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Poynter.
  • Washington Post to cut some non-newsroom staff

    The Washington Post

    The Washington Post has “decided to internally transfer or eliminate certain non-Newsroom positions,” publisher Fred Ryan said in a memo to staffers Monday.

    Ryan did not specify how many positions will be eliminated, but said the cuts come after “much careful deliberation” for the employees affected. Staffers who will be laid off have already been notified, he wrote.

    As of October 2014, The Washington Post had added about 100 employees since the paper was purchased by Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, Erik Wemple reported.

    Earlier in 2015, Washingtonian’s Andrew Beaujon reported that The Washington Post was taking steps to trim staff. A Post spokesperson told Washingtonian that net editorial staff would continue to grow in 2015.

    Here’s Ryan’s memo to employees:

    Washington Post Publisher Frederick J. Ryan, Jr. sent the following note to staff today:

    Dear Washington Post Colleagues,

    This week will mark six months since you welcomed me to this extraordinary publication. I’d like to take this opportunity to thank you for the warm reception I have received and to give you an update on several new initiatives underway.

    We have taken on an ambitious goal of vastly expanding our readership to a broader national and global audience. The results are impressive with our total digital audience expanding to over 48 million unique visitors last month, a record that marks 63% growth over last year. Our mobile audience grew to an all-time high exceeding 31 million unique visitors—an 80% increase over last year. This exceptional growth exceeds that of any of our key competitors.

    User engagement is high with our total page views nearing 500 million for the first time, which is 109% growth year over year. We are attracting one of the largest and fastest growing millennial audiences among major media outlets, an impressive sign that Washington Post journalism is becoming essential to a new generation of readers.

    These past few months, we have added to the strong Washington Post team with some incredibly talented new members. Steve Gibson, a highly respected media executive, has joined us as Chief Financial Officer and Jed Hartman, one of the most innovative and admired people in advertising today has signed on as Chief Revenue Officer. Recognizing internal excellence, Tracy Grant has been promoted to Deputy Managing Editor, Beth Diaz to Vice President of Audience Development & Analytics and Kris Coratti to Vice President of Communications – all terrific additions to the leadership team. Leili Boroumand joined us earlier this month as Director of Business Development and she has hit the ground running.

    To lead an expanded offering to the “leadership audience” of decision makers and influentials, the Newsroom has added to its ranks with well-regarded journalist Rachel Van Dongen. As leader of the business side of this important initiative, we are today announcing the hiring of Alex Treadway for the newly created position of Vice President of Leadership Market Sales.

    The excellence of Washington Post journalism has won many important accolades these past few months, with Carol Leonnig receiving the Polk Award for her outstanding reporting on weaknesses in Secret Service protection of the President; our late colleague, Michel du Cille, being honored by both the White House News Photographers Association and Photographer of the Year International award for his work on Ebola; our headline writers just received the top award from the American Copy Editors Society; and our design teams picked up an unprecedented 150 awards from the Society for News Design. Just last week Dan Balz was honored with the Toner Award for political reporting, and the American Society of News Editors Award for Distinguished Writing on Diversity went to Sari Horwitz.

    The Washington Post was named this month by Fast Company Magazine as the “Number One Most Innovative Media Company in the World.” We can all take pride in this great recognition of the culture of innovation and transformation underway at The Post.

    We are laser-focused on operating as a nimble, forward-looking company with a culture of innovation and swift implementation.

    As part of this transformation, we have undertaken a thoughtful analysis of our staff structure in non-Newsroom positions, to be certain that we are deploying our resources in ways consistent with today’s rapidly changing media model and our bold vision for the future. As a result, we have decided to internally transfer or eliminate certain non-Newsroom positions, where appropriate. That process has been concluded and most of those directly affected by these structural changes have already been notified. Decisions that eliminate or restructure positions are difficult to make and even harder to receive. We came to these decisions after much careful deliberation and with great appreciation for the colleagues who feel the impact of this realignment.

    The media world is changing at an even faster pace than ever before. To continue on our trajectory of growth and expansion, we must be in a constant state of transformation with the nimbleness and speed of execution to lead and innovate in this rapidly evolving space.

    As we pursue our ambitious expansion strategy, we will continue our investment in the Newsroom. Seventeen journalists have been hired in the first three months of the year and more to come. Among these new additions is Lois Romano, returning to lead an expanded Washington Post Live program. Later this week, we will be announcing the hiring of a new leader of PostTV, our major investment in video news production. The PostTV team has achieved dramatic growth this past year and is positioned for tremendous success going forward.

