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Poynter.
  • Scott Van Pelt to bring unique voice to new solo edition of SportsCenter

    Scott-Van-PeltWhen ESPN approached Scott Van Pelt about going solo with the midnight (Eastern) edition of “SportsCenter,” he initially said no.

    Van Pelt was the co-host of a popular midday radio show on the network, which gave him the opportunity to express his views about various issues in sports. Typically, “SportsCenter” hosts aren’t given as much latitude in that regard. It’s mainly scores and highlights.

    “I pushed back,” Van Pelt said. “I loved the radio show where I had the ability to have an opinion. They came back to me and said, ‘No, we’re encouraging that [if he did the ‘SportsCenter' show]. We want you to bring opinion to that space.’ That made it an incredibly compelling opportunity.”

    As a result, Van Pelt said good-bye to his radio show in June. Read more

  • Searching for a news anniversary angle? Look to your audience
    katrina.thenandnow

    For Katrina’s fifth anniversary, CNN partnered with local residents to shoot a series of then-and-now photographs. (Katie Hawkins-Gaar/CNN)

    Every journalist knows the drill: As a milestone anniversary of a notable event approaches, the planning meetings and team discussions begin. How are we going to cover this? What’s our angle? How many resources will we devote?

    The 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina is no different. Given the magnitude of the disaster and the proliferation of digital content, it’s nearly impossible to keep up with everything that’s been published so far. (If you are trying to keep up with it all, NOLA.com is a great resource.)

    Places like The Washington Post, BuzzFeed and ESPN produced beautiful longform pieces. Journalists created poignant radio stories, smart interactives and stunning photographs. Read more

  • Trump claims pundits turning his way
    Screen shot, MSNBC

    Screen shot, MSNBC

    Media fascination with Donald Trump was on display again early Thursday during a 15-minute Trump call-in to MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

    Trump was generally treated with kid gloves, with co-host Joe Scarborough continually referring to him as “Donald” (it was the same once with colleague Willie Geist) as Trump broke now new ground amid his usual array of bombastic policy generalizations.

    But he did claim that resounding criticism aside, the media is somehow turning his way.

    When asked about rebukes from conservative columnists George Will and Charles Krauthammer, Trump responded in somewhat garbled fashion and said, “Instead of attacking people like Krauthammer and George Will, there is a movement out there, the pundits have come a long way on me.”

    He offered no examples of anybody of any particular stature changing their views even as he said, “A lot of pundits have come over.”

    He even cited an appearance in South Carolina the day before and how an unidentified CNN reporter “in a beautiful red dress” claimed his speech was the best political speech she’d ever heard. Read more


E.R. Vadeboncoeur

WSYR Radio and TV

Syracuse Journal

Mention the name E.R. Vadeboncoeur and it's his radio news broadcasts and Election Night commentaries that come to mind for many longtime Central New Yorkers. Long forgotten is that "Curly," as he was known to his friends, started out to be a newspaperman.

 

He got his first job on a newspaper after leaving Central High School and worked his way up to city editor at the old Syracuse Journal. When the paper merged with the Herald a few years later, he was offered a spot on the new Herald-Journal. Instead, he decided -- on the advice of his wife Orletta -- to switch to broadcasting by accepting another job offer at WSYR Radio.

The change made sense because Curly had been doing a Sunday night broadcast on WFBL called "City Editor" during his later years at the Journal. Soon after joining WSYR, he began doing noon-hour news and commentary every day. In the late 1940s, he successfully crusaded against a proposal for a city sales tax. (Years later, however, the tax became reality).

In an effort to help his listeners better understand what was happening overseas during World War II, Curly traveled to the Pacific for a month. He is believed to be the only war correspondent accredited personally by Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Several times, he risked his life by flying in bombers on missions out of New Guinea to get a better feel of war.

In the early 1950s, several years after he became general manager of WSYR radio and television, Vadeboncoeur gave up his broadcasts to become more involved in S.l. Newhouse's plans to expand Newhouse Broadcasting, which owned WSYR. The expansion included purchase of stations in Harrisburg, PA; St. Louis, MO; Birmingham, AL; and Portland, OR. Curly traveled weekly to Harrisburg and once a month to the others. He also was involved in the development of Newhouse cable properties.

Meanwhile, he continued to appear on television every Election Night, analyzing returns for viewers after being introduced as the "dean of Syracuse newsmen."

As a boy, Curly Vadeboncoeur earned money to support his widowed mother by bicycling prints of films from theater to theater. His interest in theater led him to join Murray Bernthal to create the Famous Artists Series in 1946. The two men also launched a concert series. The following year, they inaugurated the star-driven Famous Artists Country Playhouse in Fayetteville, later expanding to East Rochester and Watkins Glen.

Vadeboncoeur served as president of the Upstate Chapter of American Cancer Society, was awarded the Simon LeMoyne Medal by LeMoyne College, and chaired numerous Red Cross benefits.

Even after Newhouse sold off the television stations and then the radio stations, E.R. continued to preside over the Newhouse cable enterprises almost until his death in 1986.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:26 )
 
    "Woe to that nation whose literature is cut short by the intrusion of force. This is not merely interference with freedom of the press but the sealing up of a nation’s heart, the excision of its memory."
--Alexander Solzhenitsyn

Wall of Distinction


Joel Mareiniss

WSYR-TV (WSTM)

WSYR

WHEN

For more than four decades, an instantly recognizable face, a captivating smile, and a voice that was once synonymous with Syracuse University football and basketball, Joel Mareiniss earned the distinction of being a Central New York broadcast legend.
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