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Poynter.
  • ‘It ain’t necessarily so’: 7 quotes from Ben Bradlee in 1986

    In 1986, Poynter’s Newsleaders series filmed an interview with Ben Bradlee, then editor of The Washington Post. Bradlee died on Tuesday, October 21, at the age of 93.

    You can see the full interview, in which Bradlee talks about Watergate, the Pentagon Papers and his partnership with Katharine Graham.

    Here are seven things he said from that interview in 1986. Let’s begin with the introduction, because, well, you’ll see.

    1. “It ain’t necessarily so.”

    2. “… A better informed world is a better world.”

    3. “The power of The Washington Post lies first and above all in the fact that it is published in the capital of the free world. It’s a geographic power. I mean, if we were in Omaha, we would not be as powerful as we are.”

    4. “If I meet someone new, it’s odds on that they’ll say, ‘well you don’t look like Jason Robards.’”

    5. “I’m more worried about the relationship of the press and government, to working that out, rather than I am worried about the relationship of the press and the public. I think the public eventually works that out pretty well, it seems to me.”


    6. “We’ve got a lot of jobs to do but one of them is not be loved. We don’t have to be loved. We have to be respected, I think.”

    7. “I hope people will be sorry that I’ve gone, will be appreciative of what I’ve tried to do, but I think it will be a blip.”

    Read more
  • Jessica Hopper is the new editor of Pitchfork’s print magazine

    Pitchfork has named Jessica Hopper the editor-in-chief of The Pitchfork Review, a quarterly print magazine about music and culture. Hopper will also be a senior editor at Pitchfork’s daily site, she said in a phone call with Poynter.

    Jessica Hopper (Photograph by David Sampson)

    Jessica Hopper (Photograph by David Sampson)

    “It’s a very special, novel thing,” Hopper said about The Pitchfork Review. “It’s a music magazine about music.”

    “We’re definitely excited for Jessica to join the staff full-time as senior editor of the website and Editor in Chief of The Pitchfork Review,” Pitchfork Editor-in-Chief Mark Richardson told Poynter in an email. “She’s known quite a few people on staff for years from being in Chicago, and we’ve all been following her writing for a long time before that. Beyond her talent, she’s a fountain of ideas and enthusiasm.”

    In its first year the Review was edited by J.C. Gabel, who will still contribute to the magazine, Richardson said. Hopper’s first issue at the top of the masthead will feature a 20,000-word oral history of Jawbreaker written by Leor Galil, a photo essay about an open-air punk market in Mexico City and a piece by Eric Harvey that draws a connection between the early days of “reality rap” and the TV show “Cops.”

    Hopper said her plan is to do stuff “that’s like real music journalism, stuff that’s not even doable anymore because it doesn’t fit into people’s verticals.”

    The magazine will also do “longer pieces on contemporary artists that we think are going to be canonical,” Hopper said. Pitchfork President Chris Kaskie and Creative Director Mike Renaud, Hopper said, originally saw the magazine as “the kind of magazine where you pull it off the shelf in 10 years and you know who everybody is.”

    The Pitchfork gig is Hopper’s first full-time job as a music journalist; she’s been writing music criticism for nearly 20 years, beginning as the proprietor of the fanzine Hit It Or Quit It and collecting lots of freelance bylines along the way, at outlets like Spin, the Chicago Tribune, the Chicago Reader and Minneapolis City Pages. From 1995 to 2003, she ran her own music PR company, representing acts including the Dismemberment Plan, the Gossip and At the Drive-In.

    She will no longer be Rookie’s music editor once she begins at Pitchfork but will still write about non-music stuff for that publication — “Rookie is my spiritual home, always,” Hopper said.

    A collection of Hopper’s criticism, “The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic,” is due out next May on Featherproof Books, which is run by Tim Kinsella, a member of the great Chicago bands Cap’n Jazz and Joan of Arc. Rolling Stone writer Rob Sheffield will write an intro for the book, Hopper said, whose title is “kind of a joke” that also points out “the absurdity that at the very least, [NPR music critic] Ann Powers and half a dozen other people should be ahead of me on this one.”

    The magazine has a print circulation of 10,000 and a single sponsor for each issue. The Pitchfork staff is “very democratic,” Hopper said several times. I asked her about the preponderance of dudes on its masthead. “My experience has been that it’s a place that’s been very welcoming to women and to feminist ideas,” Hopper said. “I wouldn’t be there otherwise. I couldn’t be there otherwise! I feel very respected there.”

    Hopper called criticism her “nerd depot” and said she looks forward to helping inexperienced writers refine their voices, giving them the types of edits that are hard to dole out at hyperactive Web publications. “I was lucky that I was getting top edits from Kiki Yablon that made me cry for two years,” she said, referring to the Chicago Reader’s former managing editor and later editor.

