Send us your

company news! Share

your organization's information.

Send releases to

contact@
syracusepressclub.org
 
 

Syracuse Press Club

Annual Awards

Dinner

May 3, 2014

at Drumlins. Make your
Reservations Now! 

 Follow syrpressclub on Twitter
Poynter.
  • Patricia Smith’s new life as a poet

    The New York Times

    In The Working Life, Rachel Swarns’ column for The New York Times, Swarns reintroduces readers to Patricia Smith, “Staten Island’s literary sensation, a poet, an English professor and a star on the national stage.”

    She’s the same Smith, Swarns writes, who left The Boston Globe in 1998 after admitting to fabrication. Smith doesn’t talk much about that time in her life and asks, basically, to be allowed to move on.

    “It’s been 16 years, you know,” said Ms. Smith, 59. “People have to give you a chance to be who you are now.”

    Some people who claw their way out of the abyss turn their fall into a strand of their personal narrative. But Ms. Smith does not aspire to be the star of anyone’s tale of reinvention.

    Swarns writes about Smith’s work now and the awards she has won. Swarns also spoke with one of Smith’s former colleagues at the Globe. Read more

  • Former Fox employee kills himself outside of News Corp building

    The Wall Street Journal

    A man who fatally shot himself outside News Corp’s New York headquarters was a former employee of a Fox News affiliate, Pervaiz Shallwani and Heather Haddon wrote Monday for The Wall Street Journal.

    The Wall Street Journal report, attributed to “a law enforcement official,” says the man, Phillip Perea, worked out of a station in Austin, Texas. He was “handing out fliers” that blamed his employers for having “ended my career,” right before he shot himself:

    A suicide note and a gun were recovered at the scene, the official said. Mr. Perea took to his Twitter page about an hour before the shooting, further criticizing his former employer and linking to a more than 8-minute YouTube video laying out his complaints.

    A Twitter account registered to a user matching the name given to The Wall Street Journal tweeted Monday about workplace bullying and linked to a YouTube playlist called “The American Workplace Bully: How FOX News Ended My Career.” There are 35 videos in the playlist, and many feature a narrator discussing perceived conflicts with his employer. Read more

  • In the move downtown, New Yorker staff dug through paper and booze

    The New Yorker

    Read about this week’s cover, “Moving Day,” by Bruce McCall: http://t.co/7pmmuof1oC pic.twitter.com/5zWQUQb4eU

    — The New Yorker (@NewYorker) January 26, 2015

    The New Yorker’s latest cover is a farewell to 4 Times Square, where the magazine’s offices were located for 15 years. Nick Paumgarten writes for The New Yorker about the move to 1 World Trade Center and the things staff sifted through on the way out.

    Frankly, it was harder to get ready to leave. As a prelude to the move, the staff, told that it would have to travel light, spent weeks purging offices of the detritus of the decades. Some of it was easy to bid goodbye to: here and there a shrine of exotic booze (flask of Ugandan banana gin, anyone?) or a Cornell-box assemblage of promotional doodads. The things we keep around! But mostly it was paper, whole forests’ worth. Thousands upon thousands of orphaned books, some hoarded for novelty appeal, or a nascent interest, or a bygone assignment, or out of allegiance to (or guilt about) writer friends—an “accretion of intention,” as one acquaintance put it—were trucked off to Housing Works and the like.

    Read more

E.R. Vadeboncoeur

WSYR Radio and TV

Syracuse Journal

Mention the name E.R. Vadeboncoeur and it's his radio news broadcasts and Election Night commentaries that come to mind for many longtime Central New Yorkers. Long forgotten is that "Curly," as he was known to his friends, started out to be a newspaperman.

 

He got his first job on a newspaper after leaving Central High School and worked his way up to city editor at the old Syracuse Journal. When the paper merged with the Herald a few years later, he was offered a spot on the new Herald-Journal. Instead, he decided -- on the advice of his wife Orletta -- to switch to broadcasting by accepting another job offer at WSYR Radio.

The change made sense because Curly had been doing a Sunday night broadcast on WFBL called "City Editor" during his later years at the Journal. Soon after joining WSYR, he began doing noon-hour news and commentary every day. In the late 1940s, he successfully crusaded against a proposal for a city sales tax. (Years later, however, the tax became reality).

In an effort to help his listeners better understand what was happening overseas during World War II, Curly traveled to the Pacific for a month. He is believed to be the only war correspondent accredited personally by Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Several times, he risked his life by flying in bombers on missions out of New Guinea to get a better feel of war.

In the early 1950s, several years after he became general manager of WSYR radio and television, Vadeboncoeur gave up his broadcasts to become more involved in S.l. Newhouse's plans to expand Newhouse Broadcasting, which owned WSYR. The expansion included purchase of stations in Harrisburg, PA; St. Louis, MO; Birmingham, AL; and Portland, OR. Curly traveled weekly to Harrisburg and once a month to the others. He also was involved in the development of Newhouse cable properties.

Meanwhile, he continued to appear on television every Election Night, analyzing returns for viewers after being introduced as the "dean of Syracuse newsmen."

As a boy, Curly Vadeboncoeur earned money to support his widowed mother by bicycling prints of films from theater to theater. His interest in theater led him to join Murray Bernthal to create the Famous Artists Series in 1946. The two men also launched a concert series. The following year, they inaugurated the star-driven Famous Artists Country Playhouse in Fayetteville, later expanding to East Rochester and Watkins Glen.

Vadeboncoeur served as president of the Upstate Chapter of American Cancer Society, was awarded the Simon LeMoyne Medal by LeMoyne College, and chaired numerous Red Cross benefits.

Even after Newhouse sold off the television stations and then the radio stations, E.R. continued to preside over the Newhouse cable enterprises almost until his death in 1986.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:26 )
 
"If none of us ever read a book that was “dangerous,” had a friend who was “different” or joined an organization that advocated “change,” we would all be just the kind of people Joe McCarthy wants. Whose fault is that? Not really [McCarthy’s]. He didn’t create this situation of fear. He merely exploited it, and rather successfully."
--Edward R. Murrow

Wall of Distinction


Paul Ennis

WIXT

WSTM

Paul Ennis came to Syracuse as the first member of his family to enroll in college. Good teachers in the public schools of his hometown, Port Chester, New York, had given him encouragement and approval as a writer, so he entered Syracuse University knowing he would somehow work with language.
Read more...Link

Who's Online?

We have 13 guests online

Search