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Poynter.
  • 5 journalism tips from Mark Leibovich
    Leibovich. Credit: Ralph Alswang

    Leibovich. Credit: Ralph Alswang

    Mark Leibovich says his 2013 book, “This Town: Two Parties and a Funeral — Plus, Plenty of Valet Parking! — in America’s Gilded Capital,” did not make his job harder.

    “Its actually been easier,” The New York Times Magazine’s chief national correspondent said in a recent phone interview. “One of the interesting things about the book is everybody seems to think it’s about everybody else.”

    The book certainly didn’t seem to affect his relationship with former GOP nominee Mitt Romney. In fact, Romney — who himself gets 11 mentions in “This Town” — recently invited Leibovich into his summer home for a nearly 2,500-word profile that ran Sept. 30.

    So how does Leibovich maintain access to contacts like Romney in a town he spends his professional life turning upside down? Liebovich offered tips on running a precarious beat, conducting productive interviews and holding onto his outsider status while chasing insider information.

    1. To get access, think carefully about your pitches
    2. Leibovich still remembers scoring an interview with Sen. Marco Rubio in 2012, when rumors abounded he was mulling a run for president. Rubio was a highly courted interview subject back then, due in part to the presidential hype, and so was stubbornly “resisting a blitz of news media interest“. Like the rest of D.C.’s press corps, Leibovich wanted access. But unlike them, he had an edge.

      “I knew he loved football,” Leibovich said. “And not only did he love football, but he had this incredible, obsessive interest with the Miami Dolphins.”

      So, Leibovich reached out to Rubio’s camp and asked: Would the senator be interested in attending a Dolphins game with him? To sweeten the deal, Leibovich agreed to a ground rule not to ask questions about politics. Rubio agreed, and the trip resulted in a 2,500-word takeout that added personal dimensions to a national political figure.

      When Leibovich snagged an interview with Romney for his recent profile, the strategy was similar. Knowing that he and the former GOP nominee shared a sense of amusement over the unforeseen demand he’d found himself in as the election creeped closer, he reached out to Romney’s people with a pitch along those lines and got a green light.

      The lesson? When crafting pitches for sought-after subjects, do your research and think of an angle they’ll be receptive to, Leibovich said. They might not agree, but there’s a chance you’ll get lucky.

      “It’s hit or miss,” he said. “Many, many people say no. And I’m always surprised that as many people say yes as they do.”

    3. During interviews, keep your options open
    4. When Leibovich agreed to take politics off the table during his interview with Rubio, he was making a rare exception, he said. Leibovich tries to go into interviews with as much freedom as possible.

      When handlers or press people ask him whether he can submit questions in advance, Leibovich demurs, preferring to see where the interview goes. Though he researches his subjects in advance and has some idea of what he wants to ask, Leibovich leaves his conversations open-ended in the hopes he’ll find something to seize upon.

      “I’ve always been, for better or worse, a big proponent of winging it and sort of trusting that your experience or your holy terror will lead to something that’s worthwhile,” Leibovich said.

      Take, for example, the time he was watching the Dolphins game with Rubio. Right before an important play began, Leibovich decided to ask the senator point-blank whether he was running for president, clearly flouting the one ground rule for their conversation: No questions about politics. Although Rubio didn’t announce his electoral plans then and there, he didn’t abort the interview, either.

      “Trust your inner wiseass if it feels right,” Leibovich said. “Because you never know what it’s going to yield.”

    5. When writing, ‘keep your ass in the chair’
    6. Leibovich’s writing process — if it could be called that — goes something like this: he sits down to a blank screen without an outline, confronted by the empty space in front of him. Then, he writes the top of the story, something he’s perfectionistic about. After that, he pounds away at the keyboard until he has a draft.

      Although he prefers to be immersed in a busy newsroom while reporting, Leibovich says he likes to be left alone while writing. And he resists giving his editors a sneak peak at his work before it’s ready because early feedback will “stick in his head” and make turning out a draft more difficult.

      “Don’t be afraid of a really really shitty draft because it’s always preferable to empty space,” Leibovich said.