    Other editors she credits as influences: Will Hermes, Charles Aaron, Steve Kandell and Alison True. They taught her “how to write by showing me what I was doing wrong,” she said. “Because of the state of music journalism, you’re lucky if you get a top edit that’s more than somebody running spellcheck on your stuff.”

    The Review doesn’t review records. When it does do criticism, it will tend to be longform, Hopper said, something that benefits artists as well as writers who want to stretch out: “What fun is it having a record come out and feeling like no one understands it enough to write about it properly?” she said.

    Read more
  • Pew: 4 in 10 Internet users have experienced online harassment

    Pew Research Center

    Women are more likely to experience severe forms of harassment online, according to a Pew survey, and 65 percent of both men and women between ages 18 and 29 have experienced some form of online harassment.

    pewwomenharassment

    Overall, 4 in 10 Internet users have experienced online harassment, while 73 percent have seen it happen to others.

    Online harassment is especially pronounced at the intersection of gender and youth: women ages 18-24 are more likely than others to experience some of the more severe forms of harassment. They are particularly likely to report being stalking online (26% said so) and sexually harassed (25%). In addition, they are also the targets of other forms of severe harassment like physical threats (23%) and sustained harassment (18%) at rates similar to their male peers (26% of whom have been physically threatened and 16% of whom have been the victim of sustained harassment).

    Most online harassment takes place on social media sites: “66% of internet users who have experienced online harassment said their most recent incident occurred on a social networking site or app,” Pew reports. The second-most commonly mentioned source of recent harassment, at 22 percent, was online comment sections. Women were more likely to cite social media as a source of harassment:

    Fully 73% of women who have experienced online harassment said their most recent incident occurred on social networking sites or apps, compared with 59% of men. Men were more likely to cite the comments section of a website as the site of their most recent harassment – 21% of harassed men vs. 11% of harassed women.

    pewanonymity

    While 63 percent of respondents agreed the Internet allows people to be more anonymous, fully 92 percent said it allows people to be more critical of others. Over half of those who have been harassed online said they didn’t know the identity of the person who harassed them. Reducing anonymity is a controversial way some news organizations have attempted to cut down on comment section vitriol.

    Follow @samkirkla
    !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');

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Awards presented for best CNY journalism of 2012

The Syracuse Press Club honored the best journalism of 2012 at an awards ceremony Saturday night at Drumlins Country Club, in Syracuse.

The club's 35th annual Scholarship and Professional Recognition Awards dinner honored exceptional work in local print, broadcast and online.

 Among the highlights of the evening,  broadcasters WCNY-TV, YNN, CNYCentral and Newschannel 9 shared a first place award in the Special Television Program category for their jointly produced special Protecting Our Children. It was a project aimed at the problem of physical and sexual abuse of children.

Also among the highlights of the evening, Syracuse.com won for best news website,  The Post-Standard won for spot news coverage.  The Binghamton Press and Sun Bulletin was honored for best investigative reporting in a daily newspaper. Carol Thompson of the Valley News won investigative in a non-daily paper. WAER FM 88 won for best newscast on radio, and Newschannel 9 at 5 won best newscast in television.

The evening was hosted by Post-Standard/Syracuse.com sports columnist Bud Poliquin and Newschannel 9 reporter Tammy Palmer.

The Press Club also honored several individuals for their body of work.   CNYCentral multi media journalist Tom Eschen won the A. Brohmann Roth Newcomer award.   Recently retired WKTV anchorman Bill Worden was honored with the Gus Bliven-JoeGanley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award. 

The club also honored two former Post-Standard journalists with the Selwyn Kershaw Professional Standards Award.  John Berry spent his career at the paper as an award winning photographer.   Toni Guidice was honored for her nearly 30 year career and high standards as a  copy editor for the paper.

Three individuals shared the Philip Hofmann President's Award for Best News Source.  Ken Heffernan and Joe Galloway, investigators with the Syracuse Fire Department and Kae Young, public affairs officer with the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum were honored for their efforts to provide journalists with the information they need to report the news in a timely fashion.

The Syracuse Press Club is also proud to present a $2,000 scholarship to Paul Valentino, a student graduating from Onondaga Community college.

The Syracuse Press Club would like to sincerely thank the journalists and news managers of our local media for their hard work, dedication to their craft, and their support of the club by participating in our awards competition and attending this dinner.  Your support makes this event possible and makes possible the presentation of a scholarship to a journalism student.

Click here for a PDF file of the 2012 winners.

 

Last Updated ( Monday, 06 May 2013 00:55 )
 
"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."
--Thomas Jefferson

Wall of Distinction


Rod Wood

WIXT

WHEN, WNDR

Club President: 1976

Rod Wood?s interest in news goes back to when he wrote and published a little neighborhood newspaper while he was still in elementary school in Syracuse.
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