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Poynter.
  • Internships cause plenty of hardship and woe

    Bad internships are like ill-fated summer romances: You go into them with an open heart and all the hope in the world, only to find out after three sizzling months they were using you the whole time.

    I’ve been fortunate in my fledgling career — and my love life — to steer clear of these summertime abusers. But like almost everyone working in journalism, I endured my fair share of harrowing situations while I was still figuring out which end of the pencil was up.

    In the hopes of finding comfort in shared misery, I sent out a few tweets yesterday looking to hear about your worst internship stories. Here’s what you wrote back, on Twitter and through email:

    @Poynter I interned all summer, they hired me to freelance after. Then the company went under and they only paid half of what they owed me

    — Annie Johnson (@anneejohnson9) October 24, 2014

    @Poynter When I was a h.s. intern @WSMV, this mean guy named @atompkins made me rip & sort stories off the wire. :) #itwasafewyearsago

    — Mary Beth Mosley (@MaryBethMosley) October 23, 2014

    @Poynter Did an internship where I was tricked into running a web mag. My "boss" plagiarized content and would ask me what our purpose was.

    — Dawn Cherie Araujo (@Dawn_Cherie) October 23, 2014

    @Poynter had to contact HR 4-5 times. Last time I mentioned harassment and then they moved me to another department and another office

    — Jakob Dorph Broager (@jdbroager) October 23, 2014

    @Poynter When I left the station, The Intern was watching TV with his feet up. When I came back, he was asleep. Do better than that, kids.

    — Luke Rollins (@LukeARollins) October 23, 2014

    Steve Rhodes wrote in with this story about receiving a cold welcome when he arrived for his first day of work:

    When I arrived from Minnesota for an internship at the New Haven Register in the summer of 1988, I did as instructed and walked up the city desk on my first day to introduce myself. “Hi, I’m the new summer intern,” I said. The editors looked at me and each other and then one said, “What intern?” Apparently the managing editor of the paper, who hired me, hadn’t told anyone I’d be arriving. I was dispatched to a bureau in the middle of nowhere to basically rot for the summer. At least I survived longer than the managing editor, who was fired midway through my stay there.

    Poynter reader Robin Roger sent these stories from her business reporting internship at the Atlanta Journal-Constitution:

    I was so nervous/excited on my first day, that I got to the parking garage 30 minutes early. I walked around the building a bit before realizing that I was supposed to park in another garage to get reimbursed. When I made it back to the original garage, I realized I had locked my keys in the car, and my car had been blocking the entrance to the parking garage for 15 or 20 minutes! Needless to say the guys at the garage weren’t happy with me. I called a locksmith, and they were there in minutes to extricate my key. I ended up being only 5 minutes late to my first day on the job, but I was a sweaty, nervous mess, not the calm, cool collected intern I was when I first arrived.

    This one is more directly related to reporting:

    I was sent out to interview customers of a locally owned pharmacy that was being bought by the Eckerd chain. The Eckerd folks didn’t want me interviewing in the store, so I was approaching people in the parking lot. I didn’t get a lot of cooperation, and one woman who seemed very suspicious even asked me “How do I even know you’re with the newspaper?!” I realized at that point I had rushed out the door, forgetting to bring my hangtag ID, so I had no proof that I worked for the paper. I never left the office again without it.

    And one more:

    When China changed the way it links its currency to the U.S. dollar, I was sent to a Walmart parking lot to interview customers about how this might affect them. I had to take this very complex economic concept, explain it to people in a Walmart parking lot and then ask them how it might affect their purchasing decisions. It was a longshot at best. I got comments like “I buy all my underwear at Walmart, and I guess I’ll have to go somewhere else.” I got stuck in rush hour traffic for hours, and ended up having to call in the quotes I had gathered. I was also asked to purchase items made in China for a photo to go with the article, and when I came back with a wide variety of items, I was told by the editor that that’s not what he was looking for. He wanted me to bring back the “cheap plastic crap” that they make. I had to tell him they make a lot more than that! I ended up getting to share a byline on the front page for the story, so that made it all worthwhile.

    Former Buffalo News intern Brandon Schlager wrote in with this stemwinder about driving through a blizzard to interview for his internship:

    My story takes place in January 2014. To appreciate the importance of the setting in relation to the narrative, you must first understand that January in Buffalo inherently means lots of ice, plenty of cold and, well, you know … snow. Buffalo sometimes gets a worse rap for its weather than it deserves, but this particular winter lived up to (and probably exceeded) the stereotypes — two blizzards in a two-month span, the first of which made its way into town late on Jan. 6.

