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  • The politics of reforming digital audience metrics — don’t underestimate the status quo

    Long-time critics of imprecise unique visitor and page view metrics like me have had reason to cheer in recent months.

    Both the Financial Times and Economist have started to offer advertisers the alternative of rates based on time spent rather than raw traffic numbers.

    Chartbeat corrected a major flaw in existing measures of time spent, then got its system “accredited” by the influential Media Ratings Council. And Chartbeat CEO Tony Haile has been an effective evangelist in interviews and speeches for a more sophisticated way of looking at the attention of digital audiences.

    That’s real progress. But plowing through dozens of articles and interviewing a few key sources, I have concluded that it is way early to declare victory and a new day dawning in digital measurement.

    Oddly, although we like to think of the digital world as fast-moving and progressive, there is an established status quo for counting digital audiences backed by powerful vested interests who remain mostly happy with the unholy triad of uniques, page views and clickthroughs.

    Start with the digital big guys — Facebook, Google, Yahoo, AOL. They lead the pack in traffic volume as conventionally measured. With targeting capabilities, they suck up a huge share of digital ad spend — even more now with the shift to smartphones than they already did in the desktop/laptop era.

    Uniques and page views have also been good to the most popular start-up digital-only content providers — Huffington Post, BuzzFeed, Upworthy and more.

    A more surprising source of resistance is a large slice of the advertising industry, as spotlighted in Ad Age’s excellent takeout a month ago, “Is Digital Advertising Ready to Ditch the Click?” It summarized the resistance this way.

    “Agencies are among the entrenched interests,” said Benjamin Zeidler, director-research and analytics at digital-marketing agency Tenthwave. “They’re good at buying ads. They know how to do it. It’s probably scary to change the mode of how they do business — how they sell it, price and benchmark it.”

    Also, as you may have heard, these are boom times for “programmatic buying” — eliminating the middle men of sales people and media planners and instead relying on algorithms to locate and book available inventory at the lowest possible rate. Thoughtful consideration of a range of attention metrics would only get in the way of that process.

    Pay-per-click may be a relic of the early days of internet advertising. But the measure still makes sense for a certain kind of ad — trying to grab attention for the unfamiliar — like the pitches for Harry’s Razors or the Bellroy Skinny Wallet that stalk me as I move around the web.

    A middle-of-the-road constituency may buy in intellectually to a case for more varied metrics, but as a practical business matter needs to keep selling the way most advertisers are buying.

    That was the drift of a thoughtful rejoinder from News Corp.’s Raju Narisetti to an earlier screed of mine this spring denouncing uniques and page views. In his view, some of this kind of criticism comes from print traditionalists who would prefer not to give audience metrics a prominent role in news coverage decisions.

    Narisetti made the additional good point that metrics like page views per visit or repeat visits per month, “variations on relatively conventional” measures, are a reasonable way to identify attention.

    Trade groups like the Newspaper Association of America and the MPA magazine association also do versions of the straddle. Both have working groups exploring new metrics that may capture what they see as unique strengths of their digital offerings for advertisers. But neither is abandoning the standard measures just yet.

    NAA, for instance, puts out regular releases on industry gains in uniques and page views. That has always been a charm of the two measures — between the steady movement of audience to digital platforms and the easy tricks available to inflate the numbers, a growth story is all but sure to emerge.

    Another slightly different middle ground position fits auditing, rating and standards groups like the Alliance for Audited Media (formerly ABC), Nielsen and the Interactive Advertising Bureau. They naturally watch carefully for any new metric offerings in their core business. The IAB even has instigated important reform with work showing that the majority of “impressions” as measured a few years ago were not even seen (because they did not load fast enough or were too low on a screen page).

    But the heart of the auditors’ business interest is that if something new is going to be measured, they want the contract to be the recognized verifier of those numbers. For example, Nielsen, facing some new disruptive competitors like Rentrak, announced Tuesday a collaboration with Adobe on a new set of measures it is developing for digital viewing of television shows and other video.

    I also need to concede that the reformers have a self-serving agenda of their own. The Economist and Financial Times have strong paywalls, dedicated high-demographic readers but relatively modest total audience numbers. So it is to their advantage to shift the discussion with marketers to time spent engaged with their quality content and accompanying ad messages.

    Chartbeat and CEO Haile have made a great case for the flaws in traditional measures and the logic of shifting to time and attention (which are finite) from “impressions” which seem to multiply endlessly and are often fleeting at best.

