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Poynter.
  • Star Tribune runs ad bashing transgender kids

    Good morning. Here are 10 media stories.

    1. News Corp buys online real estate business: Move, Inc., owns Realtor.com, Move.com and ListHub. News Corp will “turbo-charge traffic growth” to Move’s properties, and it will “benefit from the high-quality geographic data generated by real estate searches,” CEO Robert Thomson says. (BusinessWire) | Last year Move “reported $600,000 in profit atop $227 million in revenue.” (NYT)
    2. Minneapolis Star Tribune ran an ad bashing transgender kids: The Minnesota Child Protection League ran a full-page ad Sunday in an attempt to influence the Minnesota State High School League, which may “approve a new policy that would allow transgender students to participate in athletics based on their gender identity.” Strib VP Steve Yaeger tells Aaron Rupar: “The ad in question met all the requirements of our ad policy.” (Minneapolis City Pages) | Earlier this year the Strib took some heat for how it reported on a transgender person.
    Read more
  • Career Beat: National Press Foundation gets a new president

    Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

    • Ann Shoket will be a consultant for Hearst. Previously, she was editor in chief of Seventeen magazine. (Capital New York)
    • Kal Penn will be a special correspondent for Fusion. Previously, he was associate director of the White House’s Office of Public Engagement. (Politico)
    • Richard Tomko is now publisher of amNewYork. Previously, he was a consultant at Boost Digital. (Email)
    • Tony Brancato is now executive director of Web products and audience development at The New York Times. Previously, he was head of product for the Web there. (The New York Times)
    • Sandy Johnson is now president and chief operating officer at the National Press Foundation. Previously, she was the excecutive editor at Stateline.org.
    Read more
  • 100 hours: How one L.A. Times reporter binge-watched his way through an investigation

    When Joe Mozingo came back from the Salt Lake City in September 2012, he had a lot of TV to watch. Mozingo, a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, had been on assignment investigating an FBI sting when when a source gave him a cache of discs that contained more than 100 hours of undercover footage.

    Taken together, they told the story of Ted Gardiner, an FBI informant who’d killed himself after helping expose an underground trade in illicit artifacts stolen from Anasazi land in Utah. The footage showed clandestine meetings between Gardiner and would-be criminals that eventually became the foundation of a six-chapter multimedia investigation loaded with original footage and actualities.

    Gardiner. (Screenshot from Los Angeles Times via Gardiner family)

    But before it became a story, it was just a box filled with discs.… Read more

Written by Administrator   

Don Edwards

WSYR / WSTM-TV

Club President: 1965

The road to success for Don Edwards started in a small southern Ohio village and led to the general manager job at a major Syracuse television station, and later to the top job in the broadcast journalism department at Syracuse University's Newhouse School.
Along the way, Don moved to Canton, Ohio, where he graduated from high school and soon enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army. It was 1950 and the Korean War was getting underway. By the time he was discharged in 1953, he had been promoted to lieutenant.

His interest in radio and television news brought him to Syracuse University, for which his "extensive research" showed him was where the best broadcast journalism program in the United States was located. Like many students who had been in the military, Don wanted to complete his education as soon as possible. He earned his bachelor's degree in just three years, then wasted no time starting on a master's degree in broadcast journalism in 1956. Meanwhile at SU, Don met his wife, Nancy, and, as he puts it, "I wound up trading my master's degree for a wedding license."

That same year, Don joined the staff of WSYR-TV and radio as a photographer-reporter. "In those early days of TV," he explains, "when a photographer went out on an assignment, he often was the reporter, too." So the photographer also wrote a story for the WSYR radio stations!

Don decided early that he wanted to get into management, so in 1958 he switched to producing documentaries, and directing special projects at the television and radio stations. Seven years later, he became the WSYR's public affairs director, a position he held until 1975 when he was named general manager of WSYR-FM.

During his early days at WSYR, one of Don's interests was the search for a plentiful supply of fresh water for Onondaga County. He realized that a good water supply was badly needed if the area was to develop and grow. So Don worked with Onondaga County's Lake Ontario Water Committee to successfully convince voters in the 1960's to approve the $45 million expenditure to guarantee an inexhaustible supply of Lake Ontario water.

He also found time to work on several Syracuse Press Club committees in those years, and was elected president in 1965.

In 1978, Don became program manager of WSYR-TV (now WSTM-TV), and four years later, he was named general manager of the television station. During all of these changes, Don remained in the US Army Reserve. By 1976, after serving 23 years, he had achieved the rank of lieutenant colonel and decided to retire from the Army.

In 1986, SU asked Don to join the faculty of the broadcast journalism department. He decided that after 30 years in broadcast journalism, it was time to make the move. So he accepted the job offer. The following year, he was named chair of the department and continued in that position until he retired in 1999. During Don's 10 years as chair, the department's student enrollment soared from under 100 to 600-plus.

Don and his wife, a native of Central New York, are spending their retirement years in the region they most love. "The quality of life here is fantastic," he says.
--Joseph A. Porcello
 
 "Don’t be deluded into believing that the titular heads of the networks control what appears on their networks. They all have better taste."
--Edward R. Murrow

Wall of Distinction


Mario Rossi

Herald-Journal
Herald American
The Post-Standard

Mario Rossi, a Syracuse native, started his newspaper career at 17 as a summer-time reporter for The Post-Standard and was still writing columns for the Syracuse Newspapers almost seven decades later.

Read more...Link

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