      When writing, he tries to cut down on distractions, leaving only dictionary.com and an online thesaurus open on his browser, rewarding himself with the occasional peek at Twitter or ESPN.com. This simple act — “keeping your ass in the chair” and gutting out a story — has “never been more important from a pure, getting-over-procrastination standpoint,” Leibovich said.

    7. Hold on to your independence
    8. Leibovich frequently acknowledges that he belongs to the media-political class he’s made his professional bones dissecting. In his 2010 profile of Mike Allen, Politico’s chief White House correspondent, Leibovich fesses up to being part of the insider-y Playbook community, having once alerted Allen that he “spotted” former Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner at an organic Chinese restaurant.

      And in the beginning of “This Town,” Leibovich writes that he is “part of this culture” that “reinforces my worst tendencies at times — vanity, opportunism, pettiness.”

      Journalists everywhere battle to separate their own values and allegiances from those held by the people on their beat, and that battle can be particularly difficult in D.C., where there’s “so much cross-pollination between the media class and the political class and the PR class and the business class,” Leibovich said.

      The solution? Struggle against it, Leibovich said. Yes, there are basic rules: Don’t accept outrageously valuable gifts you can’t pay for and avoid conflicts of interest. But ultimately, remaining independent is “more a matter of psychic discipline than anything else.”

    9. Focus on the next story
    10. One of the most common myths of reporting is that the work is easier for the journalist in the cubicle next to you, Leibovich said. In fact, it’s a slog for nearly everyone.

      Even with a well-received book, a portfolio of trenchant profiles and a job at The New York Times, Leibovich says he constantly fears doing crummy work. And that — combined with an appreciation for the fun he gets to have — gets him into the office every day.

      “What gets me out of bed is the next story,” Leibovich said. “I live very much in fear of not doing good stories. So I guess there will always be that.”

      The best journalists are restless, never satisfied, and thirsty to prove that their record of accomplishments isn’t just dumb luck, he said.

      “On some level, all of us tend to believe that every success we’ve ever had in the field has been a fluke,” Leibovich said in an email to Poynter. “We need to work even harder the next time to prevent this fraud we’re perpetrating on the world from being exposed.”

      Mark Leibovich is the author of the forthcoming book “Citizens of the Green Room,” due out Nov. 13

    Read more
  • Tough times at McClatchy — A quarterly loss and four assets sold

    McClatchy closed the books today on a rocky third quarter with an earnings report yesterday showing a small loss of $2.6 million (1 percent on revenues of $277.6 million).

    But CEO Pat Talimantes instead opened the conference call with analysts offering commentary on a much bigger issue, what he described as “important events that have sealed our financial flexibility.”

    An unfriendly commentator might describe those “events” as a yard sale. So far in 2014, McClatchy has sold four separate and substantial assets. The largest of them, in a deal with Gannett closed the first week in October, was a 25.6 percent stake in Classified Ventures’ Cars.com, which will bring in $631.8 million before taxes, $406 million after.

    Earlier this year McClatchy sold its stake in Apartments.com (another part of Classified Ventures)  It also sold its half of McClatchy/Tribune Information Services to Tribune and the Alaska Daily News to wealthy investor Alice Rogoff.  Those transactions generated another $181 million.

    Talamantes said the cash infusion will go to investments in “digital transformation” and to pay down some high-interest (9 percent) debt.

    On the operating side McClatchy had a year-to-year third quarter decline in advertising of 8.2 percent. Print advertising was down 11 percent. Though national advertising makes up only a small part of the total (about 7 percent), it was off 23.2 percent for the quarter compared to 2013, which was not a good year for national either.

    Trends were better in audience revenues and remaining digital businesses, Talamantes said. With continuing diversification the company now gets 64 percent of revenue from categories other than print advertising.

    Under questioning from analysts, Talamantes said McClatchy was unlikely to acquire any of the 76 Digital First papers or others up for sale. “We would rather invest n opportunities in our markets … (with) greater digital resources.”

    McClatchy continues an affiliation agreement with Cars.com and Apartments.com., but going forward it will need to split some the proceeds of sales with the new owners, thus reducing the revenue it realizes.

    Also, while McClatchy will continue to look for savings, he declined to predict that expenses will fall in t he fourth quarter or in early 2015. Digital transformation is essential, Talamantes said, “and that requires some investment.”