    Chartbeat in its accredited “time spent” measure also did the good deed of correcting earlier stabs at such a metric — the loophole that counted a tab left open while the user shifted to something else conceivably for minutes or hours, as time on site. The Chartbeat refinement is that “time spent” is counted only if some indicator of viewer action registers every five seconds.

    Haile also announced this week that he will make the company’s methodology public, aiming for even further credibility, accepting some risk of giving away competitive secrets to a knock-off vendor.

    All that said, Chartbeat (and the similarly oriented Moat in the video sphere) are fighting the good fight for what they have to sell against established competitors who have built a good share of their business around uniques, page views and clicks.

    More sophisticated digital agencies like Razorfish are also in the camp advocating a combination of metrics and strategies they provide that are missing from more perfunctory ad placement methods.

    Where does this state of play leave legacy media or local digital startups in searching for a business model in the digital sun? Even the pioneers like the Financial Times are hedging their bets — their minutes viewed metric is being offered to a limited number of pilot advertisers in a beta test (going well according to Haile) while the majority of ads are still sold the old-fashioned way.

    I would look for companies like the New York Times, with good raw traffic numbers, to also explore alternative attention metrics. And the trade associations are likely to at least give a nudge to consideration of a suite of metrics in measuring audience and pricing ads rather than just the conventional big three.

    Jerry Hill, Gannett’s top audience executive and chairman of the newly formed NAA task force, told me the group is starting by surveying advertisers and agencies about “what they look at” now in evaluating effectiveness. The next step, he said would be to identify new measures that could be validated and “communicated out in simple terms.”

    The MPA has launched what it calls the “360-degree brand audience report,” a monthly update by participating magazine sites that measures audience on multiple dimensions in a standardized format, including, for instance, referrals from five social media channels.

    Mark Contreras, then of E.W. Scripps, led a crusade for better digital audience metrics during his term as NAA chairman in 2009. He hoped to establish a better “gold standard,” perhaps with a nudge from government, as happened with a move from chaotic claims from competing vendors measuring television audience in the 1950s and early 1960s to the agreed-upon methodology Nielsen and others now follow.

    A gold standard does not appear in the cards right now, but movement to a more  varied and logical set of metrics has at least started. Contreras, now CEO of a small private TV and newspaper company, Calkins Media, told me in a phone interview that the logic remains unchanged: “For local papers, relying on a CPM (cost per thousand impressions) economy is not going to grow digital ad revenue as we need to.”

    One alternative, Contreras added, is to “find niches and sell sponsorships” on roughly the same principle as “soap operas did in the 1950s,” aimed at stay-at-home housewives. Targeting is more important than a raw audience count for a sports site or a food site, and smartphone apps or specialized sites lend themselves to the “brought to you by…” format.

    A number of the articles on this fall’s metrics developments stumbled upon the same summary phrase — “a step in the right direction.” That seems about right. The current system is unlikely to be turned on its head anytime soon.  But content providers who think they can offer sustained attention are beginning to get some tools to make the case to advertisers that they offer a superior value.

    Read more
  • Career Beat: Rachel Zarrell named news editor at BuzzFeed News

    Good morning! Here are some career updates from the journalism community:

    • Rachel Zarrell is now news editor at BuzzFeed News. Previously, she was a weekend editor there. (‏@rachelzarrell)
    • Ben Calhoun is now director of content and programming at WBEZ in Chicago. Previously, he was a producer for “This American Life.” (Robert Feder)
    • Ada Guerin is now creative director at The Wrap. Previously, she was design director and associate art director at The Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap)
    • Jose Zamora is now on the board of directors of the Online News Association. He is director of strategic communications at Univision Network. (ONA)
    • Carla Zanoni will be global audience development director at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was director of social media and engagement at DNAinfo.com. (Carla Zanoni)
    • Tara Adiseshan is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post. Previously, she worked on search design at Autodesk and conducted research focused on harvesting rainwater in India. Juan Elosua is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at La Nacion. He is a telecommunications engineer and data journalist. Livia Labate is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at NPR. Previously, she led Marriott’s digital standards and practices group. Linda Sandvik is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The Guardian. Previously, she worked in local government. Julia Smith is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at the Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, she was a designer and developer on news sites and mobile applications. Francis Tseng is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post He currently teaches at the New School’s Design + Journalism program. (dansinker.com)
    • Jon Garinn is now medical editor of the Radiology Administration department at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Previously, he was managing editor of CURE Magazine. (email)

    Job of the day: Politico is looking for a lobbying reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs)

    Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

    Read more
  • Could Sun-Times reporter’s resignation affect governor’s race?

    mediawiremorningGood morning. Here are 10 media stories.