    The next morning, Jan. 7, is when I was scheduled to interview for an intern position. I remember waking up, ignorant to the warnings heeded by weathermen the night before. And with no one having called to postpone the interview, I stubbornly set out on my trek to the newsroom in downtown Buffalo (I am from a Buffalo suburb about 15 minutes away), paying no mind to the 30-50 mph winds and the minus 28 degree wind chill that came along with it.

    The snow is hardly a deterrent for Buffalonians when it comes to driving. Navigating the flurries becomes second nature in time. So no big deal. The drive was a bit trickier than usual, but I made it to One News Plaza with 15 minutes to spare, proud of my punctuality. I won’t soon forget the look I received when I told the receptionist I had arrived to interview for an internship.

    She said something along the lines of, “You could have been two hours late and I don’t think anyone would have blamed you for it.”

    When I met with my interviewer, he was quick to share that the newsroom was particularly hectic because many of the reporters couldn’t make it into the office that day. They were stuck at home.

    Twelve to 18 inches of snow fell before Jan. 7 ran its course. The Sabres-Hurricanes hockey game scheduled for that night was cancelled. It was the first technical blizzard in Buffalo in 20 years, since 1993. Another one followed in March. We had a great run.

    Long story short, the interviews went well, I got the position and enjoyed a great (and sunny) summer with The Buffalo News.

    Do you have any terrible internship stories you’d like to be included here? Send me an email at bmullin@poynter.org, and I’ll add it to the article.

    Read more
  • Canadian ban on printing Rehtaeh Parsons’ name extends to advertisements, family finds

    Canada won’t allow its journalists to print Rehtaeh Parsons’ name, because she was a victim of child pornography. That ban extends to advertising, too, one of Parsons’ family members has found, even if an ad only includes what could be considered an oblique reference to the court case that invoked the publication ban.

    Rehtaeh Parsons (Photograph courtesy Courtesy Glen Canning and Leah Parsons)

    Rehtaeh Parsons (Photograph courtesy Courtesy Glen Canning and Leah Parsons)

    Rehtaeh Parsons died last year, and last month a young man pleaded guilty to taking a photograph that led to her being bullied and tormented. But Nova Scotia media could only refer to the plea as being in conjunction with a “high-profile child pornography case.”

    Rehtaeh Parsons’ uncle, Jim Canning, tried to place an ad in Halifax, Nova Scotia’s Chronicle Herald, the largest newspaper in the province, to make the connection between the conviction and his niece. But the paper refused, concerned such an ad would violate the publication ban.

    “I was pretty disappointed,” Jim Canning said. “We just wanted to say ‘Rehtaeh Parsons is her name.’ That’s it. We would have been fine with that.”

    Rehtaeh Parsons’ case attained worldwide notoriety last April, when she committed suicide after months of cyber-bullying. Her ordeal began after a photo got shared of her leaning out a window puking while a boy penetrated her from behind.

    She claimed she was raped by this boy and three others, but the boys say the sex was consensual and occurred at an alcohol-fueled party.

    The Royal Canadian Mounted Police in Nova Scotia investigated the matter for several months but never seized the boys’ cellphones and didn’t speak to the accused for 10 months. When the police finally took their evidence to the Nova Scotia Public Prosecution Service, the Crown Attorney that reviewed the file refused to prosecute because she didn’t think the likelihood of a conviction was high enough.

    After Rehtaeh’s death, her mother, Leah, turned to social media to tell her daughter’s story. The hacker collective Anonymous got involved and intense pressure from them, the public, and the provincial government prompted the police to re-open the case.

    New evidence turned up and was given to Halifax police, who laid charges in August 2013 — but not for sexual assault. They charged two boys: one with production and distribution of child pornography and one with distribution of child pornography.

    There is a statutory ban on the naming of victims in child pornography cases in Canada, yet the media continued to name Rehtaeh Parsons until April 2014, when Nova Scotia Provincial Court Judge Jamie Campbell ordered the ban. Rehtaeh’s parents opposed the order, as did Alex Smith, an Ontario Crown Prosecutor brought in to handle the case.