    Through the innovations of our world-class team of engineers, Washington Post content will expand to reach an even larger audience. Our new “Rainbow” national app that launched late last year on Fire tablet devices has been a tremendous success, with a large loyal audience coming to The Post through this new offering. The users on this new platform are sharing our exceptional journalism with others at unprecedented rates. We will be launching this new Rainbow national app on all other devices later this year, and expanding the experience to phones and beyond. For Post advertisers, this new Rainbow platform is becoming a “game changer,” with reader engagement at levels vastly exceeding traditional click through rates.

    We have taken internal ownership of our technology future and are rapidly building our own platforms, which has enabled us to innovate faster and provide higher-quality service to readers, advertisers, and the Newsroom. As you have observed over the past year, our technology team has made our site and apps faster, improved stability and reliability, and significantly enhanced our Newsroom’s storytelling capabilities. The Content Management System design initiative has been a huge success and we are offering this proprietary new CMS to select universities across the country with the intention to eventually license it to other publishers across the globe.

    This transformational thinking and spirit of innovation is reflected across all departments at The Post. Having recently spent time with the Production Facility and Delivery Teams, it is clear that innovation is at the center of everything they do. Our loyal print readership is an important priority to The Post and we will continue to serve them with a top-quality product on their doorstep each morning.

    From a financial standpoint, I am pleased to report that the company finished 2014 strong and, with the end of the first quarter upon us, 2015 is off to an excellent start.

    With so many wins in the first quarter alone, we have every reason to feel excited about what the rest of the year holds. But we cannot take our foot off the accelerator—we must continue to be unrelenting in our focus on the innovation and dedication to excellence that is leading to these achievements.

    I’d like to thank all of you for your hard work, dedication and focus on the future. Our next Town Hall is set for Wednesday, April 8, where we can discuss these and other initiatives in more detail. I hope you can make it and look forward to seeing you there.

    Best regards,

    Fred.

    Read more
  • Minimum wage worker fired after talking to The Washington Post

    The Washington Post

    Shanna Tippen, a Days Inn employee who was featured prominently in a Washington Post story about an increase of the minimum wage, was fired from her job by the hotel manager soon after the story ran. Chico Harlan, the author of the original story and a follow-up, explains:

    Tippen says she was fired by her boss, hotel manager Herry Patel. Earlier that day, Patel had called the Post to express frustration that he had been quoted giving his opinion about the minimum wage hike. (He objected to it.) It was soon after, Tippen says, that Patel found her in the lobby and fired her.

    Tippen’s boss berated her for talking to The Washington Post, calling the decision “stupid and dumb,” and asked why Harlan decided to write the story. Harlan writes that Tippen’s boss was the one who suggested he speak to her, and even talked to him for “several minutes”:

    Several days later, after I’d spent additional time with Tippen, Patel called me and threatened to sue if an article was published. Tippen, though, felt it was important to tell her story; she said many people shared her experience earning the minimum, and she had nothing negative to say about her employer.​

    Read more
  • Kinsey Wilson named executive vice president of product and technology at The New York Times

    The New York Times

    The New York Times on Monday announced that Kinsey Wilson, who was previously The Times’ editor for strategy and innovation, will be executive vice president of product and technology.

    The New York Times announced in November Wilson would join the paper’s masthead. Before arriving at The Times, he was chief content officer at NPR, a post he left late last year.

    Wilson is a member of The Poynter Institute’s board of trustees and a former chairman of its national advisory board.

    Here’s the announcement:

    NEW YORK–(BUSINESS WIRE)– The New York Times Company announced today that Kinsey Wilson, currently The Times’s editor for strategy and innovation, has also been named executive vice president, product and technology. Mr. Wilson will join the company’s executive committee and expand his present role to assume leadership of all company-wide digital product and technology operations. He will report jointly to President and CEO Mark Thompson and Executive Editor Dean Baquet.

    In making the announcement, Mr. Thompson and Mr. Baquet said, “The company’s initial plan was to appoint an executive vice president who would work as a partner to Kinsey in his newsroom role. Since early February, though, as Kinsey has become a key contributor and grasped the challenges and opportunities of our digital transformation, we have become convinced that unifying these responsibilities under his leadership makes better sense and offers us an opportunity to accelerate the progress that is already underway. Kinsey is the ideal person for this role. He is a digital visionary with deep roots in journalism and he’s a dynamic leader with a keen understanding of digital products and technology.”

