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  • Caroline Little is stepping down as CEO and President of Newspaper Association of America

    littleCaroline LIttle will be leaving her job as president and CEO of the Newspaper Association of America at the end of August, NAA announced this afternoon.

    She will have been head of the industry trade association for just over four years when she departs.

    Little is a lawyer and served as publisher/CEO of Washington Post/Newsweek Interactive and then as CEO of the Guardian’s North America operations before joining NAA in 2011. Her background as a digital executive figured in her being hired to succeed John Sturm who served 16 years and was a lawyer and experienced lobbyist.

    I reached Little by phone, and asked what she expects to do next. “I don’t really have any future plans right now,” she replied, except moving to Sante Fe, “where I have a husband, a child and a dog — in that order.”

    As industry’s revenues have fallen, NAA has sharply downsized.   Read more

  • The New York Times linked John Bolton’s op-ed to a story making the opposite case

    The Intercept

    Yesterday, former United Nations ambassador John Bolton published an op-ed in the pages of The New York Times, arguing that the United States has no choice but to bomb Iran. “Only military action like Israel’s 1981 attack on Saddam Hussein’s Osirak reactor … can accomplish what is required,” Bolton wrote.

    But The Intercept’s Jon Schwarz noticed something odd about that sentence in the paper’s online edition. The reference to Israel’s attack on the Osirak reactor contained a link to a Washington Post op-ed that argued that far from crippling Iraq’s nuclear weapons program, Israel’s attack actually compelled Saddam Hussein to employ 7,000 scientists and spend $10 billion in pursuit of a nuclear bomb.

    This is not exactly the sort of supporting link that Bolton might have hoped for. Read more

  • ACES: AP’s guidance on suicide terms shows sensitivity

    ACES

    On Friday at the American Copy Editors Society conference, The Associated Press revealed some of the upcoming changes to the 2015 AP Stylebook, and among them is updated guidance on suicide terms.

    From our earlier story with the AP’s David Minthorn:

    With stories about suicide, the AP now recommends not going into details.

    “The guidance also says that we avoid using the term committed suicide except in direct quotations from authorities.”

    Instead used “killed himself, took her own life or died by suicide.”

    “Committed in that context suggests possibly an illegal act, but in fact, laws against suicide have been repealed in the U.S., at least in certain states, and many other places,” Minthorn said, “so we’re going to avoid using that term on our own, although it’s a term that authorities widely use and we will use it while quoting authorities.”

    After those changes and others were shared at the ACES conference, ACES sent out a press release in support of the AP’s guidance on suicide terms. Read more

Michael J. Connor, recipient of the Bliven-Ganley-Rossi Career Achievement award

Editors note: We are posting articles about the special club award winners honored May 5 at the annual SPC Awards dinner.

By Mike McAndrew

Michael J. Connor speaks with a fiery passion about the importance of watchdog journalism and the public’s thirst for local news.

But economic realities pinching all of Syracuse’s media organizations means there’s fewer boots on the ground and the city’s news is being covered less thoroughly now than 10 or 20 years ago, The Post-Standard’s executive editor said.

  “I can remember a time when all or most of the three network affiliates in broadcast TV had court reporters and municipal reporters. There was pretty fierce competition in government and institutional coverage. That’s gone away. Radio reporting is almost nonexistent,” he said. “There’s less competition. There’s just fewer reporters (in Syracuse) than there were at one time. That can’t help but reduce the amount of basic reporting and contextual reporting made available to residents of the area.”

 “If fewer institutions are being covered on a regular basis because you have a smaller total reporting staff in the community, at some point readers are missing something,” he said.
 Connor — who is being awarded the Gus Bliven-Joe Ganley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award by the Syracuse Press Club — has spent his entire 36-year journalism career at The Post-Standard.
 While a student at Cornell University, he decided to pursue a newspaper career after being inspired by a speech by investigative reporter Seymour Hersh.

 Connor started out in 1976 as a bureau reporter based in Oneida. After working in a series of reporting and editing positions, he became the paper’s managing editor in 1983.
 Under Connor’s leadership, The Post-Standard in 1993 was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory journalism for a series of stories about poor medical care provided to inmates in state prisons. The prison series remains among Connor’s favorite stories published by the newspaper.

 That same year, Connor was named executive editor of The Post-Standard. When the morning paper merged in 1997 with The Herald-Journal, Connor became executive editor of the combined news operation.
 These days, the 59-year editor is overseeing the transformation of The Post-Standard from a newspaper into a news organization that delivers stories, photos, video and audio recordings to readers via the newspaper, syracuse.com, Twitter, Facebook and other social media outlets.

 “The Post-Standard is the best-read newspaper in America. Syracuse.com is one of the strongest newspaper websites in America. Why? Because of Mike Connor,” said Stephen A. Rogers, editor and publisher of The Post-Standard. “He built a great staff and pushed it to the top.”

 Connor has two sons, Jeff, 25, who is a musician, and Adam, 21, who graduates this month from the University of Vermont.

 Outside of the job, Connor spends his time biking 10 to 15 miles per day before work. On weekends, he sometimes takes 40-mile rides around Skaneateles Lake.

 He also volunteers Thursday nights at Matthew House, serving terminally-ill people at a hospice residence in Auburn.

 “It’s an extraordinary place of great peace, for families and individuals preparing for that transition, that next phase. It’s about as caring and loving a place as you can imagine,” he said.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 13 May 2012 02:03 )
 
    "Woe to that nation whose literature is cut short by the intrusion of force. This is not merely interference with freedom of the press but the sealing up of a nation’s heart, the excision of its memory."
--Alexander Solzhenitsyn

Wall of Distinction


Jerry Barsha

WSTM-TV

WSYR-AM-TV

During 32 years of reporting on Central New York radio and television, Jerry Barsha gave meaning to the term "breaking news." He broke many exclusive stories and conducted news investigations that brought him recognition from the home audience and his peers alike.
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