    Four Nova Scotia media outlets hired lawyer Nancy Rubin to fight the ban, but Campbell said the statute gave him no leeway. Because the law protects the victims of child pornography, he was not prepared to forge a ruling that could be misconstrued in the future.

    Martin Herschorn, Nova Scotia’s Director of Public Prosecutions, and Lena Metlege Diab, the Attorney General of Nova Scotia, said they couldn’t promise to not prosecute any journalists who broke the ban until it was violated.

    That presented media outlets with a perfect Catch-22: The media couldn’t name Rehtaeh Parsons, and the only way to create a legal path to use her name in covering this case was for a journalist to break the law.

    Rehtaeh Parsons’ parents openly flouted the ban. They started a social media campaign and made T-shirts and buttons with the slogan “Rehtaeh Parsons is her name.”

    I broke the ban on my blog, and other media outlets picked up the story including Slate, BuzzFeed, The Guardian, and the BBC.

    But no mainstream Canadian media followed, which is why Rehtaeh Parsons’ uncle, Jim Canning, took it upon himself to try to place an ad in The Chronicle Herald.

    He sent the paper the copy he wanted in the ad:

    Her name is Rehtaeh Parsons.
    She was raped at 15.
    She was bullied and died by suicide at 17.
    And then we banned her name.

    The Chronicle Herald objected to the last line referencing the ban and asked Canning if he would remove it. He said yes, and then the ad got reviewed again.

    “They were still too worried about it, even though basically at this point it’s just saying her name,” said Canning.

    He said the advertising executive he was speaking with told him “it’s kind of implied that you’re talking about the ban,” Canning said. “I thought that was just ridiculous.”

    Chronicle Herald Associate Publisher Ian Thompson told me it was purely a legal issue for the paper.

    “We got advice to say that we would be in violation of the ban if we ran that ad,” Thompson said. “We would have been happy to run the ad, but we don’t want to run afoul of the law.”

    Days after rejecting Canning’s ad the Herald ran a story by The Canadian Press on Oct. 1 in which it named Rehtaeh Parsons.

    “We’ve run her name many times, but it’s in the context of that particular court action where the ban comes into play,” Thompson said.

    When asked how the wire story about an anti-cyberbullying curriculum was different than the ad proposed by Canning, Thompson said when it comes to the law “there are often gray areas, and that’s why there are lawyers.”

    Put simply, the Herald asked these questions when considering Canning’s ad: “Would it be seen by the court as an attempt to overcome what Judge Campbell had said and was this an attempt to do from the back door what the court said you can’t do in the front door?” Thompson said.

    Toronto lawyer Brian Rogers says you have to consider Jim Canning’s intent, which Rogers says is to get around the ban.

    Photograph courtesy Glen Canning and Leah Parson

    Photograph courtesy Glen Canning and Leah Parson

    “Even taking that last line out, that’s still the intended purpose of the ad,” Rogers said. Even though the CP story mentions that Rehtaeh was the victim of cyber-bullying, and that this entailed the taking and distribution of the photograph, which is the crux of the child-pornography case, it’s different.

    “I can appreciate that some people may scratch their heads and wonder about the distinction, but it is one,” Rogers said.

    Rogers stressed that he wasn’t prepared to second-guess the advice the Chronicle Herald received, but he does understand the basis on which they made their decision.

    “It’s clear that the intent of the ad is to subvert the ban, whereas the other is an article talking about cyber-bullying legislation,” he said.

    He also agreed that the words in the ad, which echo those in the social media campaign by Glen Canning and Leah Parsons – an open defiance of the ban – would also be a factor worth considering.

    “This is by no means a simple black-and-white situation and you would take into account all kinds of factors,” Rogers said. “It’s really a matter for the client to decide what risk they are prepared to take. There are circumstances in which clients are more prepared to take risks than others.”

    In this case, The Chronicle Herald decided it wasn’t prepared to take the risk.

    “Lawyers are always going to take the most risk-averse approach to most things, so the advice isn’t surprising,” Jim Canning said. “But when you make business decisions or moral decisions, you don’t just solely base it off of what your lawyer tells you or no one would ever do anything.”

    Two Chronicle Herald journalists, Selena Ross and Frances Willick, shared a national newspaper award for their investigative work into the Rehtaeh Parsons case, so it’s unfortunate that their coverage has been hampered by this ban.

