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Poynter.
  • Reporter quits Sun-Times, cites ‘chilling effect in the newsroom’

    Dave McKinney’s blog | Crain’s Chicago Business

    Chicago Sun-Times reporter Dave McKinney has resigned from the newspaper, saying, “I’m convinced this newspaper no longer has the backs of reporters like me” in a letter to Michael Ferro, chairman of Sun-Times owner Wrapports LLC.

    McKinney was the paper’s Springfield bureau chief and was suspended for five days last week after a Republican gubernatorial candidate, Bruce Rauner, complained about a story on which he co-bylined, because he’s married to a Democratic consultant.

    In his post, McKinney calls that suspension “a kind of house arrest that lasted almost a week” and says “It was pure hell.” The Sun-Times later broke with its recent tradition of not endorsing candidates and endorsed Rauner, who is a former investor in Wrapports.

    “Readers of the Sun-Times need to be able to trust the paper,” McKinney writes. He continues:

    They need to know a wall exists between owners and the newsroom to preserve the integrity of what is published. A breach in that wall exists at the Sun-Times.

    It’s had a chilling effect in the newsroom. While I don’t speak for my colleagues, I’m aware that many share my concern.

    Some tweets from colleagues:

    I've never worked with a finer, more respected journalist that @davemckinney123 – before, during and after this episode.

    — Craig Newman (@craignewman) October 22, 2014

    @davemckinney123 Proud to have worked with you, Dave.

    — Tim Novak (@tnovaksuntimes) October 22, 2014

    You'd read his Blago work in j-school and say "this is how I want to do it" http://t.co/60jXtGhsIK

    — Brandon Wall (@Walldo) October 22, 2014

    Read more
  • Billy Penn launches desktop, mobile sites

    Billy Penn

    Jim Brady’s new local-news startup, Billy Penn, launched Wednesday, carrying a note saying its site is still in beta.

    The homepage currently features Philadelphia stories mostly drawn from other news outlets, although there are two stories reported by Billy Penn reporters and curators.

    The homepage of Billy Penn's desktop site.

    The homepage of Billy Penn’s desktop site.

    Although the site debuted Wednesday, Billy Penn has been building a following on email and social media in advance of the launch. The news organization has been on Twitter and Facebook for a couple months and has been delivering a weekday newsletter to subscribers for the past five weeks, according to an introductory letter from Billy Penn Editor Chris Krewson and Brady.

    RELATED: Brady takes another shot at local journalism with new venture

    The letter also lays out a few fundamental guiding principles for the site. Among them: the staff will link out to stories rather than over-aggregating the work of others; the site will allow audience members to track specific stories using a “follow” button that will send out relevant email alerts; and that it will eschew comments for the time being (“It’s our opinion that interaction is moving into a ‘post-comments’ period”). The site’s advertising section notes that Billy Penn will offer native advertising as well as “in moment” ads and themed sponsorships.

    This is Brady’s second attempt at starting up a local news site in a large metropolitan city. He presided over the creation of TBD in 2010, but that venture did not last very long.

    Read more
  • How newspapers connect the Royals’ World Series appearances

    Last Wednesday evening, I watched the status updates tick through my Facebook feed. I was on my 30-minute dinner break at my part-time bookseller job, away from television and radio. I posted a status update asking friends to keep their own updates coming, that I knew we – in this instance, the Kansas City Royals – were close.

    An office building in Kansas City after the Royals won the ALCS. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    An office building in Kansas City after the Royals won the ALCS. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    After my shift ended, I checked my phone once again, and I chuckled at The New York Times news alert that confirmed what I had already known for three hours. Headline: “Royals Keep Rolling, and Advance to the World Series.” The first paragraph read even more humorous: “After going 29 years without playing a single postseason game, the Kansas City Royals are making up for a lot of wasted time.”