    For the day, McClatchy shares were up slightly in mid-afternoon trading. However they have now lost roughly half their value from a 2014 high April 2 of $6.81. Other newspaper-only stocks including the New York Times Company (which has sold many non-core assets in recent years)  and Lee Communications have declined in value since the spring but not nearly so much.

    Read more
  • Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, Anders Gyllenhaal, Alexandra Zayas among additions to Poynter’s National Advisory Board

    The Poynter Institute announced Thursday the addition of five journalism leaders to its National Advisory Board, including Arthur Gregg Sulzberger, senior editor for strategy at The New York Times and Anders Gyllenhaal, vice president of news at the McClatchy Company.

    Each of the board members have gained widespread recognition for their work and developed reputations as journalism innovators, Poynter president Tim Franklin said in a release accompanying the announcement.

    “They’ll be invaluable partners for Poynter as we transform the institute to make it even more relevant and useful for media executives, practitioners, educators and students,” Franklin said. “We’ll benefit greatly from having their expertise and knowledge on the advisory board.”

    The new members will each serve two-year terms on the 10-person board, which advises Poynter’s faculty and staff on trends shaping various media industries. They replace current board members whose terms expire at the beginning of the year.

    Here’s the full list of new board members:

    • Arthur Gregg Sulzberger: Sulzberger is the primary author of The New York Times innovation report and the senior editor for strategy at The New York Times.
    • Anders Gyllenhaal: Gyllenhaal is the vice president of news at the McClatchy Company and former editor of the Miami Herald (2007 to 2010) and the Minnseapolis Star Tribune (2002 to 2007).
    • Lori Bergen: Bergen is the dean of the J. William and Mary Diederich College of Communication at Marquette University and was named 2014 Journalism and Mass Communication Administrator of the Year by the Scripps Howard Foundation. She is also the incoming president of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.
    • Emilio Garcia-Ruiz: As managing editor of digital at The Washington Post, Garcia-Ruiz is The Post’s chief strategist for digital execution and the newsroom’s top liaison with business operations for digital programs.
    • Alexandra Zayas: Zayas, a reporter for The Tampa Bay Times, has won several prizes for her investigative reporting, including the Selden Ring Award for Investigative Reporting, the Livingston Award for Young Journalists and the Casey Medal for Meritorious Journalism. She was a 2013 Pulitzer finalist for a series of stories that investigated abusive conditions at unlicensed religious group homes.

    The following members are leaving Poynter’s National Advisory Board at the beginning of the year:

    • Philip Bennett, director of the DeWitt Wallace Center for Media and Democracy at Duke University.
    • David Boardman, dean of Temple University’s School of Media and Communication.
    • Mónica Guzmán, a columnist at The Seattle Times.
    • David Nordfors, president and co-founder of IIIJ.
    • Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute.
    Read more
SPC Winners Announced
Written by Josh Cradduck   
Thursday, 08 May 2014 00:40

 

The following is a list of the first and second place winners as announced at the Syracuse Press Club's 36th Annual Professional Recognition Awards and Scholarship Dinner. The event was held Saturday, May 3rd at Drumlins Country Club in Syracuse. Read on for the list!

2013 categories

RADIO

SPOT NEWS

First place: WRVO-FM, Joanna Richards, “North Country scraping its way out of blanket of ice”

Judges’ comments: Great example of spot news that is immediately useful to the listener, while undated enough to last a few hours. Nice job keeping the storm in perspective.

Second place: WRVO-FM, Ryan Delaney and Ellen Abbott, “Drone crashes into Lake Ontario; military finds pieces”

Judges’ comments: Well done and thorough coverage throughout the day. The supplement of frequent online updates makes it even stronger.

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

First place: WRVO-FM, Ryan Delaney, “‘Totalitarian’ culture and pay questions at Upstate Hospital”

Judges’ comments: Nice use of FOI to further the story. Also good supporting materials online, including sharing relevant documents obtained through the FOI request.

Second place: WRVO-FM, Ryan Delaney, “Remington Arms in a post-SAFE Act New York”

Judges’ comments: Solid coverage over time of the facts, speculations and emotions of gun control.

