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  • A&E Networks purchase stake in Vice Media

    The Hollywood ReporterNew York Times | The Huffington Post | Financial Times |

    A&E Networks will pay $250 million for a 10 percent stake in Vice Media, a deal that values the company at 2.5 billion, Paul Bond wrote in The Hollywood Reporter Friday.

    Earlier in the day, Time Warner dropped its bid to purchase a stake in Vice Media, a deal reportedly fell through because the two companies could not agree how much Vice Media was worth, Jonathan Mahler wrote for The New York Times. He wrote one possible outcome for the deal might have included giving Vice control of HLN, a network owned by Time Warner that has seen flagging ratings recently.

    Vice chief executive Shane Smith told Financial Times that the investment from A&E was “a great deal,” adding that it will enable the company to grow for another three years.… Read more

  • Intercept redesign shows article pageview counter

    The Intercept

    The Intercept debuted a new look Friday, shrinking its navigation bar, adding a pageview counter and reconfiguring the homepage layout.

    The new design allows readers to see more content — one prominent story and four secondary stories — without having to scroll.

    Here’s a look at the transformation:

    Before:

    After:

    The new icon next to the tally of comments for each story indicates how many pageviews the article received. The new feature is meant to help readers choose between stories, said John Cook, editor-in-chief at the Intercept.

     

    “Gawker publishes traffic data, so does Business Insider,” Cook said. “It’s an easy way for readers to gauge which stories on the front page might be more interesting.

    Also new is a “most popular” sidebar that stays frozen on the left side of the page as users scroll:

    Intercept co-founder Glenn Greenwald referred to the redesign as “stage 1,” on Twitter, implying that more change might be on the way:

    Re-design!

    Read more
  • Overworked and overwhelmed? Consider these 7 questions

    If you’re feeling swamped at work these days, you’re not alone. I’m not talking “I don’t get to go out for lunch very often” busy. I mean “I’m buried in work, never fully off the clock and still feel I’m letting people down” busy. I hear it regularly from the managers I teach and coach.

    It’s a function of the downsized staffing but increased demands and responsibilities in changing organizations.

    The story is familiar: to hit budget numbers, the company cuts head count but leaves fully intact the expectation of quality, service and measurable results. (I’ll give CNN president Jeff Zucker credit. Referencing the depressing specter of buyouts and layoffs, he didn’t try to spin it as some great opportunity for the survivors to work smarter, not harder.… Read more


E.R. Vadeboncoeur

WSYR Radio and TV

Syracuse Journal

Mention the name E.R. Vadeboncoeur and it's his radio news broadcasts and Election Night commentaries that come to mind for many longtime Central New Yorkers. Long forgotten is that "Curly," as he was known to his friends, started out to be a newspaperman.

 

He got his first job on a newspaper after leaving Central High School and worked his way up to city editor at the old Syracuse Journal. When the paper merged with the Herald a few years later, he was offered a spot on the new Herald-Journal. Instead, he decided -- on the advice of his wife Orletta -- to switch to broadcasting by accepting another job offer at WSYR Radio.

The change made sense because Curly had been doing a Sunday night broadcast on WFBL called "City Editor" during his later years at the Journal. Soon after joining WSYR, he began doing noon-hour news and commentary every day. In the late 1940s, he successfully crusaded against a proposal for a city sales tax. (Years later, however, the tax became reality).

In an effort to help his listeners better understand what was happening overseas during World War II, Curly traveled to the Pacific for a month. He is believed to be the only war correspondent accredited personally by Gen. Douglas MacArthur. Several times, he risked his life by flying in bombers on missions out of New Guinea to get a better feel of war.

In the early 1950s, several years after he became general manager of WSYR radio and television, Vadeboncoeur gave up his broadcasts to become more involved in S.l. Newhouse's plans to expand Newhouse Broadcasting, which owned WSYR. The expansion included purchase of stations in Harrisburg, PA; St. Louis, MO; Birmingham, AL; and Portland, OR. Curly traveled weekly to Harrisburg and once a month to the others. He also was involved in the development of Newhouse cable properties.

Meanwhile, he continued to appear on television every Election Night, analyzing returns for viewers after being introduced as the "dean of Syracuse newsmen."

As a boy, Curly Vadeboncoeur earned money to support his widowed mother by bicycling prints of films from theater to theater. His interest in theater led him to join Murray Bernthal to create the Famous Artists Series in 1946. The two men also launched a concert series. The following year, they inaugurated the star-driven Famous Artists Country Playhouse in Fayetteville, later expanding to East Rochester and Watkins Glen.

Vadeboncoeur served as president of the Upstate Chapter of American Cancer Society, was awarded the Simon LeMoyne Medal by LeMoyne College, and chaired numerous Red Cross benefits.

Even after Newhouse sold off the television stations and then the radio stations, E.R. continued to preside over the Newhouse cable enterprises almost until his death in 1986.
--Joseph A. Porcello
Last Updated ( Monday, 17 November 2008 01:26 )
 
"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."
--Thomas Jefferson

Wall of Distinction


Lois Vosburgh

The Post-Standard

Herald-Journal

When Lois Vosburgh joined the staff of the Herald-Journal, she expected to be there only two weeks. She came in response to an editor's call to help in the Woman's Department, which had just lost two reporters.

Read more...Link

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