    And during that long stretch of nothing between 1985 and 2014, there was one common thread to the experience of watching the Royals cause intermittent euphoria: Newspapers.

    My parents attended Game 6 in Kansas City on Oct. 26, 1985, a little less than two months before I was born. There’s a photograph of me in 1986 wearing a Royals outfit at 4 months old. But I didn’t really get introduced to the magnitude of the Royals’ eventual series win until I found a cardboard box in the basement.

    My father had collected stadium plastic cups, ticket stubs, programs, and at least two World Series shirts. The box also holds lots and lots of newspapers.

    I had called my dad that Wednesday afternoon to see if he wanted me to get him a copy of The Kansas City Star in the morning. My full-time job starts at 3:30 a.m. each day, and I knew that I would need to hit the rounds of gas stations at my soonest possible morning break if I were to get one. (One of my Facebook friends, aged 30, posted a Facebook photo at 7:50 a.m. Thursday of his stack of copies, proudly proclaiming that he had cleaned out the nearest 7-Eleven and was looking forward to one day passing along the copies to his future children and grandchildren.)

    No need: Dad’s been buying them at the gas station throughout the last month’s ride, not just Thursday’s “World Class” issue.

    "World class." Your @KCStar front page on the #Royals reaching the World Series. pic.twitter.com/3Mx2VWZrpG

    — Charles Gooch (@drgooch41) October 16, 2014

    Last Thursday I asked him why he still buys the papers.

    He likes the articles about the different players, the in-depth profiles, not just of the Royals but also for the San Francisco Giants.

    I ask when he thinks we stopped subscribing to the Star at our house, two hours west of Kansas City in Wamego, Kansas. He doesn’t remember taking it in the first place when I was growing up. I laugh and tell him that of course we did. I read “FYI,” the features section, from start to finish daily (and, if I skipped a day, I remember going back and getting caught up on my horoscopes, national music news and celebrity birthdays).

    My mind also turns to my late grandfather at this time. John DeWeese adored newspapers. He took both The Star and the Kansas City Times, which ceased publication in 1990. My grandmother’s kitchen table still bears the imprint of newspaper ink from where Pops read his papers every day.

    He’s been gone almost 15 years now. I wonder, what would Pops think of the Royals making it to the World Series? Would he share an interest in the Internet like my grandmother? More so, would he be sure to get a copy of each morning’s newspaper, even if the Royals were — as usual — having a mediocre season?

    I know for sure the answer to the last question. In 2008, one month after I graduated from Kansas State University with a degree in journalism, I pulled myself away from job applications and wandered into my grandmother’s basement, to my grandfather’s desk, which remains the same since his death in April 2000. There, his fill-in-the-blank desk calendar from 1997 is still sitting. Many of the dates’ questions remained blank, but I happened upon one date that asked, if he could go into any profession he wanted, what it would be.

    Journalism, he wrote in his near-perfect cursive.

    My mind jumps back to a block away, to my own childhood home, and the basement. I ask my father what editions are in the box – just World Series games, or all of the coverage leading up to the seven games?

    He’s not sure. The box might not even exist anymore, he says, laughing – it might have gotten thrown away.

    “Nah,” I say, with a laugh back. It has to be there. Nearby, in a similar box, there is a box filled with newspaper clippings and magazine issues paying tribute to Princess Diana, who died when I was in the sixth grade. Those are my mom’s.

    Greater Kansas City is now my home, and I’ve lived and worked on both sides of the state line. The former daily newspaper reporter in me is elated, to know that stands are selling out, that fans of all ages have rushed out to purchase their commemorative copies. I don’t want to be skeptical. I want to be in the here, in the now, celebrating the success of not only our baseball team but also the sales and general interest in the newspaper. I want this part of 1985 to stay with us permanently.

    It’s been 18 months since I’ve held the title of daily newspaper reporter, but my mind is weighed down with questions: How long will the sales momentum last? Is too much of a good thing ever bad? If it takes us another 29 years to make it to postseason play, will we still be able to purchase our tangible ink copies of celebration in the future?