NEWS FEATURE

First place: WAER-FM, Chris Bolt, “Local company embodies history of prosthetics”

Judges’ comments: Well done two-part story, with entertaining elements about the family's growth and educational elements about prosthetics. A good listen!

Second place: WRVO-FM, Joanna Richards, “A behind-the-scenes look at a day in the life of a Fort Drum soldier”

Judges’ comments: Nice story telling and use of nat sound

 

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

 

First place: WAER-FM, John Smith, “Everson museum ‘exhibits’ the art of the game”

Judges’ comments: This story is a lot of fun with efficient use of great sound!

Second place: WAER-FM, Chris Bolt, “Music legend Garland Jeffries returns to Syracuse and his musical roots”

Judges’ comments: Great use of sound and story telling to reveal a local legend.

SPORTS STORY

First place: WAER-FM, Gabe Altieri, “Julian Whigham: Football player battles with esophageal disease”

Judges’ comments: Extremely well-rounded human interest sports feature. Nice work!

Second place: WRVO-FM, Gino Geruntino, “Cortland finds economic partner in Jets”

SPORTS SHOW

First place: WAER-FM, Gabe Altieri and Evan Weston, “Countdown to kickoff: Pregame for Syracuse University in the Texas Bowl”

Judges’ comments: Outstanding production value, with use of live, pre-produced and archival audio. A great listen!

Second place: WAER-FM, Matt Appel and Marc Weber, “SportsNight: ACC Conference on the rise”

REGULARLY SCHEDULED LOCAL NEWSCAST

First place: WAER-FM, Scott Willis and Chris Bolt, “Local newscast of July 17, 2013”

Judges’ comments: Well-rounded newscast with a variety of coverage, phone and field tape. Nice representation of what we should all do every day.

Second place: WRVO-FM, WRVO news department and Jason Smith, “November 6 – morning newscasts”

Judges’ comments: Thorough election coverage for a large and diverse region, nice work.

DOCUMENTARY

First place: WRVO-FM, Garrick Utley, Sidsel Overgaard, Catherine Loper and Mark Lavonier, “New York in the new world”

Judges’ comments: This program is truly welcoming, literally and figuratively. It is highly produced with care, is well-written and takes the listener on a journey of New York State, past and present.

Second place: WRVO-FM, Catherine Loper and Mark Lavonier, “Government funding of health care in upstate New York”

Judges’ comments: Great coverage!

PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM

First place: WRVO-FM, Lorraine Rapp, Linda Lowen, Catherine Loper and Leah Landry, “Take Care: I-STOP – the pros and cons of New York state’s new law regulating prescription drug abuse”

Judges’ comments: Take Care is full of useful and accessible segments. It makes meaningful sense of health issues that matter to the community.

Second place: WAER-FM (freelance), Allie Wenner, “East Side Spotlight”

Judges’ comments: Excellent use of sound to tell relevant public affairs stories.

DAILY PRINT MEDIA

SPOT NEWS

First place: The Post-Standard, Staff, “Nightmare at suburban mall”

Judges’ comments: A harrowing story well told. You can feel the community's anguish.

Second place: The Post-Standard, Sean Kirst, “On the Thruway: Flames, destruction and a crushed door – and then it opened”

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

First place: The Post-Standard, Michelle Briedenbach, “Live from New York: State to give $420 million in tax credits this year to movies, TV studios”

Judges’ comments: Excellent job of explaining the issue and revealing the lengths the state went to to hide the information about the tax credits. Also good explanation comparing New York's practice in context with other states.

Second place: The Post-Standard, Marnie Eisenstadt and staff, “Behind the pattern of breakdowns in electronic ankle monitors that allowed murder/child rape”

NEWS FEATURE / SERIES

First place: The Post-Standard, Paul Riede, “Say Yes at 5: Progress in Syracuse schools? Officials see hope despite spotty academic gains”

Judges’ comments: Exhaustively researched and well written, this series succeeds in describing the program as well as analyzing the issues still facing it.

