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Poynter.
  • After new plagiarism allegations, Time magazine will review Zakaria’s work again

    Our Bad Media

    Time magazine will review Fareed Zakaria’s work after Twitter users @blippoblappo and @crushingbort accused the CNN journalist of lifting from a variety of publications, including Vanity Fair, Businessweek and the New Yorker.

    Time magazine “takes the accusations seriously,” according to a statement from Daniel Kile, vice president of communications for Time Inc.:

    In 2012, we conducted a review of Zakaria’s work for TIME and were satisfied with the results of that investigation. We will be reviewing these new allegations carefully.

    Zakaria is the host of “Fareed Zakaria GPS,” a columnist for the Washington Post and was recently named a contributor to Atlantic Media. He was previously an editor-at-large for Time magazine.

    Fred Hiatt, the editorial page editor of The Washington Post, called the new accusations “reckless” in a statement to Poynter:

    “If I’m not mistaken, the newest allegations feature only one WP column, and when I looked at that I thought it was so far from a case of plagiarism that it made me question the entire enterprise.

    Read more
  • NYT corrects: Bald eagles’ poop isn’t purple

    A New York Times correction delves into the nitty gritty of bald eagle and osprey poop:

    An earlier version of this article described bald eagles and ospreys incorrectly. They eat fish, and their poop is white; they do not eat berries and excrete purple feces. (Other birds, like American robins, Eurasian starlings and cedar waxwings, do.)

    Read more
  • Digital First puts 51 newspaper buildings on the market

    Digital First Media has listed 51 newspaper buildings for sale, according to a press release from the real estate firm Twenty Lake Holdings.

    The properties are “for sale across seven states including California, Connecticut, Colorado and Pennsylvania, to name a few,” Twenty Lake Holdings says in its release.

    The planned sale “enables us to streamline our real estate portfolio through a comprehensive program encompassing property sales, new leasing, relocations and consolidation, thereby freeing the company from the constraints of being overburdened with underutilized properties,” DFM President and COO Steve Rossi says in the release.

    With the addition of the DFM properties, Twenty Lakes and the broker Praxis Commercial have 70 newspaper buildings for sale in total, the release says.

    Reached by email, DFM CEO John Paton said the listings represent “the remainder of our real estate holdings not yet sold.… Read more

Michael J. Connor, recipient of the Bliven-Ganley-Rossi Career Achievement award

Editors note: We are posting articles about the special club award winners honored May 5 at the annual SPC Awards dinner.

By Mike McAndrew

Michael J. Connor speaks with a fiery passion about the importance of watchdog journalism and the public’s thirst for local news.

But economic realities pinching all of Syracuse’s media organizations means there’s fewer boots on the ground and the city’s news is being covered less thoroughly now than 10 or 20 years ago, The Post-Standard’s executive editor said.

  “I can remember a time when all or most of the three network affiliates in broadcast TV had court reporters and municipal reporters. There was pretty fierce competition in government and institutional coverage. That’s gone away. Radio reporting is almost nonexistent,” he said. “There’s less competition. There’s just fewer reporters (in Syracuse) than there were at one time. That can’t help but reduce the amount of basic reporting and contextual reporting made available to residents of the area.”

 “If fewer institutions are being covered on a regular basis because you have a smaller total reporting staff in the community, at some point readers are missing something,” he said.
 Connor — who is being awarded the Gus Bliven-Joe Ganley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award by the Syracuse Press Club — has spent his entire 36-year journalism career at The Post-Standard.
 While a student at Cornell University, he decided to pursue a newspaper career after being inspired by a speech by investigative reporter Seymour Hersh.

 Connor started out in 1976 as a bureau reporter based in Oneida. After working in a series of reporting and editing positions, he became the paper’s managing editor in 1983.
 Under Connor’s leadership, The Post-Standard in 1993 was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory journalism for a series of stories about poor medical care provided to inmates in state prisons. The prison series remains among Connor’s favorite stories published by the newspaper.

 That same year, Connor was named executive editor of The Post-Standard. When the morning paper merged in 1997 with The Herald-Journal, Connor became executive editor of the combined news operation.
 These days, the 59-year editor is overseeing the transformation of The Post-Standard from a newspaper into a news organization that delivers stories, photos, video and audio recordings to readers via the newspaper, syracuse.com, Twitter, Facebook and other social media outlets.

 “The Post-Standard is the best-read newspaper in America. Syracuse.com is one of the strongest newspaper websites in America. Why? Because of Mike Connor,” said Stephen A. Rogers, editor and publisher of The Post-Standard. “He built a great staff and pushed it to the top.”

 Connor has two sons, Jeff, 25, who is a musician, and Adam, 21, who graduates this month from the University of Vermont.

 Outside of the job, Connor spends his time biking 10 to 15 miles per day before work. On weekends, he sometimes takes 40-mile rides around Skaneateles Lake.

 He also volunteers Thursday nights at Matthew House, serving terminally-ill people at a hospice residence in Auburn.

 “It’s an extraordinary place of great peace, for families and individuals preparing for that transition, that next phase. It’s about as caring and loving a place as you can imagine,” he said.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 13 May 2012 02:03 )
 
"Everything is being compressed into tiny tablets. You take a little pill of news every day—23 minutes—and that’s supposed to be enough."
--Walter Cronkite

Wall of Distinction


Joel Mareiniss

WSYR-TV (WSTM)

WSYR

WHEN

For more than four decades, an instantly recognizable face, a captivating smile, and a voice that was once synonymous with Syracuse University football and basketball, Joel Mareiniss earned the distinction of being a Central New York broadcast legend.
Read more...Link

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