    My five years of professional work experience in print journalism taught me patience, to take each deadline, each issue, each day as it comes, with grace and virtue and the hopes of getting to do it all over again in the next 24 hours. That is how I choose to answer my questions right now. What I do know – for now, at least – is that once the World Series is finished, I won’t go back and read through the Facebook status updates or the New York Times news alert that I forwarded to my family.

    I’ll go treasure hunting for that nearly 30-year-old cardboard box. Should it still exist, I’ll gingerly lift out the newspapers and hold the history in my hands. If they’re still around, part of me wants to properly archive them in acid-free folders as an early Christmas present to my father. Really, though, the box will remain where it is, perhaps gaining a new neighbor with the stories of 2014.

    Read more
SPC announces awards finalists
Written by Josh Cradduck   
Friday, 18 April 2014 12:40

The Syracuse Press Club would like to thank all of you for entering this year's 36th Annual Professional Recognition Awards Contest. Volunteers from numerous press clubs across America judged the entries and selected first- and second-place winners in numerous competitions in TV, radio, print, online and college journalism categories.

Please attend the awards banquet to collect your award or support your peers. In addition to the contest winners, we will honor at Drumlins local journalists receiving special club awards for professional standards, new journalist, scholarship and best news source. We will also be adding a well-deserving journalist to our Wall of Distinction. 

The Press Club’s contest is conducted completely digital by the Better Newspaper Contest.

To reserve a table for the dinner, please head to our website. Our reservations deadline is WEDNESDAY, APRIL 30th.

Please note the names of winners and media organizations are in random order.  We will announce at the May 3 awards dinner who won first and second place awards.

2013 categories

 

RADIO

SPOT NEWS

WRVO-FM, Ryan Delaney and Ellen Abbott

WRVO-FM, Joanna Richards

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

WRVO-FM, Ryan Delaney

WRVO-FM, Ryan Delaney

NEWS FEATURE

WRVO-FM, Joanna Richards

WAER-FM, Chris Bolt

 