Second place: The Post-Standard, Dave Tobin and Charley Hannigan, “Missing $808,000 isn't only mystery surrounding Auburn teachers union official's suicide”

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

First place: The Post-Standard, Dave Tobin, “A prodigy's promise: A young violinist's family flees China and dazzles here”

Judges’ comments: None

Second place: The Post-Standard, Marnie Eisenstadt, “Syracuse chef gives up his restaurant to feed the homeless”

SPORTS STORY

First place: The Post-Standard, Mike Waters, “Syracuse basketball assistant Mike Hopkins opens up about USC job, relationship with Jim Boeheim” 

Judges’ comments: None

Second place: The Post-Standard, Chris Carlson, “Final Four 2013: A visit with Fab Melo, who could've been with Syracuse in Atlanta right now”

NON-DAILY PRINT MEDIA

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

First place: Syracuse New Times, Carol Thompson, “The Road in Hannibal”

Judges’ comments: A top-notch, in-depth look at a very questionable action by a public official. What was most impressive was that the reporting led to public action. Great job!

Second place: The Valley News, Carol Thompson, “Another questionable bid surfaces in county”

Judges’ comments: An interesting series that looks into questionable bid processes. The writer is dogged in her pursuit of the truth -- nicely done.

NEWS FEATURE / SERIES

First place: Eagle Star-Review, Sarah Hall, “Becoming Drew”

Judges’ comments: Compelling story, sensitively told.

Second place: Syracuse New Times, Fred Fiske and Michael Davis, “Commies”

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

First place: Catholic Sun, Claudia Mathis, “Project Rachel Ministry offers healing”

Judges’ comments: Not only is this story well written but it reaches out to women who might be silently suffering.

Second place: Eagle Star-Review, Sarah Hall, “The bigger picture”

SPORTS STORY

First place: Syracuse New Times, Stephen Cohen, “The Other Guys”

Judges’ comments: A great contextual piece that puts an alternative face on a highly public event. The reporting is sharp. The storytelling is compelling. And the writing is engaging. Nicely done.

Second place: Urban CNY, Russ Tarby, “Robinson remembered/black cat incident recalled”

Judges’ comments: A strong story that mixes history with the present day. It was engaging from the first to last sentence.

SPECIAL INTEREST PRINT MEDIA

MAGAZINE

First place: The Stand, Staff, “Vox/Voz”

Judges’ comments: None

Second place: CNY Good Life, Linda Bien and Peter Allen, “July/August”

ALL PRINT

COLUMN

First place: Syracuse New Times, Jeff Kramer, “Kramer at the White House”

Judges’ comments: Kramer puts us right there shaking hands with the president of the United States, humorously capturing all the ceremonial pomp and personal panic of the occasion.

Second place: Eagle Star-Review, Sarah Hall, “Still in our hearts, 20 years later”

 

CRITIQUE

 

First place: The Post-Standard, Chris Baker, “Why hip-hop in Syracuse gets an unfair rap”

Judges’ comments: The writer offered a fresh look that causes the reader to think differently about the subject. This is a great example of how a critique can make people really think about the subject matter in a different light.

Second place: The Reporter, Rabbi Rachel Esserman, “Secrets in Berlin”

Judges’ comments: A great lead can make or break any story. The writer understands that well and uses it to set the scene for a powerful piece. Great job!

 

EDITORIAL

 

First place: The Post-Standard, Steve Carlic, “Brad Hulett’s Taser arrest: He deserves an apology and the public deserves an explanation”

Judges’ comments: Solid job of calling out police and jail officials for flagrant abuse of a citizen.

Second place: The Post-Standard, Marie Morelli, “Eminent domain the last, best hope for freeing the Hotel Syracuse”

 

HEADLINE WRITING

 

First place: Syracuse New Times, Bill DeLapp (entry No. 1)

Judges’ comments: Clever and apt wordplay yield bright headlines that grow naturally from these stories, drawing in readers with unforced charm.

Second place: The Post-Standard, Sonja Duntley

Judges’ comments: "Pass the peace" is delicious wordplay, while the dolphin and dark headlines deliver the unexpected to win over readers' curiosity.

FEATURE PHOTO

First place: The Post-Standard, Dennis Nett, “Slamma Jamma”

Judges’ comments: This a great action show made stronger with the shadow of the player. The photo demonstrates how strong black and white photography can be.