    “I do personally hope the ban won’t be enforced and that we can get away from this stilted, ineffective coverage,” Ross said.

    Thompson said, “Rehtaeh Parsons’ name will appear in our newspaper again – obviously.”

    It’s a name that carries power and brings weight to any discussion about sexual consent, cyber-bullying or suicide prevention, Canning said.

    “I think the name is important, just like my brother [Rehtaeh's father, Glen] does,” Canning said. “I just wanted to kind of make a statement: ‘Don’t forget her.’

    Read more
  • The Globe rolls out red carpet for documentary film

    This year, editors at The Boston Globe noticed that they shared something important with Hollywood’s biggest night: three directors, all trained at nearby Harvard University, each got Oscar nods for documentary filmmaking.

    That got the paper’s attention. Globe editors had known for awhile that New England was a hotbed for documentarians, with big names like Ken Burns and Errol Morris calling the region home. The arts staff, under film editor Janice Page, had long discussed expanding the paper’s coverage of documentary filmmaking; now they had a newspeg.

    Now, a few months later, The Boston Globe is rolling out a red carpet of its own for the region’s filmmakers and cinephiles. On Thursday, the paper announced GlobeDocs, a bid to celebrate the city’s nonfiction film scene. The initiative, headed up by Page, will include a series of free screenings (at least one every month) at independent theaters throughout Boston that will include panel discussions with filmmakers and industry experts. The paper is currently working to identify advertisers to sponsor the screenings, said Boston Globe CEO Mike Sheehan.

    In an effort to become a hub for the film community, The Globe is also planning to put on a film festival sometime in 2015 and has begun a fund “to support up-and-coming filmmakers,” according to a release announcing GlobeDocs.

    In the weeks leading up to Thursday’s announcement, the paper was already beefing up its documentary coverage. Earlier this month, The Globe began devoting a full page of its Sunday arts section to nonfiction film. The paper brought aboard Peter Keough, the former film editor of the now-defunct Boston Phoenix, to anchor the section; he writes a weekly roundup of the region’s documentary news called “Doc Talk” and asks a prominent movie-lover for recommendations in a feature called “Documania.”

    Close watchers of The Globe will notice this isn’t the first time the paper has invested in specialized coverage of the city. This year, the paper rolled out two standalone sites — BetaBoston and Crux — to chronicle the startup and Catholic communities, respectively. In June, the paper added a Friday print section, “Capital,” dedicated exclusively to politics coverage. And there will likely be more specialized verticals to follow, Sheehan said.

    The homepage of Crux, The Boston Globe's new vertical for Catholic news.

    The homepage of Crux, The Boston Globe’s new vertical for Catholic news.

    And as with the other new initiatives, The Globe is planning to kick off GlobeDocs with a live event — in this case, a screening of “The Irish Pub,” featuring a discussion with director Alex Fegan moderated by Globe columnist Kevin Cullen. This echoes other launch events held for verticals like Crux and Capital.

    The business thinking behind these live meetups — from next year’s film festival to events the paper’s has been putting on for years — is to position The Globe to become a convener of the community in addition to its chronicler, Sheehan said. The events, which build and showcase the verticals’ respective audiences, have the potential to indirectly drive revenue by making them more attractive to advertisers.

    “Newspapers were traditionally experienced in someone’s hand, something someone read,” Sheehan said. “At their best today, newspapers are something that bring people together.”

    Read more
Winners announced for 2011 awards contest
I wanted to thank every media organization that entered the 2011 2011 Syracuse Press Club Professional Recognition Awards Contest. We had twice as many entries this year as we did in 2011. The competition was fierce.
 
Attached are identical lists of the winners. The first attachment is in a Word docx file and the second is in an older version of a Word doc file.
 
Congratulations to all of the winners!
 
Whether you won or not, we hope that you will join us and celebrate the best of CNY journalism at the Press Club’s annual awards banquet on May 5 at Drumlins Country Club, 800 Nottingham Road, Syracuse, NY. Cocktails will be at 6 p.m. Dinner and the program will begin at 7 p.m. We will be accepting reservations for the dinner here beginning April 2. Please make your reservation ASAP. Tickets are $40, $380 for a table of 10.
 
If you did not submit any entries for this year’s contest, we hope you will join the fun in January 2013 when we will be accepting entries again.
 
