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Poynter.
  • No Thanksgiving holiday for St. Louis Post-Dispatch journalists who cover Ferguson

    Some journalists at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch won’t be able to take Thanksgiving off, Post-Dispatch Editor Gilbert Bailon tells Poynter.

    “Only those who are directly involved in covering the Ferguson story,” Bailon writes in an email. Affected journalists work in the metro, business, photo and design and production pods. “That includes editors,” Bailon writes. “A few people already are on vacation. Features and Sports are unaffected.”

    Newsroom staff @stltoday received word that Thanksgiving vacations are canceled. I've yet to hear one person complain.

    — elisacrouch (@elisacrouch) November 25, 2014

    Read more
  • Judge orders Connecticut publication to hold story

    Connecticut Law Tribune

    Stephen Frazzini, a judge in New Britain, Connecticut’s Superior Court, has forbidden Connecticut Law Tribune to publish an article, Thomas B. Scheffey reports. The article, by Isaac Avilucea, concerns a document published, apparently by mistake, on the Connecticut Judicial Branch’s website.

    The Law Tribune says the order is unconstitutional prior restraint, and has filed a motion asking it be lifted. The publication’s lawyer, Daniel Klau, tells Scheffey “I am actually under a restraining order about what I can tell my own client” and that “in a child protection case on the juvenile court docket, the court granted a party’s request for an injunction barring the Connecticut Law Tribune from publishing information that it lawfully obtained about the case.”

    Earlier this month a judge in Fulton County, Georgia, lifted an order that forbade news outlets from publishing a story about a school-cheating case, realizing it was made in “error.”

    Avilucea, who has turned up in Poynter stories before (1, 2) said in a phone call that Monday was his last day at the Law Tribune: He’s headed to The Trentonian. Read more

  • Fox News reporter talks about getting camera busted in Ferguson

    Fox News reporter Steve Harrigan was covering the unrest Monday night in Ferguson, Missouri, when someone in the crowd busted his photographer’s camera.

    “When we got there initally we were surrounded by eight or 10 young men calling me Darren Wilson,” Harrigan said by phone. But then glass broke on a nearby store, and that “distracted people,” Harrigan said.

    Harrigan in Ferguson.

    Harrigan in Ferguson.

    He tried to show some of the goods getting looted when a smaller group — maybe four or five people — set upon him and camera operator Dutch Wargo. “I think there was some unhappiness we were showing looting,” Harrigan said.

    One person shouted “Fuck Fox!” Another smashed the camera to the ground, disabling it. Harrigan and Wargo broadcast from iPhones while Wargo got his backup camera operating.

    Steve Harrigan, who is normally based in Miami, has been in Ferguson for 11 days and also covered Ferguson in August. Read more

Michael J. Connor, recipient of the Bliven-Ganley-Rossi Career Achievement award

Editors note: We are posting articles about the special club award winners honored May 5 at the annual SPC Awards dinner.

By Mike McAndrew

Michael J. Connor speaks with a fiery passion about the importance of watchdog journalism and the public’s thirst for local news.

But economic realities pinching all of Syracuse’s media organizations means there’s fewer boots on the ground and the city’s news is being covered less thoroughly now than 10 or 20 years ago, The Post-Standard’s executive editor said.

  “I can remember a time when all or most of the three network affiliates in broadcast TV had court reporters and municipal reporters. There was pretty fierce competition in government and institutional coverage. That’s gone away. Radio reporting is almost nonexistent,” he said. “There’s less competition. There’s just fewer reporters (in Syracuse) than there were at one time. That can’t help but reduce the amount of basic reporting and contextual reporting made available to residents of the area.”

 “If fewer institutions are being covered on a regular basis because you have a smaller total reporting staff in the community, at some point readers are missing something,” he said.
 Connor — who is being awarded the Gus Bliven-Joe Ganley-Mario Rossi Career Achievement Award by the Syracuse Press Club — has spent his entire 36-year journalism career at The Post-Standard.
 While a student at Cornell University, he decided to pursue a newspaper career after being inspired by a speech by investigative reporter Seymour Hersh.

 Connor started out in 1976 as a bureau reporter based in Oneida. After working in a series of reporting and editing positions, he became the paper’s managing editor in 1983.
 Under Connor’s leadership, The Post-Standard in 1993 was named a Pulitzer Prize finalist for explanatory journalism for a series of stories about poor medical care provided to inmates in state prisons. The prison series remains among Connor’s favorite stories published by the newspaper.

 That same year, Connor was named executive editor of The Post-Standard. When the morning paper merged in 1997 with The Herald-Journal, Connor became executive editor of the combined news operation.
 These days, the 59-year editor is overseeing the transformation of The Post-Standard from a newspaper into a news organization that delivers stories, photos, video and audio recordings to readers via the newspaper, syracuse.com, Twitter, Facebook and other social media outlets.

 “The Post-Standard is the best-read newspaper in America. Syracuse.com is one of the strongest newspaper websites in America. Why? Because of Mike Connor,” said Stephen A. Rogers, editor and publisher of The Post-Standard. “He built a great staff and pushed it to the top.”

 Connor has two sons, Jeff, 25, who is a musician, and Adam, 21, who graduates this month from the University of Vermont.

 Outside of the job, Connor spends his time biking 10 to 15 miles per day before work. On weekends, he sometimes takes 40-mile rides around Skaneateles Lake.

 He also volunteers Thursday nights at Matthew House, serving terminally-ill people at a hospice residence in Auburn.

 “It’s an extraordinary place of great peace, for families and individuals preparing for that transition, that next phase. It’s about as caring and loving a place as you can imagine,” he said.

Last Updated ( Sunday, 13 May 2012 02:03 )
 
"Everything is being compressed into tiny tablets. You take a little pill of news every day—23 minutes—and that’s supposed to be enough."
--Walter Cronkite

Wall of Distinction


Kenneth Sparrow

Herald-Journal

Herald American

Kenneth F. Sparrow joined the Syracuse Herald in 1925 as a reporter. This followed a short stint with the Oswego Palladium, where he first worked after completing his studies at Oswego Normal School, now SUNY at Oswego.
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