Second place: The Post-Standard, Kevin Rivoli, “Lemonade Stand”

Judges’ comments: Nicely framed feature shot of the "double team" of lemonade sellers

PHOTO ESSAY

First place: Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis, “State Fair”

Judges’ comments: The many images capture the many delights at the state fair.

Second place: Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis, “Saratoga”

SPORTS PHOTO

First place: Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis, “Ostrich racing”

Judges’ comments: Almost flying through the air, if Ostriches could fly!

Second place: Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis, “SU basketball coach Jim Boeheim”

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

First place: Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis, “Firudo”

Judges’ comments: This photo is good enough to eat. Photographer took a crisp shot with sharp color and detail.

Second place: None

PORTRAIT

First place: Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis, “Greg Davis sings”

Judges’ comments: A moment's musical ecstasy captured.

Second place: Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis, “Communist”

FRONT PAGE DESIGN:

First place: The Post-Standard, Susan Santola

Judges’ comments: The page design is very clean and easy to read. The use of color adds pop to the page and draws the reader's eye right in.

Second place: The Catholic Sun, Willie Putmon

Judges’ comments: Clean design with nice use of typography. The pages are easy to read and also attractive to look at.

GRAPHICS/ART ILLUSTRATION

First place: CNY Good Life, Peter Allen, “CNY Observer – July/August”

Judges’ comments: Nicely captures the mood of the article.

Second place: CNY Good Life, Peter Allen, “CNY Observer – Sept/Oct”

Judges’ comments: A good job encapsulating the mood of the story.

TELEVISION CATEGORIES

SPOT NEWS

First place: CNY Central, Laura Hand and Andy Wolf, “Mudslide closed portion of Route 20 in Madison County”

Judges’ comments: Excellent reporting and clear presentation of facts. The story was reported in both an informative and a creative way to really engage the viewer. Overall, a very strong entry.

Second place: CNY Central, Katie Corrado, “Gushing waters force evacuations in Oneida area”

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

First place: WSYR TV, Leigh Isaacson and Scott Irving, “School chemical explosion”

Judges’ comments: The burn photos and Skype interview were great extras which put this report above the rest.

Second place: WWNY TV, Asa Stackel, “Common Core”

NEWS FEATURE

First place: YNN, Brian Dwyer, “A Day on the Farm”

Judges’ comments: Excellent production values and great use of sound. Bravo!

Second place: WKTV, Allison Norlian and Tom Geise, “Sex offenders on Halloween”

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

First place: WBNG-TV, Perry Russom, “Binghamton Youth Orchestra: Symphony of Sound”

Judges’ comments: This piece is a great human interest story. Not only does the reporter have a firm grasp on dynamic story telling, but the piece was put together in a visually stimulating manner. Well done.

Second place: YNN, Brian Dwyer and R.D. White, “The Battle of Sacketts Harbor”

SPORTS STORY

First place: WENY-TV, Andy Malnoske, “Cold silence: Elmira goalie Jeff Mansfield”

Judges’ comments: Wonderful synthesis of sound, framing and movement to tell a moving story.

Second place: CNY Central, Kellie Cowan, “Gallaudet football’s Cinderella season”

Judges’ comments: Amazing story, artfully told.

SPORTS SHOW

First place: WSYR-TV, WSYR-TV Sports Department, “Rewind and reload: Tournament edition”

Judges’ comments: Polished performances, great context and interviews beyond the usual rah-rah stuff. Nailed it!

Second place: YNN, Staff, “ACC Football 101”

Judges’ comments: Smart packaging, smooth delivery, good variety in presenting information makes this engaging.

VIDEO JOURNALISM

First place: YNN, Katie Gibas

Judges’ comments: Creative and well-written pieces.

Second place: WENY-TV, Andy Malnoske

VIDEO ESSAY

First place: WSYR-TV, Jim Kearns, “Jiu Jitsu donations”

Judges’ comments: Great production values and packaging.

Second place: CNY Central, Lewis Karpel, “Super DIRT Week is back at Brewerton Speedway”

SPECIAL PROGRAM

First place: WSYR-TV, Carrie Lazarus, Shawn Wayson, Jessica Purchiaroni, “Class of 2013”

Judges’ comments: Great insight into the graduating class of 2013. This is a nice way to highlight their accomplishments, as well as hear the thoughts of our future leaders. This could have been a very fluffy piece, but it has some good substance to it.