    1. Will Sun-Times reporter’s resignation shake Illinois governor’s race? Sun-Times Springfield bureau chief Dave McKinney quit publicly yesterday, saying the paper suspended him after Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner — a former investor in the Sun-Times’ parent company — tried to get a story squashed because he’s married to a Democratic consultant. (Dave McKinney’s blog) | Sun-Times EIC Jim Kirk responds: “I call the shots. While I’ve been here, our ownership and management have never quashed a story and they have always respected the journalistic integrity of this paper.” (Poynter) | To make this story even more gothic, the Sun-Times endorsed Rauner last Friday, breaking a policy it set in early 2012. | “But, at a minimum, the ongoing story certainly will give the [campaign of Rauner's Democratic opponent, Gov. Pat Quinn] an enormous platform to charge that Mr. Rauner is against not just poor people but freedom of the press,” Greg Hinz writes. (Crain’s Chicago Business)
    2. OK, it’s time to pay attention to Gamergate: The online movement, which opposes…something “has declared another victory after software maker Adobe implicitly condemned a recent series of tweets from Gawker writer Sam Biddle that made fun of the Gamergate movement.” (Re/code) | Gawker Editor-in-Chief Max Read writes: “I’ve been told that we’ve lost thousands of dollars already, and could potentially lose thousands more, if not millions.” Read says he feels like “went to sleep in the regular world and woke up in an insane new one where ‘bullying’ is something that it’s possible to be seriously and sincerely ‘for.’” Nevertheless, brands like Intel and Adobe have proven themselves “willing to distance themselves from independent publishers over the spurious claims of a limited but dedicated group of misogynists and trolls.” (Gawker) | “Adobe walks into Gamergate, staggers around confusedly” (Boing Boing)
    3. A little bit more on Ben Bradlee: He struggled with issues of race and sex in the newsroom. (Maynard Institute) | Rachel Jones remembers how Bradlee pushed her to take a Washington Post internship and basically willed her into employment as a journalist. “We have GOT to make an effort to include voices besides our own in this goddamned newspaper,” she remembers him saying. (LinkedIn) | “If there was one happy facet of the [Janet] Cooke affair, it was that the mistake of one young reporter cleared the way for the success of another,” Jon Campbell writes: The Village Voice got its first Pulitzer after the Post returned Cooke’s prize, for Teresa Carpenter‘s story about Dorothy Stratten, “Death of a Playmate.” (The Village Voice) | Bradlee’s tenure at the Post should be viewed in relation to his slimly acknowledged competition with Jim Bellows at the Washington Star. “Bellows might have gotten a bigger send off when he died at the age of 86 in 2009 had Bradlee had preceded him in death,” Jack Shafer writes. “But, no, Bradlee was the last giant standing, and according to the rules of the game, he who dies last gets the biggest funeral pyre. Bellows would understand completely.” (Reuters) | Media myths creep into Bradlee obits. (Media Myth Alert)
    4. Anderson Cooper swats reporter who asked for selfie with him: Vandon Gene requested a photo with the CNN anchor at the site where a Canadian soldier was killed yesterday. (The Blaze) | “I can’t believe any station employs you, and if you want to be a journalist, learn how to behave when covering a story.” (@andersoncooper)
    5. NYT may have lots of takers for buyouts: Guild rep Grant Glickson tells Keith J. Kelly “There were over 300 requests,” by members to look at the company’s severance packages. (NYP) | The company is looking to shed 100 jobs. (Poynter) | “‘Some people who were undecided about leaving, or just curious, didn’t want to request the paperwork because they worried (correctly or not) that it would put targets on their backs,’ Times higher education reporter Richard Pérez-Peña, a Guild vice chair, wrote Thursday in a post on Facebook. ‘To protect those people, some of my colleagues suggested that EVERYONE should ask for it. Suddenly, the number soared, but most of those people have no intention of leaving.’” (Capital)
    6. Why did Politico Magazine let a BP PR exec write a story about pollution in the Gulf? Geoff Morrell‘s story, “No, BP Didn’t Ruin the Gulf,” is “Free native advertising,” Erik Wemple writes. (WP) | “As of Wednesday afternoon, Morrell’s piece is now filed to the ‘Opinion’ section of Politico Magazine. The story was earlier filed to ‘Environment’ and not clearly marked as an Opinion piece.” (Newsweek)
    7. Roman Mars’ advice for indie radio producers: “The most fundamental thing is own your work.” (Capital)
    8. A road trip in North Korea: Eric Talmadge took a monitored trip through the Hermit Kingdom: “At the best hotels in cities such as Hamhung, Samjiyon and Chongjin, the places where we stayed as our journey proceeded through the hinterlands, the rooms, replete with doilies and cushy velvet-covered chairs, were clean, the decor retro Soviet and the food plentiful. But the vintage TVs, when they worked, offered only one channel.” (AP)
    9. Front page of the day, curated by Kristen Hare: “Attacked,” on the front of the Globe and Mail. (More Canadian front pages here.)

