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Poynter.
  • BuzzFeed changes posts that swiped text

    Gawker | Our Bad Media

    BuzzFeed has updated and attached corrections to three articles by Benny Johnson that swiped passages from other sources, J.K. Trotter reports in Gawker. The notes (1, 2, 3) were added Thursday afternoon.

    Two Twitter users with the names @blippoblappo and @crushingbort outlined examples of Johnson lifting text, in one case from a press release from U.S. Rep. Sam Johnson.

    BuzzFeed Editor-in-Chief Ben Smith told Trotter BuzzFeed was “grateful to @blippoblappo and @crushingbort” for alerting it to the lifted text and said Johnson, the publication’s viral politics editor, “is one of the web’s deeply original writers, as is clear from his body of work.”

    Smith told Poynter that BuzzFeed plans to keep Johnson on.… Read more

  • Economist updates article after man’s mother objects to his photo

    The Economist published a blog post that tried to show negative stereotypes of tourists from different countries are often untrue and unfair.

    And by stereotypes, they mean:

    Germans? Humourless and demanding. Americans? Loud with garish shorts. Chinese? Rude. Canadians? Actually Canadians are all quite nice. And the Brits? Drunken, violent louts

    The original version of the article featured a picture of a young British fellow “on a night out in Mallorca.” This upset the man’s mother, and she contacted the publication to ask that it not tar him with the aforementioned “drunken, violent” brush.

    Well, The Economist was only happy to comply. It changed the photo and added this note to the bottom of the story:

    Note: This blogpost was originally illustrated with a photograph of a young British man on a night out in Mallorca.

    Read more
  • Washington Post reporter among 4 journalists detained in Iran

    Washington Post

    The Washington Post’s Ernesto Londoño reported Thursday that correspondent Jason Rezaian was detained in Iran on Tuesday along with his wife and two other Americans.

    “We are deeply troubled by this news and are concerned for the welfare of Jason, Yeganeh and two others said to have been detained with them,” (foreign editor Douglas) Jehl said in a statement.

    Rezaian is the Tehran correspondent for the paper. He hasn’t tweeted since July 21. Londoño reported that Rezaian’s wife is also a journalist. She hasn’t tweeted since July 20.

    Rezaian, 38, holds American and Iranian citizenship. Yeganeh, an Iranian citizen who has applied for U.S. permanent residency, works as a correspondent for the National, a newspaper based in the United Arab Emirates.

    The other two American citizens detained with them work as freelance photojournalists.

    Read more
Michael J. Connor, recipient of the Bliven-Ganley-Rossi Career Achievement award

Editors note: We are posting articles about the special club award winners honored May 5 at the annual SPC Awards dinner.

By Mike McAndrew

Michael J. Connor speaks with a fiery passion about the importance of watchdog journalism and the public’s thirst for local news.

But economic realities pinching all of Syracuse’s media organizations means there’s fewer boots on the ground and the city’s news is being covered less thoroughly now than 10 or 20 years ago, The Post-Standard’s executive editor said.

  “I can remember a time when all or most of the three network affiliates in broadcast TV had court reporters and municipal reporters. There was pretty fierce competition in government and institutional coverage. That’s gone away. Radio reporting is almost nonexistent,” he said. “There’s less competition. There’s just fewer reporters (in Syracuse) than there were at one time. That can’t help but reduce the amount of basic reporting and contextual reporting made available to residents of the area.”

 “If fewer institutions are being covered on a regular basis because you have a smaller total reporting staff in the community, at some point readers are missing something,” he said.
 Connor — who is being awarded the Gus Bliven-Joe Ganley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award by the Syracuse Press Club — has spent his entire 36-year journalism career at The Post-Standard.
 While a student at Cornell University, he decided to pursue a newspaper career after being inspired by a speech by investigative reporter Seymour Hersh.

 Connor started out in 1976 as a bureau reporter based in Oneida. After working in a series of reporting and editing positions, he became the paper’s managing editor in 1983.
 Under Connor’s leadership, The Post-Standard in 1993 was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory journalism for a series of stories about poor medical care provided to inmates in state prisons. The prison series remains among Connor’s favorite stories published by the newspaper.

 That same year, Connor was named executive editor of The Post-Standard. When the morning paper merged in 1997 with The Herald-Journal, Connor became executive editor of the combined news operation.
 These days, the 59-year editor is overseeing the transformation of The Post-Standard from a newspaper into a news organization that delivers stories, photos, video and audio recordings to readers via the newspaper, syracuse.com, Twitter, Facebook and other social media outlets.

 “The Post-Standard is the best-read newspaper in America. Syracuse.com is one of the strongest newspaper websites in America. Why? Because of Mike Connor,” said Stephen A. Rogers, editor and publisher of The Post-Standard. “He built a great staff and pushed it to the top.”

 Connor has two sons, Jeff, 25, who is a musician, and Adam, 21, who graduates this month from the University of Vermont.

 Outside of the job, Connor spends his time biking 10 to 15 miles per day before work. On weekends, he sometimes takes 40-mile rides around Skaneateles Lake.

 He also volunteers Thursday nights at Matthew House, serving terminally-ill people at a hospice residence in Auburn.

 “It’s an extraordinary place of great peace, for families and individuals preparing for that transition, that next phase. It’s about as caring and loving a place as you can imagine,” he said.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 13 May 2012 02:03 )
 
    "Their constant yelping about a free press means, with a few honorable exceptions, freedom to peddle scandal, crime, sex, sensationalism, hate, innuendo and the political and financial uses of propaganda. A newspaper is a business out to make money through advertising revenue. That is predicated on the circulation and you know what circulation depends on."
--Raymond Chandler

Wall of Distinction


Richard Long

Herald-Journal

Herald American

Skaneateles Press

Richard Long's career has spanned the world and embraced such endeavors as reporter, columnist, author, playwright, documentary filmmaker, director and producer.
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