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Poynter.
  • Apple watch: time for dramatic move into programming?

    Good morning.

    1. Tech goliath may go Hollywood

      Drum roll, please. "The moment the media and technology industries have been expecting for years may finally be arriving: Apple is exploring getting into the original programming business." Variety broke word that Apple's had "preliminary conversations in recent weeks" about producing entertainment content. Imagine if it really set its mind, and treasury, to go after Netflix, Amazon and others. It's dipped its tootsies into content via Apple Music. And, oh, it's got about $200 billion in cash on its balance sheet. That's billion. Or a lot more than beer and tipping money even in Beverly Hills. (Variety)

    2. Bloomberg layoffs coming

      The New York Post was right earlier in the month when reporting that the financial news giant would make big cuts, including in its huge, talented and at times rudderless Washington bureau.

    Read more
  • Financial maneuvers bring McClatchy share price back up

    McClatchy_logo-160x94Typically, having a stock trading at $1.26 a share is not cause for celebration. But when McClatchy stock closed at that level today, it represented a gain of 23.5 percent in the last three trading days.

    McClatchy was threatened two weeks ago with delisting on the New York Stock Exchange.  The company responded with two moves that appear to have boosted investor confidence:

    • It authorized a repurchase of up to $15 million of its regularly traded shares (there is a second class of stock controlled by family members that is not affected.)
    • It paid down debt by $22.9 million, further chipping away at the large interest expense that has dragged down earnings for years.

    Buying back shares is a slightly arcane practice, essentially a bet by the company that its stock is undervalued.  Read more

  • Behind a winning Trump tactic: feuding with the press
    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump answers questions from reporters at the National Federation of Republican Assemblies on Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump answers questions from reporters at the National Federation of Republican Assemblies on Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

    Mischiefs of Faction

    The resilience of Donald Trump includes his clearly relishing feuding with the press.

    What’s up with that?

    Richard Skinner, a George Mason University political scientist, contends that it’s part and parcel of a symbiotic relationship, including a somewhat complicated one with the “Conservative-Entertainment Complex.”

    Skinner and Seth Masket, a University of Denver political scientist, oversee a site called “Masters of Mischief,” and Skinner’s latest blog entry in part tries to make sense of one element of Trump’s surprisingly early durability.

    While Trump loves to feud with the mass media, his rise in polls matches up nicely with his disproportionate share of press coverage.

    Read more
Written by Administrator   

Don Edwards

WSYR / WSTM-TV

Club President: 1965

The road to success for Don Edwards started in a small southern Ohio village and led to the general manager job at a major Syracuse television station, and later to the top job in the broadcast journalism department at Syracuse University's Newhouse School.
Along the way, Don moved to Canton, Ohio, where he graduated from high school and soon enlisted as a private in the U.S. Army. It was 1950 and the Korean War was getting underway. By the time he was discharged in 1953, he had been promoted to lieutenant.

His interest in radio and television news brought him to Syracuse University, for which his "extensive research" showed him was where the best broadcast journalism program in the United States was located. Like many students who had been in the military, Don wanted to complete his education as soon as possible. He earned his bachelor's degree in just three years, then wasted no time starting on a master's degree in broadcast journalism in 1956. Meanwhile at SU, Don met his wife, Nancy, and, as he puts it, "I wound up trading my master's degree for a wedding license."

That same year, Don joined the staff of WSYR-TV and radio as a photographer-reporter. "In those early days of TV," he explains, "when a photographer went out on an assignment, he often was the reporter, too." So the photographer also wrote a story for the WSYR radio stations!

Don decided early that he wanted to get into management, so in 1958 he switched to producing documentaries, and directing special projects at the television and radio stations. Seven years later, he became the WSYR's public affairs director, a position he held until 1975 when he was named general manager of WSYR-FM.

During his early days at WSYR, one of Don's interests was the search for a plentiful supply of fresh water for Onondaga County. He realized that a good water supply was badly needed if the area was to develop and grow. So Don worked with Onondaga County's Lake Ontario Water Committee to successfully convince voters in the 1960's to approve the $45 million expenditure to guarantee an inexhaustible supply of Lake Ontario water.

He also found time to work on several Syracuse Press Club committees in those years, and was elected president in 1965.

In 1978, Don became program manager of WSYR-TV (now WSTM-TV), and four years later, he was named general manager of the television station. During all of these changes, Don remained in the US Army Reserve. By 1976, after serving 23 years, he had achieved the rank of lieutenant colonel and decided to retire from the Army.

In 1986, SU asked Don to join the faculty of the broadcast journalism department. He decided that after 30 years in broadcast journalism, it was time to make the move. So he accepted the job offer. The following year, he was named chair of the department and continued in that position until he retired in 1999. During Don's 10 years as chair, the department's student enrollment soared from under 100 to 600-plus.

Don and his wife, a native of Central New York, are spending their retirement years in the region they most love. "The quality of life here is fantastic," he says.
--Joseph A. Porcello
 
"Freedom of the press is not an end in itself but a means to the end of [achieving] a free society."
Felix Frankfurter, Associate Justice, US Supreme Court

Wall of Distinction


Roy Gallinger

Herald-Journal

Herald American

Marcellus Observer

Roy Gallinger left his mark on Central New York particularly with his down-to-earth reporting and hundreds of columns that shared the lives, exploits and foibles of his readers, their families and neighbors during his 50-plus-year career in area newspapers.
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