    Mr. Wilson said, “I’m thrilled to be taking on a broader role at The Times and grateful to Mark and Dean for their confidence in me. This is a very special place filled with immensely talented people. We all have a common goal, to make sure that people’s experience of The Times, wherever they find us, continues to match the brilliance of our journalism.”

    Mr. Wilson joined The Times in February 2015. Previously, he oversaw NPR’s global news-gathering, programming and digital operations as executive vice president and chief content officer. He drove the development of the NPR One mobile app, which pioneered a new personalized digital listening experience, championed initiatives such as Planet Money, NPR Music, and the Race Card Project and is widely credited with positioning NPR as a digital leader.

    Previously, Mr. Wilson was executive editor of USA Today, where he oversaw digital strategy and daily news operations. He also led Congressional Quarterly’s early web strategy and served as a reporter at Newsday for 7 years.

    David Perpich has been named senior vice president, product, reporting to Mr. Wilson. Since 2013, Mr. Perpich has been general manager of new digital products, leading the business side team charged with the creation of new digital products. He joined the company in 2010 as executive director of paid products and played a key part in the rollout of The Times’s digital subscription plan in 2011.

    Mr. Perpich came to The Times from the management consulting firm Booz & Company, where he was a member of their consumer, media and digital industries practice, focusing on growth strategy. He previously founded and ran two companies, both in the music industry, and he held roles in product management and business development at About.com, a former New York Times Company property. Mr. Perpich received a B.A. in economics from Duke University and an M.B.A. from Harvard University.

    The company also announced that Paul Smurl, who has been a central player in the growth of The Times’s digital business, is leaving to become COO and President of Some Spider LLC, a startup just launched by Diapers.com co-founder Vinit Bharara.

    Read more
Awards presented for best CNY journalism of 2012

The Syracuse Press Club honored the best journalism of 2012 at an awards ceremony Saturday night at Drumlins Country Club, in Syracuse.

The club's 35th annual Scholarship and Professional Recognition Awards dinner honored exceptional work in local print, broadcast and online.

 Among the highlights of the evening,  broadcasters WCNY-TV, YNN, CNYCentral and Newschannel 9 shared a first place award in the Special Television Program category for their jointly produced special Protecting Our Children. It was a project aimed at the problem of physical and sexual abuse of children.

Also among the highlights of the evening, Syracuse.com won for best news website,  The Post-Standard won for spot news coverage.  The Binghamton Press and Sun Bulletin was honored for best investigative reporting in a daily newspaper. Carol Thompson of the Valley News won investigative in a non-daily paper. WAER FM 88 won for best newscast on radio, and Newschannel 9 at 5 won best newscast in television.

The evening was hosted by Post-Standard/Syracuse.com sports columnist Bud Poliquin and Newschannel 9 reporter Tammy Palmer.

The Press Club also honored several individuals for their body of work.   CNYCentral multi media journalist Tom Eschen won the A. Brohmann Roth Newcomer award.   Recently retired WKTV anchorman Bill Worden was honored with the Gus Bliven-JoeGanley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award. 

The club also honored two former Post-Standard journalists with the Selwyn Kershaw Professional Standards Award.  John Berry spent his career at the paper as an award winning photographer.   Toni Guidice was honored for her nearly 30 year career and high standards as a  copy editor for the paper.

Three individuals shared the Philip Hofmann President's Award for Best News Source.  Ken Heffernan and Joe Galloway, investigators with the Syracuse Fire Department and Kae Young, public affairs officer with the 10th Mountain Division at Fort Drum were honored for their efforts to provide journalists with the information they need to report the news in a timely fashion.

The Syracuse Press Club is also proud to present a $2,000 scholarship to Paul Valentino, a student graduating from Onondaga Community college.

The Syracuse Press Club would like to sincerely thank the journalists and news managers of our local media for their hard work, dedication to their craft, and their support of the club by participating in our awards competition and attending this dinner.  Your support makes this event possible and makes possible the presentation of a scholarship to a journalism student.

Click here for a PDF file of the 2012 winners.

 

Last Updated ( Monday, 06 May 2013 00:55 )
 
"Everything is being compressed into tiny tablets. You take a little pill of news every day—23 minutes—and that’s supposed to be enough."
--Walter Cronkite

Wall of Distinction


Andy Brigham

WIXT

WTVH (WHEN-TV)

Club President: 1986

He was more than once likened to Mike Wallace of TV's "60 Minutes" and early in his career, the Syracuse New Times cited him as "the best investigative reporter in Syracuse."
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