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  • Why the Toronto Star unpublished an article about race

    On Thursday, the Toronto Star published an article by Natasha Grzincic called “5 other labels for people of colour er… non-whites uh… racialized people.” Later that day, it took the article down.

    The article, still available at partner sites like this one, notes that the Ontario Human Rights Commission has settled on the term “racialized” to describe people instead of using what it calls “more outdated and inaccurate terms” like “racial minority” or “non-white.”

    The Star doesn’t have a style on using the term “racialized,” Public Editor Kathy English says in an email. Its style guide currently says to use the term “visible minority” rather than “nonwhite.” (The Star urges journalists to not refer to “colour or ethnicity unless it is relevant to the story.”)

    Grzincic’s article looks at how “visible minority” and other terms are deployed. For example:

    Ethnic minorities

    Like “visible minority,” there’s the problem with “minority,” which could have a subordinate meaning. Same goes for “marginalized groups.”

    Non-white

    Non-preferred, because it defines people by what they are not. Used by StatCan to define visible minorities.

    English says her office began to receive complaints that the article “made light of a sensitive, serious subject” not long after it was published. English said she discussed the article with Star Managing Editor Jane Davenport, who she said had not seen the piece before it went up.

    Davenport thought the story should come down, so the Star doinked it and appended a note “In line with the Star’s transparency goals,” English said.

    “Davenport’s view of the piece – which I agree with — is that a discussion of how visible minorities should be ‘labeled’ is inappropriate material for a listicle,” she writes. She continues:

    The piece was flippant and commented on instead of reporting on the Ontario Human Rights Commission’s arguments. The writer of the piece is not a columnist with latitude to make such comment.

    The Star is trying to find other outlets that published the piece and inform them it has removed it, English said. Further, “The newsroom is also looking further into the circumstances of the article being published.”

    Read more
  • This weekend, one last get-together at the Minneapolis Star Tribune
    The cover of the Minneapolis Star Tribune's homecoming publication. This image is courtesy of the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

    The cover of the Minneapolis Star Tribune’s homecoming publication. This image is courtesy of the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

    On Saturday, Nov. 1, current and former employees of the Minneapolis Star Tribune can walk through most of the building that has been the home of the newspaper since 1920.

    By next summer, the Star Tribune will be in a new space, and the building at 425 Portland Ave. will be gone, or close to it.

    “There’s certainly some nostalgia,” said Steve Yaeger, the Star Tribune’s vice president of marketing and public relations, in a phone interview. “I would say overall — this is not the PR spin — we really are more excited about getting to the new place. Our building is very old and it was built for a very different news organization than what we have.”

    There are people who work there today, though, who’ve spent their whole careers in that building, Yaeger said. Many are attached to the space, and not just people who work there now, but people who once did.

    So on Saturday, the Star Tribune is having a homecoming. So far, about 700 people have RSVP’d, but Yaeger expects around 1,000.

    “Some people will want to hug the building,” Yaeger said, “some people will just want to see the press operators they used to work the same shift with.”

    A postcard from the Star-Tribune in 1950. This image is courtesy of the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

    A postcard from the Star Tribune in 1950. This image is courtesy of the Minneapolis Star Tribune.

    People can walk through three of the four floors of the building — to see where the presses and the mailroom once were. They’ll see images along the way of how the building has changed. In one hallway, there’s a 30-foot-long timeline that shows things that have happened at 425 Portland Ave. There’s food, of course, and speeches and the chance to catch up with old friends.

    “It’s not just about the building,” Yaeger said. “It’s about the interactions in this building. A building is just a building in the end.”

    The Star Tribune no longer owns that building, they’ve leased it through June 30 of next year, when they’ll be out for good and the building will come down as part of a redevelopment plan.

    “The challenge for all of us, as we move, is to remain places of character,” Yaeger said. “We don’t want it to be bland. If it’s bland, we’ve lost something.”

    Here are some other newsrooms that no longer live in their original buildings. I know there’s a lot to add here, and I will try and update this, so please send me suggestions at khare@poynter.org or @kristenhare.

    Minneapolis Star Tribune

    starjournal

    Built: 1920

    Sold: 2013. The building will be torn down in 2015. Some demolition has begun.

    Now: The Star Tribune still operates out of the building, which it is currently leasing. They’ll move to 650 Third Ave. S by the end of June 2015 at the latest.

