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Poynter.
  • White House correspondents unveil proposals to loosen presidential press control

    The White House Correspondents’ Association unveiled a set of “principles and practices” Saturday in search of “meaningful and consistent access to the President and his or her aides whenever and wherever they conduct the public’s business.”

    The principles and a set of proposed practices reflect a growing frustration with the administration of President Barack Obama and a sense by those who cover the White House daily that they are increasingly kept in the dark.

    That frustration is part and parcel of clear trends of successive administrations. Inevitably they believe they can manage their “message” and images of a president more effectively by avoiding traditional media, keeping even the frequently pedestrian under wraps and circumventing the mainstream press through their own use of social media or many new outlets. Read more

  • Flags, fireworks, freedom of the press and an eagle: Here are 5 Fourth of July fronts

    Sunday fronts will likely be bursting with images of fireworks from around the country, but newspapers are celebrating the Fourth of July today, too. Here’s a quick collection of fronts, via Newseum, that shows how:

    The Clarion-Ledger in Jackson, Mississippi led the holiday calling out the politicians who haven’t yet responded to a poll about removing the Confederate flag from that state’s flag.

    MS_CL

    In St. Louis, Missouri, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch captured a sky full of fireworks with a statue of King Louis IX looking on.

    MO_SLPD

    The Oklahoman, from Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, has what looks to me like the fourthiest Fourth of July front today.

    OK_DOK

    Home News Tribune in East Brunswick, New Jersey, led the front with an editorial about why freedom of the press matters. Read more

  • Gawker Media alleges ‘serious irregularity’ in Hulk Hogan sex-tape evidence
    Hogan. (AP)

    Hogan. (AP)

    Last week, Gawker Media prevailed in a legal battle it had been waging with the FBI for more than a year.

    A judge ruled that the bureau and another law enforcement agency had to turn over evidence related to an investigation into a sex tape that figures prominently into Gawker’s pending high-stakes lawsuit.

    But during a hearing today, lawyers from Gawker Media expressed concerns about the evidence.

    Representatives from Gawker Media, the FBI and the Executive Office of United States Attorneys appeared before a judge at a United States District Court in Tampa, Florida. The purpose of the hearing was to sort out which documents requested by Gawker under the Freedom of Information Act the law enforcement organizations were legally obligated to turn over. Read more

Michael J. Connor, recipient of the Bliven-Ganley-Rossi Career Achievement award

Editors note: We are posting articles about the special club award winners honored May 5 at the annual SPC Awards dinner.

By Mike McAndrew

Michael J. Connor speaks with a fiery passion about the importance of watchdog journalism and the public’s thirst for local news.

But economic realities pinching all of Syracuse’s media organizations means there’s fewer boots on the ground and the city’s news is being covered less thoroughly now than 10 or 20 years ago, The Post-Standard’s executive editor said.

  “I can remember a time when all or most of the three network affiliates in broadcast TV had court reporters and municipal reporters. There was pretty fierce competition in government and institutional coverage. That’s gone away. Radio reporting is almost nonexistent,” he said. “There’s less competition. There’s just fewer reporters (in Syracuse) than there were at one time. That can’t help but reduce the amount of basic reporting and contextual reporting made available to residents of the area.”

 “If fewer institutions are being covered on a regular basis because you have a smaller total reporting staff in the community, at some point readers are missing something,” he said.
 Connor — who is being awarded the Gus Bliven-Joe Ganley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award by the Syracuse Press Club — has spent his entire 36-year journalism career at The Post-Standard.
 While a student at Cornell University, he decided to pursue a newspaper career after being inspired by a speech by investigative reporter Seymour Hersh.

 Connor started out in 1976 as a bureau reporter based in Oneida. After working in a series of reporting and editing positions, he became the paper’s managing editor in 1983.
 Under Connor’s leadership, The Post-Standard in 1993 was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory journalism for a series of stories about poor medical care provided to inmates in state prisons. The prison series remains among Connor’s favorite stories published by the newspaper.

 That same year, Connor was named executive editor of The Post-Standard. When the morning paper merged in 1997 with The Herald-Journal, Connor became executive editor of the combined news operation.
 These days, the 59-year editor is overseeing the transformation of The Post-Standard from a newspaper into a news organization that delivers stories, photos, video and audio recordings to readers via the newspaper, syracuse.com, Twitter, Facebook and other social media outlets.

 “The Post-Standard is the best-read newspaper in America. Syracuse.com is one of the strongest newspaper websites in America. Why? Because of Mike Connor,” said Stephen A. Rogers, editor and publisher of The Post-Standard. “He built a great staff and pushed it to the top.”

 Connor has two sons, Jeff, 25, who is a musician, and Adam, 21, who graduates this month from the University of Vermont.

 Outside of the job, Connor spends his time biking 10 to 15 miles per day before work. On weekends, he sometimes takes 40-mile rides around Skaneateles Lake.

 He also volunteers Thursday nights at Matthew House, serving terminally-ill people at a hospice residence in Auburn.

 “It’s an extraordinary place of great peace, for families and individuals preparing for that transition, that next phase. It’s about as caring and loving a place as you can imagine,” he said.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 13 May 2012 02:03 )
 
"If none of us ever read a book that was “dangerous,” had a friend who was “different” or joined an organization that advocated “change,” we would all be just the kind of people Joe McCarthy wants. Whose fault is that? Not really [McCarthy’s]. He didn’t create this situation of fear. He merely exploited it, and rather successfully."
--Edward R. Murrow

Wall of Distinction


Joel Mareiniss

WSYR-TV (WSTM)

WSYR

WHEN

For more than four decades, an instantly recognizable face, a captivating smile, and a voice that was once synonymous with Syracuse University football and basketball, Joel Mareiniss earned the distinction of being a Central New York broadcast legend.
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