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

WAER-FM, John Smith

WAER-FM, Chris Bolt

SPORTS STORY

WRVO-FM, Gino Geruntino

WAER-FM, Gabe Altieri

SPORTS SHOW

WAER-FM, Gabe Altieri and Evan Weston

WAER-FM, Matt Appel and Marc Weber

REGULARLY SCHEDULED LOCAL NEWSCAST

WRVO-FM, WRVO news department and Jason Smith

WAER-FM, Scott Willis and Chris Bolt

DOCUMENTARY

WRVO-FM, Garrick Utley, Sidsel Overgaard, Catherine Loper and Mark Lavonier

WRVO-FM, Catherine Loper and Mark Lavonier

PUBLIC AFFAIRS PROGRAM

WAER-FM (freelance), Allie Wenner

WRVO-FM, Lorraine Rapp, Linda Lowen, Catherine Loper and Leah Landry

DAILY PRINT MEDIA

SPOT NEWS

The Post-Standard, Staff

The Post-Standard, Sean Kirst

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

The Post-Standard, Marnie Eisenstadt and staff

The Post-Standard, Michelle Briedenbach

NEWS FEATURE / SERIES

The Post-Standard, Paul Riede

The Post-Standard, Dave Tobin and Charley Hannigan

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

The Post-Standard, Marnie Eisenstadt

The Post-Standard, Dave Tobin

SPORTS STORY

The Post-Standard, Mike Waters

The Post-Standard, Chris Carlson

NON-DAILY PRINT MEDIA

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

The Valley News, Carol Thompson

Syracuse New Times, Carol Thompson

NEWS FEATURE / SERIES

Eagle Star-Review, Sarah Hall

Syracuse New Times, Fred Fiske and Michael Davis

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

Eagle Star-Review, Sarah Hall

Catholic Sun, Claudia Mathis

SPORTS STORY

Syracuse New Times, Stephen Cohen

Urban CNY, Russ Tarby

SPECIAL INTEREST PRINT MEDIA

MAGAZINE

CNY Good Life, Linda Bien and Peter Allen

The Stand, Staff

ALL PRINT

COLUMN

Syracuse New Times, Jeff Kramer

Eagle Star-Review, Sarah Hall

CRITIQUE

The Reporter, Rabbi Rachel Esserman

The Post-Standard, Chris Baker

EDITORIAL

The Post-Standard, Steve Carlic

The Post-Standard, Marie Morelli

HEADLINE WRITING

The Post-Standard, Sonja Duntley

Syracuse New Times, Bill DeLapp

FEATURE PHOTO

The Post-Standard, Dennis Nett

The Post-Standard, Kevin Rivoli

PHOTO ESSAY

Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis

Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis

SPORTS PHOTO

Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis

Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis

PORTRAIT

Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis

Syracuse New Times, Michael Davis

FRONT PAGE DESIGN:

The Post-Standard, Susan Santola

The Catholic Sun, Willie Putmon

GRAPHICS/ART ILLUSTRATION

CNY Good Life, Peter Allen

CNY Good Life, Peter Allen

TELEVISION CATEGORIES

SPOT NEWS

CNY Central, Katie Corrado

CNY Central, Laura Hand and Andy Wolf

INVESTIGATIVE STORY

WSYR TV, Leigh Isaacson and Scott Irving

WWNY TV, Asa Stackel

NEWS FEATURE

WKTV, Allison Norlian and Tom Geise

TWC News, Brian Dwyer

"HUMAN INTEREST" FEATURE

WBNG-TV, Perry Russom

TWC News, Brian Dwyer and R.D. White

SPORTS STORY

CNY Central, Kellie Cowan

WENY-TV, Andy Malnoske

SPORTS SHOW

WSYR-TV, WSYR-TV Sports Department

YNN, Staff

VIDEO JOURNALISM

WENY-TV, Andy Malnoske

TWC News, Katie Gibas

VIDEO ESSAY

WSYR-TV, Jim Kearns

CNY Central, Lewis Karpel

SPECIAL PROGRAM

TWC News, Staff

WSYR-TV, Carrie Lazarus, Shawn Wayson and Jessica Purchiaroni

ONLINE JOURNALISM CATEGORY

MULTIMEDIA STORY

Syracuse.com, Dave Tobin

WAER.com, Chris Bolt

NEWS WEBSITE

Syracuse New Times, syracusenewtimes.com

9wsyr.com, LocalSyr.com

BLOG

urbancny.com, Ken Jackson

syracuse.com, Kevin Rivoli

PUBLIC RESOURCES

WSYR-TV, OnTheLookout.net

Student Contest

BEST NEWS STORY

The Oswegonian, Patrick Malowski

The Newshouse, Tyler Greenawalt, Andrew Renneisen and Ethan Backer

BEST SPORTS STORY

The Newshouse, Alison Joy, Lauren Teng, Callan Gray and Joe Diglio

NCC News, Kevin Fitzgerald

BEST FEATURE STORY

The Newshouse, Allie Caren

The Newshouse, Andrew Renneisen

BEST MULTIMEDIA STORY

The Newshouse, staff

The Oswegonian, Patrick Malowski

Last Updated ( Friday, 18 April 2014 13:04 )
 
"A composite is a euphemism for a lie. It’s disorderly. It’s dishonest and it’s not journalism."
---Fred W Friendly, Columbia School of Journalism

Wall of Distinction


Emanuel "Blair" Henderson Sr.

The Progressive Herald

Emmanuel Blair Henderson was a columnist for The Progressive Herald, an African-American newspaper in Syracuse during the 1940s and 1950s -- a time when black people weren't included as employees in mainstream media.
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