(All decisions of the judges are final. But please notify us ASAP if you spot any errors in a contestant’s name or any other information in the list of winners.) 
 
Mike McAndrew,
Awards Committee Chair
 

Winners in the 2011 Syracuse Press Club Professional Recognition Awards Contest

 

COLLEGE STUDENT JOURNALISM

Best Print Feature Story

1st Place, Ashley M. Casey, The Dolphin, ‘Rhinoceros’ provokes thought, giggles from audience; 2nd Place, Eva de Charleroy, The Overview, Bistro falls short on service to campus

Best Print News Story

1st Place, Ryan Gavin, The Overview, Campus-based YMCA opens doors; 2nd Place, Kevin Carr, The Overview, Sculpture dedication marks beginning of anniversary commemoration

Best Print Sports Story

1st Place, Matthew Clark, The Dolphin, Spadine's game winner keeps Dolphins afloat; 2nd Place, Pete Schneider, The Overview, OCC athletics lauded for sportsmanship

Best Radio Sports Story

1st Place, Chet Davis, NCC News & WAER, How Tulane keeps pushing for the return of an on-campus stadium; 2nd Place, Bill Spaulding, NCC News & WAER, SU Marching Band

Best Radio News Story 

1st Place, Matt Johnston, WRVO, Central NY man brings Santa to special needs children; 2nd Place,  Durrie Bouscaren, NCC News & WAER, 7-11-11 Southern Sudanese community celebrates first Independence Day

Best Radio Feature Story

1st Place, Matt Johnston, WRVO, Quilt exhibition educates people about AIDS awareness

Best TV News Story

1st Place, Marlei Martinez, NCC News & ABC News OnCampus, From infantryman to freshman; 2nd Place,  Danielle Waugh, NCC News & ABC News OnCampus, Fighting childhood obesity with books

Best TV Feature Story

1st Place, Matt Phifer, NCC News & ABC News OnCampus, Football walk-on shares his story; 2nd Place, Clay LePard, Ryan Koletty, Nena Garga, Bill Sharp, NCC News & CitrusTV, CitrusTV visits the Syracuse zoo

Best TV Sports Story

1st Place, Clay LePard, NCC News & ESPNU, Syracuse racer; 2nd Place,  David DeGuzman, Ted Goldberg, Caleb Lamb, Ryan Koletty, NCC News & Citrus TV, We still remember

 

DAILY NEWSPAPER

Spot News

1st Place, Staff, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Flood of 2011:  worse than '06; 2nd Place, Emily Kulkus, Mike Waters, Mike McAndrew, Bud Poliquin, The Post-Standard, Bernie Fine fired

Investigative Story

1st Place, Tim Knauss, The Post-Standard, Political contributions returned; 2nd Place, John O'Brien, Catie O'Toole, Fernando Alfonso, The Post-Standard, Jordan-Elbridge

News Feature

1st Place, Jennifer Micale, Valerie Zehl, Press & Sun-Bulletin, When care can't wait ... but it does; 2nd Place, Staff, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Protecting our children

Human Interest Feature              

1st Place, Jon Campbell, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Who was Whitney Titus?; 2nd Place,  Renee Gadoua, The Post-Standard, Mother Marianne: The saint from Syracuse

Front Page Design

1st Place, John Catlett, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Designs by John Catlett; 2nd Place,  Tom Schmitt, The Post-Standard, Front pages by Tom Schmitt

Sports Story

1st Place, Joy Lindsay, Kevin Stevens, Mike Mangan, Press & Sun-Bulletin, SENSATIONAL! B-Sens capture city's first pro hockey title; 2nd Place, Andrew Legare, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Concussions

 

ALL PRINT

Still Photos - Photo Portrait

1st Place, Mike Greenlar, The Post-Standard, First homicide victim of 2011; 2nd Place, Connie Berry, The Catholic Sun, Young girls from Kenya

Still Photos - Scenic Photo

1st Place, Dennis Nett, The Post-Standard, Clinton Square; 2nd Place, Peter Chen, The Post-Standard, Fall Beauty in the Adirondacks

Still Photos - Sports Photo

1st Place, Dennis Nett, The Post-Standard, From the sidelines; 2nd Place,  Herm Card, City Eagle, Lessons learned outside the classroom

Still Photos - Photo Illustration

1st Place, Christa Lemczak, The Post-Standard, Photo Illustration by Christa Lemczak; 2nd Place,  Peter Allen, The Post-Standard, Photo Illustration by Peter Allen

