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Poynter.
  • At Nashville Public Radio, Emily Siner’s bringing together the movers, the thinkers and the community

    In April, about 50 people gathered at Nashville Public Radio to hear enterprise reporter Emily Siner interview a pastry chef, a letterpress poster maker and a cyber security expert.

    The idea, as Emily puts it, was to find people who work behind the scenes in fascinating places and ask them more about their jobs.

    I love that Emily pitched the idea for a bimonthly event series to her bosses and that they championed the idea. But what I love even more was that Emily then turned the live event into both a podcast and a newsletter — ensuring that a feedback loop was then created between the station and their audience in person, then on digital, and then through email.

    Emily Siner, screen shot

    Emily Siner, screen shot

    The podcast, called Movers and Thinkers, is described as “one part TED Radio Hour and one part Fresh Air — mixed with a Nashville flavor.” I asked Emily to talk a little bit more about the podcast and what other local journalism organizations could do to ensure that their live events live beyond the event itself. Read more

  • Washington Post calls Tuesday closed trial of Jason Rezaian ‘shameful’

    The Washington Post said it was “shameful” that the trial of its Tehran-based correspondent Jason Rezaian would be closed even to members of his family.

    “The shameful acts of injustice continue without end in the treatment of Washington Post correspondent Jason Rezaian,” said Post Executive Editor Martin Baron in a statement about a trial set to begin Tuesday.

    “Now we learn his trial will be closed to the world. And so it will be closed to the scrutiny it fully deserves”

    Baron also noted that his reporter was placed in isolation, denied medical care for months, saw his case “assigned to a judge internationally notorious for human rights violations” and was given just 90 minutes for one meeting with a court-approved attorney.

    In addition, even on the eve of trial, no formal set of charges and evidence had been presented to him. Read more

  • Memorial Day front pages are ‘In their honor’

    Here’s a collection of front pages via Newseum from around the U.S. honoring veterans on Memorial Day Weekend. As you’ll see, some focus on veterans today, some on the those from past wars and some on the impact those veterans have had on the community.

    From Sunday:

    The Anniston Star, Anniston, Alabama:

    AL_AS
     
     
    Inland Valley Daily Bulletin, Ontario, California:

    CA_IVDB
     
     
    The Southern Illinoisan, Carbondale, Illinois:

    IL_SI
     
     
    Palladium-Item, Richmond, Indiana:

    IN_PI
     
     
    The Town Talk, Alexandria, Louisiana:

    LA_TTT
     
     
    The Sun Chronicle, Attleboro, Massachusetts:

    MA_SC
     
     
    The Statesman Journal, Salem, Oregon:

    OR_SJ
     
     
    The Leaf-Chronicle, Clarksville, Tennessee:

    TN_LC

    From Monday:

    Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama:

    AL_MA
     
     
    The Orange County Register, Santa Ana, California:

    CA_OCR
     
     

    Fort Collins Coloradoan, Fort Collins, Colorado:

    CO_FCC
     
     
    Honolulu Star Advertiser, Honolulu, Hawaii:

    HI_SA
     
     
    Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois:

    IL_CT
     
     
    The Hawk Eye, Burlington, Iowa:

    IA_HE
     
     
    The Hutchinson News, Hutchinson, Kansas:

    KS_HN
     
     
    The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky:

    KY_CJ
     
     
    Boston Herald, Boston, Massachusetts:

    MA_BH
     
     
    Omaha World-Herald, Omaha, Nebraska:

    NE_OWH
     
     
    Newsday, Long Island, New York:

    NY_ND
     
     
    The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee:

    TN_TT
     
     
    The Virginian-Pilot:

    VA_VP
     
     
    The Spokesman-Review, Spokane, Washington:

    WA_SR
     
     
    Follow @kristenhare
    !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');

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Michael J. Connor, recipient of the Bliven-Ganley-Rossi Career Achievement award

Editors note: We are posting articles about the special club award winners honored May 5 at the annual SPC Awards dinner.

By Mike McAndrew

Michael J. Connor speaks with a fiery passion about the importance of watchdog journalism and the public’s thirst for local news.

But economic realities pinching all of Syracuse’s media organizations means there’s fewer boots on the ground and the city’s news is being covered less thoroughly now than 10 or 20 years ago, The Post-Standard’s executive editor said.

  “I can remember a time when all or most of the three network affiliates in broadcast TV had court reporters and municipal reporters. There was pretty fierce competition in government and institutional coverage. That’s gone away. Radio reporting is almost nonexistent,” he said. “There’s less competition. There’s just fewer reporters (in Syracuse) than there were at one time. That can’t help but reduce the amount of basic reporting and contextual reporting made available to residents of the area.”

 “If fewer institutions are being covered on a regular basis because you have a smaller total reporting staff in the community, at some point readers are missing something,” he said.
 Connor — who is being awarded the Gus Bliven-Joe Ganley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award by the Syracuse Press Club — has spent his entire 36-year journalism career at The Post-Standard.
 While a student at Cornell University, he decided to pursue a newspaper career after being inspired by a speech by investigative reporter Seymour Hersh.

 Connor started out in 1976 as a bureau reporter based in Oneida. After working in a series of reporting and editing positions, he became the paper’s managing editor in 1983.
 Under Connor’s leadership, The Post-Standard in 1993 was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory journalism for a series of stories about poor medical care provided to inmates in state prisons. The prison series remains among Connor’s favorite stories published by the newspaper.

 That same year, Connor was named executive editor of The Post-Standard. When the morning paper merged in 1997 with The Herald-Journal, Connor became executive editor of the combined news operation.
 These days, the 59-year editor is overseeing the transformation of The Post-Standard from a newspaper into a news organization that delivers stories, photos, video and audio recordings to readers via the newspaper, syracuse.com, Twitter, Facebook and other social media outlets.

 “The Post-Standard is the best-read newspaper in America. Syracuse.com is one of the strongest newspaper websites in America. Why? Because of Mike Connor,” said Stephen A. Rogers, editor and publisher of The Post-Standard. “He built a great staff and pushed it to the top.”

 Connor has two sons, Jeff, 25, who is a musician, and Adam, 21, who graduates this month from the University of Vermont.

 Outside of the job, Connor spends his time biking 10 to 15 miles per day before work. On weekends, he sometimes takes 40-mile rides around Skaneateles Lake.

 He also volunteers Thursday nights at Matthew House, serving terminally-ill people at a hospice residence in Auburn.

 “It’s an extraordinary place of great peace, for families and individuals preparing for that transition, that next phase. It’s about as caring and loving a place as you can imagine,” he said.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 13 May 2012 02:03 )
 
"News is the first rough draft of history."
--Philip L. Graham (1915–1963), U.S. newspaper publisher

Wall of Distinction

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Atkinson

Executive Editor, The Post-Standard

Atkinson was a reporter and editor with The Post-Standard since starting in 1954 as its Saranac Lake correspondent. Eleven short years later, in 1965, he’d worked his way through its ranks to become managing editor, directing the paper’s entire news operation.

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