      globeandmail-10232014  

    10. Job moves, edited by Benjamin Mullin: Rachel Zarrell is now news editor at BuzzFeed News. Previously, she was a weekend editor there. (‏@rachelzarrell) | Ben Calhoun is now director of content and programming at WBEZ in Chicago. Previously, he was a producer for “This American Life.” (Robert Feder) | Ada Guerin is now creative director at The Wrap. Previously, she was design director and associate art director at The Hollywood Reporter. (The Wrap) | Jose Zamora is now on the board of directors of the Online News Association. He is director of strategic communications at Univision Network. (ONA) | Carla Zanoni will be global audience development director at The Wall Street Journal. Previously, she was director of social media and engagement at DNAinfo.com. (Carla Zanoni) | Tara Adiseshan is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post. Previously, she worked on search design at Autodesk and conducted research focused on harvesting rainwater in India. Juan Elosua is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at La Nacion. He is a telecommunications engineer and data journalist. Livia Labate is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at NPR. Previously, she led Marriott’s digital standards and practices group. Linda Sandvik is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The Guardian. Previously, she worked in local government. Julia Smith is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at the Center for Investigative Reporting. Previously, she was a designer and developer on news sites and mobile applications. Francis Tseng is now a Knight-Mozilla fellow at The New York Times and The Washington Post He currently teaches at the New School’s Design + Journalism program. (dansinker.com) | Jon Garinn is now medical editor of the radiology administration department at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Previously, he was managing editor of CURE Magazine. (email) | Job of the day: Politico is looking for a lobbying reporter. Get your résumés in! (Journalism Jobs) | Send Ben your job moves: bmullin@poynter.org

    Suggestions? Criticisms? Would like me to send you this roundup each morning? Please email me: abeaujon@poynter.org.

    Read more
Media giant ESPN target of lawsuit by Laurie Fine
Wednesday, 16 May 2012 13:22


Laurie Fine will file a lawsuit n federal court accusing ESPN and two of its employees of libel.  Fine's suit accuses the network of breaking the story of Bobby Davis'  allegations of sexual abuse against her husband, former assistant basketball coach of Bernie Fine without any credible corroborating sources. "This Complaint for Libel arises from Defendant ESPN’s coverage of Robert Davis’ uncorroborated attack upon Plaintiff Laurie J. Fine. Through this coverage, ESPN, acting by and through its agents and employees, including Defendants Mark Schwarz and Arthur Berko, spitefully destroyed Laurie Fine’s reputation in an attempt to capitalize financially in the tragic wake of the Penn State Sex Abuse Scandal. Defendants have ruined Laurie Fine’s reputation by maliciously publishing false and defamatory factual accusations."

In the lawsuit document Fine flatly denies ever knowing of or suspecting her husband of molesting Davis or any other person.  She also denies Davis' claim that she had a sexual relationship with him or Davis claim that she had sexual relationships with several former Syracuse University basketball players.

Local media promise extended coverage with local television outlets planning to carry the news conference live on their secondary digital channels and on their websites, and feeding national media with the story.  ESPN responded claiming the  suit is without merit an the network  stand behind its story.

Here are links to some local media coverage:

syracuse.com
YNN
Newschannel 9
CNYcentral

 

 

Last Updated ( Wednesday, 16 May 2012 23:08 )
 
"Our liberty depends on the freedom of the press, and that cannot be limited without being lost."
--Thomas Jefferson

Wall of Distinction


E.R. Vadeboncoeur

WSYR Radio and TV

Syracuse Journal

Mention the name E.R. Vadeboncoeur and it's his radio news broadcasts and Election Night commentaries that come to mind for many longtime Central New Yorkers. Long forgotten is that "Curly," as he was known to his friends, started out to be a newspaperman.

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