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  • Tribune Tower is up for sale
    The Tower (AP Photo)

    Tribune Tower, photographed in 2006. (AP Photo)

    Chicago Sun-Times | Chicago Tribune

    Tribune Tower, the iconic headquarters of the Chicago Tribune, is on the market.

    Tribune Media, the owner of the 36-story Michigan Avenue landmark “has hired real estate investment banker Eastdil Secured to explore an outright sale or partnership,” the Chicago Tribune’s Robert Channick reported Thursday:

    Built in 1925, Tribune Tower was designed by New York architects Raymond Hood and John Mead Howells, who won a contest held by Chicago Tribune co-publishers Robert R. McCormick and Joseph Patterson to create the newspaper’s headquarters.

    Reports of the tower’s potential sale have circulated before. In 2006, a company spokesperson shot down rumors that the building was on the market amid the company’s $2 billion share buyback plan. Read more

  • How 3 New Jersey newsrooms are turning to their readers for story ideas
    (New Brunswick at night. Photo by razordu30/Flickr)

    (New Brunswick, New Jersey at night. Photo by razordu30/Flickr)

    Earlier this year, during a New Jersey summer that saw a particularly nasty heat wave, readers of a local news site in New Brunswick had a question: Why couldn’t they find any public swimming pools in their community?

    Under normal circumstances, that question might have fallen by the wayside, filed away with other timeless story ideas on some interminable to-do list. But staffers at New Brunswick Today are now considering answering that question thanks to Hearken, a platform for reader engagement that helps newsrooms interact with their communities.

    New Brunswick Today is one of three news organizations in New Jersey that have received funding from a group of nonprofits to incorporate Hearken into their newsrooms. Read more

  • What Gannett gets by getting bigger and why newspaper consolidation will continue

    For three different reasons, Gannett’s surprise acquisition Wednesday of Journal Media Group (the former Scripps papers and the Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel) makes a lot of sense:

    – In the era of digital transformation, bigger is better. A larger audience translates to better prospects for digital ad sales. The combined operations will have 100 million monthly uniques, according to the press release announcing the deal.

    – Any such merger brings efficiency as corporate offices combine and shrink. Gannett said that it expects $35 million in savings and may have other cost-cutting initiatives at the ready.  Smaller newsrooms are a possibility but not a certainty.

    – Gannett has a suite of centralized programs — news feeds from USA Today, a common content management system, events and digital marketing services capacity — that will pay off the more markets they touch. Read more

E.R. Vadeboncoeur

WSYR Radio and TV

Syracuse Journal

Mention the name E.R. Vadeboncoeur and it's his radio news broadcasts and Election Night commentaries that come to mind for many longtime Central New Yorkers. Long forgotten is that "Curly," as he was known to his friends, started out to be a newspaperman.


He got his first job on a newspaper after leaving Central High School and worked his way up to city editor at the old Syracuse Journal. When the paper merged with the Herald a few years later, he was offered a spot on the new Herald-Journal. Instead, he decided -- on the advice of his wife Orletta -- to switch to broadcasting by accepting another job offer at WSYR Radio.

The change made sense because Curly had been doing a Sunday night broadcast on WFBL called "City Editor" during his later years at the Journal. Soon after joining WSYR, he began doing noon-hour news and commentary every day. In the late 1940s, he successfully crusaded against a proposal for a city sales tax. (Years later, however, the tax became reality).

In an effort to help his listeners better understand what was happening overseas during World War II, Curly traveled to the Pacific for a month. He is believed to be the only war correspondent accredited personally by Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Several times, he risked his life by flying in bombers on missions out of New Guinea to get a better feel of war.

In the early 1950s, several years after he became general manager of WSYR radio and television, Vadeboncoeur gave up his broadcasts to become more involved in S.l. Newhouse's plans to expand Newhouse Broadcasting, which owned WSYR. The expansion included purchase of stations in Harrisburg, PA; St. Louis, MO; Birmingham, AL; and Portland, OR. Curly traveled weekly to Harrisburg and once a month to the others. He also was involved in the development of Newhouse cable properties.

Meanwhile, he continued to appear on television every Election Night, analyzing returns for viewers after being introduced as the "dean of Syracuse newsmen."

As a boy, Curly Vadeboncoeur earned money to support his widowed mother by bicycling prints of films from theater to theater. His interest in theater led him to join Murray Bernthal to create the Famous Artists Series in 1946. The two men also launched a concert series. The following year, they inaugurated the star-driven Famous Artists Country Playhouse in Fayetteville, later expanding to East Rochester and Watkins Glen.

Vadeboncoeur served as president of the Upstate Chapter of American Cancer Society, was awarded the Simon LeMoyne Medal by LeMoyne College, and chaired numerous Red Cross benefits.

Even after Newhouse sold off the television stations and then the radio stations, E.R. continued to preside over the Newhouse cable enterprises almost until his death in 1986.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:26 )

"Give light and the people will find their own way."
SCRIPPS-HOWARD newspapers, motto.

Wall of Distinction

Saundra Smokes

The Post-Standard


Herald American

"I see through the eyes of a Christian, an African-American, a woman, a journalist, an aunt, a daughter. Someone who feels at ease with all kinds of people. I try to bring that varied perspective to my columns," says Saundra Smokes.

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