Second place: YNN, Staff, “Live from the Fair”

Judges’ comments: Good mix of lighter stories and harder news.

ONLINE JOURNALISM CATEGORY

MULTIMEDIA STORY

First place: Syracuse.com, Dave Tobin, “A prodigy’s promise: A young violinist’s family flees China and dazzles here”

Judges’ comments: Good use of all elements--words, photos and video--to tell the amazing and inspiring story of a child prodigy violinist; This deserves future follow-up,

Second place: WAER.com, Chris Bolt, “Cycling the Erie Canal: Ride along with the tour”

Judges’ comments: A picturesque journey without leaving your chair. Great photos and good copy capture what it is like to cycle along the Erie Canal.

NEWS WEBSITE

First place: 9wsyr.com, LocalSyr.com

Judges’ comments: This was a difficult category to judge since all of the websites are attractive and informative. This one provides users with a complete packages...right down to streaming.

Second place: Syracuse New Times, syracusenewtimes.com

Judges’ comments: Attractive, colorful homepage grabs the user's attention.

BLOG

First place: urbancny.com, Ken Jackson, “The Hall Monitor”

Judges’ comments: Not only is Ken a good writer, but he's not afraid to tackle thought provoking topics that many in his audience may not agree with. A refreshing voice.

Second place: syracuse.com, Kevin Rivoli, “Photographer’s journal”

Judges’ comments: This blog focuses attention on a problem that is always with society but is too often swept aside. Combination of words and photos are powerful.

PUBLIC RESOURCES

First place: WSYR-FM, OnTheLookout.net

Judges’ comments: This site is a real public service. It enables the general public to keep on top of crimes news and perhaps provide information to the police. The site itself is colorful, well-designed an easy to navigate. The mugs shots are scary, but helpful!

Second place: None

Student Contest

BEST NEWS STORY

First place: The Newshouse, Tyler Greenawalt, Andrew Renneisen and Ethan Backer, “Obama promotes higher education reform in speech at Henninger High School”

Judges’ comments: Excellent online written coverage of Obama's visit, fairly presenting the President's views on education as well as those of a few dissenters. Excellent photos of the event, dramatically presented online

Second place: The Oswegonian, Patrick Malowski, “Students chalk up Tyler Hall for Banned Books Week”

Judges’ comments: Dramatic and colorful video report on the important subject of banned books. Crisply edited with well-composed shots. Well-written naration.

BEST SPORTS STORY

First place: The Newshouse, Alison Joy, Lauren Teng, Callan Gray and Joe Diglio, “The Freshman Philosopher”

Judges’ comments: Beautifully done. Touching music. Wonderful and likable subject. And treated with great tenderness and respect.

Second place: NCC News, Kevin Fitzgerald, “Hoops Parity”

Judges’ comments: Informative and funny, professional, very well produced with great music. Very nice.

BEST FEATURE STORY

First place: The Newshouse, Andrew Renneisen, “Caring for Doug”

Judges’ comments: Moving account of a dedicated wife who cares for her husband after he suffers a major stroke. Video is moving and enhances the online post.

Second place: The Newshouse, Allie Caren, “In their shoes”

BEST MULTIMEDIA STORY

First place: The Newshouse, staff, “Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow: The legacy of Pan Am Flight 103”

Judges’ comments: Very well-done and thorough handling of a very sensitive topic. Excellent use of multi-media one would have expected from a professional newspaper. Bravo!

Second place: The Oswegonian, Patrick Malowski, “Students, campus leaders weigh entertainment vs. harm of SUNY Party Stories”

Judges’ comments: Fantastic and fascinating story. Good use of video. And it will be interesting to see if this phenomenon spreads to other colleges. Great job! 

 

"Give light and the people will find their own way."
SCRIPPS-HOWARD newspapers, motto.

Wall of Distinction


Bill Carey

News 10 Now

WIXT

WTVH

WHEN
It’s late October, and it is test time in the WHEN radio newsroom. News Director Bill Carey is quizzing his staff of young reporters on their homework.
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