Still Photos - Photo Essay

1st Place, Frank Ordonez, The Post-Standard, Kicking cancer; 2nd Place,  Nicholas Lisi, The Post-Standard, Bald eagles on Onondaga Lake

Still Photos - Feature Photos

1st Place, David Lassman, The Post-Standard, Say Yes!; 2nd Place, Seth Harrison, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Health risks everywhere

Still Photos - Carl Single Award for Spot News Photos

1st Place,  Gary Walts, The Post-Standard, Drone arrests; 2nd Place,  Casey Staff, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Fearing the worst

Critique

1st Place, James MacKillop, Syracuse New Times, Bohemian Rhapsody; 2nd Place, Rabbi Rachel Esserman, The Reporter, Trash or treasure

Editorial

1st Place, Renee Gadoua, The Post-Standard, Practice what you preach; 2nd Place, Ned Campbell, Eagle Bulletin, Mannion made a contest a contest

Headline Writing

1st Place, Mark Libbon, The Post-Standard, Headlines by Mark Libbon; 2nd Place,  Al Vieira, Press & Sun-Bulletin, Headlines by Al Viera

Magazine

1st Place, Tim Atseff, Peter Allen, Linda Bien, CNY The Good Life; 2nd Place, 2nd Place,  Karen Sherwood, Jennifer Creighton, Bud Poliquin, Mark Libbon, CNY Sports

 

NON-DAILY NEWSPAPER

Human Interest Feature              

1st Place, Molly English-Bowers, Chris Baker, Michael Elliott, Ed Griffin-Nolan, Syracuse New Times, The Fab Four; 2nd Place,  Sarah Hall, Eagle Star-Review, Taking a stand against suicide

Robert Haggart Award for Best Column

1st Place, Jason Emerson, Skaneateles Press, Some of us need to remember: Football is only a game; 2nd Place, Ed Griffin-Nolan, Syracuse New Times, The shame game

Sports Story

1st Place, Kevin Corbett, Syracuse New Times, Shoot to chill; 2nd Place, Erin Smith Wisneski, Baldwinsville Messenger, State golf champ!

Investigative Story

Carol Thompson, The Valley News, County clerk vendor under investigation in Essex County; 2nd Place,  Carol Thompson, The Valley News, County to return five permits to City of Oswego

News Feature

1st Place, Sarah Hall, Eagle Star-Review, Ending the epidemic; 2nd Place,  Ed Griffin-Nolan, Syracuse New Times, Hydrofracking

Front Page Design

1st Place, Michael Davis, James Rutkey, Meaghan Arbital, Syracuse New Times; 2nd Place, Ami Olson, Doug Campbell, Jen Wing, Ken Jackson, Urban CNY Newspaper

 

ONLINE JOURNALISM

News Website

1st Place, Staff, Becky Combes, Ginger Whitaker, Teresa Riley, ynn.com; 2nd Place, Staff, wktv.com

Blog

1st Place, Matt Mulcahy, cnycentral.com, Matt’s Memo: Sweet dreams Angel; 2nd Place, Katie Gibas, ynn.com, Give it a tri  

Video Journalism

1st Place, Steven J. Pallone, Syracuse.com; 2nd Place, Ellen M. Blalock, Syracuse.com

Still Photos - Photo Essay

1st Place, The Post-Standard Staff, Syracuse.com, Fall beauty in the Adirondack Park; 2nd Place,  Stephen D. Cannerelli, Syracuse.com, Southern Tier flooding aftermath - Owego cleans up

Public Service

1st Place, Jeff Platsky, Staff, pressconnects.com, Data Center; 2nd Place,  Peter M. Naughton, CNYradio.com/CNYtvnews.com

 

RADIO

Public Affairs Program

1st Place, Emma Jacobs, Rachel Ward, Mark Lavonier, WRVO, Innovation conversation: Following the power lines; 2nd Place, Fergus Nicoll, Fred Vigeant , Mark Lavonier, WRVO, Community forum - culture under siege in Pakistan

News Feature

1st Place, Joyce Gramza, WRVO, Transforming long term care in CNY; 2nd Place,  John Smith, WAER, Syracuse Tech Garden entreprenuers

