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May 3, 2014

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Poynter.
  • Leaders change lives, thanks Jim Mutscheller

    JimMutscheller-300It was April of 1973, and I was about to spend my last summer as a college student water-proofing basements.

    An English major about to enter my senior year, I only recently had decided I might like to work for a newspaper, but my applications for internships at Baltimore’s dailies – the Sunpapers and The News American – had been rejected.

    A summer of digging in wet basements awaited.

    Then I took a ride on an elevator with the former pro football player.

    Jim Mutscheller had just spoken at a Notre Dame Club of Maryland luncheon at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. A graduate of ND in 1952, he had gone on to play tight end for the Baltimore Colts—and Number 84 had become a hero on my team of boyhood heroes.

    He introduced himself to me following lunch as we were waiting for the Down elevator. Once on board, Jim asked what I planned to do with my summer. Read more

  • New Yorker cover artist says resemblance to August cartoon is unintentional

    The New Yorker’s new cover is a beautiful, understated take on the unrest in Ferguson this past week.
    newyorker1282014

    It also bears a strong resemblance to an Aug. 21 editorial cartoon by R.J. Matson. (courtesy Cagle)
    matson-arch

    Bob Staake, who illustrated the New Yorker cover, writes on Facebook that he hadn’t before seen Matson’s cartoon.

    (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

    Daryl Cagle, who publishes the Cagle cartoons syndicate, told Poynter in an email that many New Yorker political covers follow in the footsteps of editorial cartoonists: “It would be more unusual if a New Yorker cover hadn’t been drawn by a political cartoonist first,” he wrote.

    Staake also told The New Yorker’s Mina Kaneko and Francoise Mouly he used to live in St. Louis and “At first glance, one might see a representation of the Gateway Arch as split and divided, but my hope is that the events in Ferguson will provide a bridge and an opportunity for the city, and also for the country, to learn and come together.”

    Read more
  • Lessons learned: TV-newspaper partner on investigative project

    Dallas TV station KXAS (NBC5) and the Dallas Morning News teamed up to investigate complaints of harassment by hundreds of soldiers at the Army’s Warrior Transition Units (WTU’s) that were designed to help the injured heal. In the process of documenting the poor treatment of Army veterans these separate media outlets learned about how to work together.

    sig

    The story 
    The project, called “Injured Heroes, Broken Promises,” took more than six months of work, relied on hundreds of pages of government records and interviews with dozens of injured veterans who said they had been “ridiculed, harassed and threatened by the commanders of Army units created to help injured soldiers heal.

    Three of the nation’s 25 WTU’s’s are in Texas. The units are supposed to manage the care and treatment of wounded, ill or injured soldiers, whether they are physically or mentally injured, or both. 64,000 soldiers have used the treatment programs since 2007. Read more

Written by Administrator   

Don Edwards

WSYR / WSTM-TV

Club President: 1965

The road to success for Don Edwards started in a small southern Ohio village and led to the general manager job at a major Syracuse television station, and later to the top job in the broadcast journalism department at Syracuse University's Newhouse School.
Along the way, Don moved to Canton, Ohio, where he graduated from high school and soon enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army. It was 1950 and the Korean War was getting underway. By the time he was discharged in 1953, he had been promoted to lieutenant.

His interest in radio and television news brought him to Syracuse University, for which his "extensive research" showed him was where the best broadcast journalism program in the United States was located. Like many students who had been in the military, Don wanted to complete his education as soon as possible. He earned his bachelor's degree in just three years, then wasted no time starting on a master's degree in broadcast journalism in 1956. Meanwhile at SU, Don met his wife, Nancy, and, as he puts it, "I wound up trading my master's degree for a wedding license."

That same year, Don joined the staff of WSYR-TV and radio as a photographer-reporter. "In those early days of TV," he explains, "when a photographer went out on an assignment, he often was the reporter, too." So the photographer also wrote a story for the WSYR radio stations!

Don decided early that he wanted to get into management, so in 1958 he switched to producing documentaries, and directing special projects at the television and radio stations. Seven years later, he became the WSYR's public affairs director, a position he held until 1975 when he was named general manager of WSYR-FM.

During his early days at WSYR, one of Don's interests was the search for a plentiful supply of fresh water for Onondaga County. He realized that a good water supply was badly needed if the area was to develop and grow. So Don worked with Onondaga County's Lake Ontario Water Committee to successfully convince voters in the 1960's to approve the $45 million expenditure to guarantee an inexhaustible supply of Lake Ontario water.

He also found time to work on several Syracuse Press Club committees in those years, and was elected president in 1965.

In 1978, Don became program manager of WSYR-TV (now WSTM-TV), and four years later, he was named general manager of the television station. During all of these changes, Don remained in the US Army Reserve. By 1976, after serving 23 years, he had achieved the rank of lieutenant colonel and decided to retire from the Army.

In 1986, SU asked Don to join the faculty of the broadcast journalism department. He decided that after 30 years in broadcast journalism, it was time to make the move. So he accepted the job offer. The following year, he was named chair of the department and continued in that position until he retired in 1999. During Don's 10 years as chair, the department's student enrollment soared from under 100 to 600-plus.

Don and his wife, a native of Central New York, are spending their retirement years in the region they most love. "The quality of life here is fantastic," he says.
--Joseph A. Porcello
 
    "Their constant yelping about a free press means, with a few honorable exceptions, freedom to peddle scandal, crime, sex, sensationalism, hate, innuendo and the political and financial uses of propaganda. A newspaper is a business out to make money through advertising revenue. That is predicated on the circulation and you know what circulation depends on."
--Raymond Chandler

Wall of Distinction


Robert R. Haggart

The Post-Standard

Herald-Journal

Herald American

“This is my valentine to Brenda Marie McCabe Haggart. Unfortunately, this valentine will not look or taste as good as those hearts that grade school teachers in Kansas helped me cut out and paste on big pieces of red paper. I can still taste the paste. It tasted almost as good as a peanut-butter sandwich. Writing this public confession of joy may seem a little arrogant on my part, Brenda, since I didn't ask you if I could do it. But you owe me one. My voice is gone.”
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