer," the play in which Geraldine Page made her Broadway bow. She also appeared in college productions.

After two years at The Post-Standard, Joan moved to the Herald-Journal as a general assignment reporter covering traffic accidents and other mishaps, and writing obituaries. She often rode in ambulances to accident scenes. Soon, her duties expanded as she filled in for vacationing movie and television writers.

Not too much later, Joan was appointed as music writer. Within two years, she became entertainment writer-editor, which included television, music, films, and theater.

Joan, now an entertainment columnist, has received the Syracuse Press Club's Lifetime Achievement Award, and has been honored by the Salt City Center for the Performing Arts and the Contemporary Theatre of Syracuse. She is a former member of Women in Communications. --Joseph A. Porcell
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:26 )
 

"People in the media say they must look … at the president with a microscope. Now, I don’t mind a microscope, but boy, when they use a proctoscope, that’s going too far."
--Richard M. Nixon

Wall of Distinction


Laura Hand Wright

WSTM-TV

Laura Hand is probably best-known as the news anchor on WSTM-TV's "Action News at Noon," but she has many other jobs at the station -- and has taken on many roles in community organizations as well.
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