Investigative Story

1st Place, Joyce Gramza, WRVO, Prom, body image and eating disorders; 2nd Place,  Ellen Abbott, WRVO, Concussions

Sports Story

1st Place, Kevin Barry, WAER, Penn State scandal reactions; 2nd Place,  Adam Feldfogel, WAER, Dyshawn Davis, special relationship with coach

Spot News

1st Place, Chris Bolt, WAER, 99 percent and Jobs Act at bridge                                   

Human Interest Feature

1st Place, Ellen Abbott, WRVO, Central New York woman helps heal the sick with music; 2nd Place,  A. Randall Wenner, Freelance, Remembering the Cardiff Giant

 

 

SPECIAL INTEREST PRINT

News Feature

1st Place, Jeanne Albanese, CNY Business Exchange, Crucible's hot idea; 2nd Place,  Dave Tobin, CNY The Good Life, Aurora after Pleasant

Sports Story

1st Place, Farah Jadran, Syracuse Woman Magazine, Mother, wife, professional...triathlete; 2nd Place,  Jessica Zurell, Cammi Clark, Kimberly Cook, Amy Fields, Today's CNY Woman, Queen of Heights

Robert Haggart Award for Best Column

1st Place, Bud Poliquin, CNY Sports, Great Success at Colgate, but with a tinge of 'what if?'; 2nd Place,  Barbara Stith, CNY The Good Life, Reading recipes between the lines

Human Interest Feature

1st Place, Mark Libbon, CNY The Good Life, Rosamond Gifford's battle of wills; 2nd Place, Farah Jadran, Syracuse Woman Magazine, Pregnant and battling breast cancer... now what?

 

TV

Documentary

1st Place, Curtis Jetter, YNN, After the storm; 2nd Place,  Brian Dwyer, Curtis Jetter, YNN, Force on force

Special Program

1st Place, Jim Beebe, Tim Fox, WSYR TV, Lion King; 2nd Place,  News Staff, WKTV, Boilermaker 2011

Spot News

1st Place, Staff, WSYR TV, Flooding   9/8/11; 2nd Place, Staff, YNN, Flooding ravages Southern Tier

Investigative Story

1st Place, Katie Alexander, WWNY, The war within - combating military suicides; 2nd Place,  Christie Casciano, Jack Estabrook, WSYR TV, Targeting gang violence

News Feature

1st Place, Tim Fisher, WKTV, Heartbreak on Schuyler Street; 2nd Place,  Alex Dunbar, CNY Central, School kids Grammy nomination

Human Interest Feature

Bill Carey,  Jay Hy, Tom Walters, YNN, Following Lincoln's trail home; 2nd Place, Staff, YNN, Your hometown

Sports Story

1st Place, Andy Malnoske, WENY, Acceptance: Troy's Greg Congdon battles homophobia; 2nd Place,  Andy Malnoske, WENY, Beating the odds: Trevor Umlah

Video Journalism

1st Place, Keith Kobland, Phil Rankin, Luke Eggleston, Liz McDougall, WSYR TV, Video journalism; 2nd Place, Jim Beebe, WSYR TV, Video journalism

Video Essay

1st Place, Scott Irving, WSYR TV, Winter day at the zoo; 2nd Place,  Jason Hy, YNN, Lake Ontario's rich history

Sports Show

1st Place, Staff, YNN, First and 10; 2nd Place,  Lindsay Liquori, Sal Maneen, Steve Infanti, WSYR TV, SU basketball NCAA preview

Regularly Scheduled Local Newscast

1st Place, Kristy Smorol, CNY Central, Major flood and homicide arrest; 2nd Place,  Staff, WSYR TV, Bernie Fine fired 
Last Updated ( Tuesday, 27 March 2012 00:03 )
 
    "Their constant yelping about a free press means, with a few honorable exceptions, freedom to peddle scandal, crime, sex, sensationalism, hate, innuendo and the political and financial uses of propaganda. A newspaper is a business out to make money through advertising revenue. That is predicated on the circulation and you know what circulation depends on."
--Raymond Chandler

Wall of Distinction


Karel "Bud" Vanderveer

Herald-Journal

Herald American

Shortly after graduating from Syracuse's Central High School in 1939, Bud Vanderveer joined the Herald-Journal. However, it wasn't until he returned from service with the U.S. Army in World War II that he began covering sports full-time - the career that made him one of the most respected and best-known sports writers in New York State.
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