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Poynter.
  • Pew’s Alan Murray will edit Fortune

    Alan Murray will leave his post as the president of the Pew Research Center to become the new editor of Fortune, Fortune announced Tuesday. Current Fortune Editor Andy Serwer “is leaving Time Inc.,” the release says. Murray left The Wall Street Journal to run Pew in 2012.

    Pew “will promptly begin a search for the new president” of the research center, Pew Charitable Trusts President and CEO Rebecca Rimel tells Poynter in a statement.

    Murray’s “experience at The Wall Street Journal gave him a keen understanding of evolving media trends, and he also brought to the job a high level of enthusiasm and appreciation for the unique attributes of the Center,” Rimel says. “His work over the last year and a half has positioned the Center well for the future. We wish him well at Fortune, a global organization with a reputation for high quality journalism.”
    Full release:

    (New York, July 22, 2014) – Alan Murray has been named Editor of Fortune, it was announced today by Todd Larsen, Executive Vice President, Time Inc. and Norman Pearlstin

    Read more
  • Circulation revenue rises at Gannett’s local papers

    Good morning. Here are 10 (OK, perhaps slightly more than 10) media stories.

    1. Gannett had a good second quarter: Broadcast revenue was “almost 88 percent higher in the quarter compared to the second quarter last year.” Publishing advertising revenue fell about 5 percent; circulation was roughly flat, and “At local domestic publishing sites, home delivery circulation revenue was up in the quarter due, in part, to strategic pricing actions associated with enhanced content.” (Gannett)
    2. Washington Post fights the “wonk wars”: The Washington Post’s new “Storyline” project is “dedicated to the power of stories to help us understand complicated, critical things,” Editor Jim Tankersley writes. (The Washington Post) | Michael Calderone takes a look: “It’s unlikely The Post would’ve launched a project like Storyline a few years ago.” (HuffPost) | Tankersley writes that as a college student he was inspired by Richard Read‘s 1998 series about french fries: “Those stories brought the crisis home in a way no textbook or straight news piece could, because at each step, they showed how global trends touched people’s lives and livelihoods.” (The Oregonian)
    3. Why corrupt politicians should avoid Vermont: Vermont has the best-covered legislature in the country, and California has the worst, Pew finds.
    Read more
  • Got writer’s block? 14 writers share how they fight the blank screen

    A few weeks ago I wrote about my bout with writer’s block, and how I needed a good “slap” to get over it. That got me thinking: how do other writers get over those moments (or hours) when the blank screen is so imposing?
    So I asked for advice from some very good writers whose work appears in print, broadcast and online.

    You’ll see that in addition to sharing a gift, they also share an understanding that writing well is the product of discipline and hard work.

    I hope their advice helps you the next time the words won’t come. Most of all, I hope they inspire you to write.

    Steve Hartman, Correspondent, CBS News

    Butch sent me an email asking me to share my thoughts about writer’s block.  His email sat in my inbox for a while. I didn’t know what to say. That is how common writer’s block is for me. In fact, I don’t even call it writer’s block. I just call it writing. There isn’t a time when words come easy for me. There isn’t a time when I don’t feel like an impostor at my keyboard. There isn’t a time when I don’t wonder, “How am I going to fool ‘em this time?”

    My key for getting past this daily hurdle is to just sit down at my keyboard and type. … Read more

Veteran broadcaster Alan Milair dies

Long-time veteran of WSYR Radio and television has died.  The family of Alan Milair says the broadcast personality and program host died.  His family provided us with this obituary:

Alan Milair, 81, of Syracuse passed away peacefully at Loretto Cunningham on April 21, 2012.  Born in Charleston, WV, he spent his boyhood there and Lewiston, PA before moving to Cortland, NY where he started his radio career @ WKRT. 

Then moving to Syracuse to work at WSYR where he had a storied 30 year career in Radio and Television.   He was an on air personality with many radio shows including “Music just for you” and several classical programs.  He created and performed in Monster Movie Matinee which ran for 16 years.  He was also a news and weather man as well as a talk show host for many years for WSYR Television. He completed his career as AM/FM Program Manager for WSYR Radio. 

Throughout his life he sat on several boards, including Onondaga Community College, Onondaga County Co-operative Extension and Crouse Hospital Foundation.

  He was also active in local theatre throughout his life.   He also enjoyed fishing, family and friends. 

He is pre-deceased by his wife, Eloise, of 31 years and Helen Anderson of 14 years, and his Son Erich Milair.  He is survived by his Daughter, Shawn Wayson (Martin), Son Dana Milair of Maine and 8 Grandchildren.      

Calling hours are 4-7pm on Tuesday April 24th at Fairchild and Meech Dewitt Chapel.   Memorial service will be held on Wednesday April 25th at 4pm at St. David’s Episcopal Church in Dewitt. 

 In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Loretto Cunningham, 7th floor, 700 E. Brighton Ave., Syracuse, NY 13205.

 

 

Last Updated ( Monday, 23 April 2012 20:00 )
 
"Freedom of the press is not an end in itself but a means to the end of [achieving] a free society."
Felix Frankfurter, Associate Justice, US Supreme Court

Wall of Distinction


Art Peterson

WIXT

WFBL

WHEN-TV, WCNY-TV

Club President: 1969

Art Peterson began his 38-year news media career "inauspiciously," he says, as a "gopher" -- sort of an office boy at the old World-Telegram in New York City.

Read more...Link

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