    (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

    Boston Herald

    Nice shot from the old @bostonherald and future #inkblock site as local artist Cyrille Conan paints his mural. #thinkink #boston #southend #sky #city #news

    A photo posted by Ink Block Boston (@inkblockboston) on Feb 2, 2013 at 9:23am PST

    Built: 1957

    Sold: 1998, then leased back. It was torn down in 2013. Herald photographer John Wilcox photographed a ceremony with Ink Block, which took over the space.

    Now: Condos.

    Miami Herald

    The Miami Herald building is seen Wednesday, April 23, 2008 in Miami.  (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    The Miami Herald building is seen Wednesday, April 23, 2008 in Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Built: 1963

    Sold: 2011, moved in 2013

    Now: Demolition started this year. In May, Selima Hussain wrote “9 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About The Old Miami Herald Building,” for WLRN.

    7. The materials used to build it

    1HP boasted mahogany paneling, two kinds of granite (gray on the facade, red-veined on certain interior walls) chattahoochee rock and yellow ceramic tiles, according to Ibby Vores, Miami Herald human resources manager.

    “It was impressive… there was all of this lifted space and a terrazzo floor, marble on the walls,” she says. “At the time it was built, it was an icon of the future.”

    In April of last year, Erik Bojnansky wrote “Farewell, My Lovely Miami Herald,” for the Biscayne Times.

    Now: Demolition has been slow and is still happening. The new development is supposed to include a hotel and casino.

    Work continues on the former headquarters of the Miami Herald building on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 in Miami.  Demolition on the south wing of the former headquarters began last Monday.  Genting, a Malaysian casino company, purchased the waterfront property in May, 2011, for $236 million, and plans to build a condo and hotel resort on the 14-acre site. The Miami Herald moved to Doral, Fla., in 2013. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    Work continues on the former headquarters of the Miami Herald building on Wednesday, April 30, 2014 in Miami. Demolition on the south wing of the former headquarters began last Monday. Genting, a Malaysian casino company, purchased the waterfront property in May, 2011, for $236 million, and plans to build a condo and hotel resort on the 14-acre site. The Miami Herald moved to Doral, Fla., in 2013. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    The Philadelphia Inquirer

    (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = "//connect.facebook.net/en_US/all.js#xfbml=1"; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, 'script', 'facebook-jssdk'));

    Built: 1924

    Sold: 2011

    Now: It’s supposed to be redeveloped into a casino, but that hasn’t happened yet.

    Photographer Will Steacy successfully launched a Kickstarter campaign, which raised more than $26,000 from a $15,000 goal. Steacy spent five years photographing the Inquirer newsroom and is now writing a book with the help of the Kickstarter funds.

    There’s also a Facebook page with images from the Inquirer’s last days in the building.

    Los Angeles Herald-Examiner

    Director Richard Brooks, center, discusses a scene with actors John Saxon, left, and Ryan O'Neal, right, on the set of the motion picture "The Fever," in the city room of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, on December 11, 1984, in Los Angeles, California. (AP Photo/Liu Heung Shing)

    Director Richard Brooks, center, discusses a scene with actors John Saxon, left, and Ryan O’Neal, right, on the set of the motion picture “The Fever,” in the city room of the Los Angeles Herald-Examiner, on December 11, 1984, in Los Angeles, California. (AP Photo/Liu Heung Shing)

    Built: 1913

    Closed: 1989

    Now: You can film movies on sets there.

    Follow @kristenhare
    !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');

    Here are more buildings and moves I heard about today. I’m just listing them for now but will add more.

    – Detroit Free Press and Detroit News
    Kalamazoo Gazette
    Grand Rapids Press
    Ann Arbor News
    Muskegon Chronicle
    Indianapolis Star
    Oregonian
    Seattle Times
    Seattle P-I
    Times-Picayune
    New York Daily News
    The New York Times
    The (Syracuse) Post-Standard
    The Marion Star
    The Daily Oklahoman
    Fort Worth Star-Telegram
    Santa Cruz Sentinel

    Read more
  • Public fear and ‘an abundance of caution’

    I wonder how George Orwell would react to a phrase that has been repeated time and again by government and university officials to justify recent stringent actions — such as quarantines and dis-invitations — in response to the Ebola crisis.

    These officials say they are acting “out of an abundance of caution.”

    It seems to be one of the phrases of the day, expressed by leaders who are trying to limit or eliminate contact, not just with sick people or people who have cared for the sick, but with almost anyone who has worked or traveled through countries where Ebola has spread.

    Orwell was a famous critic of political speech, especially of the kind that used euphemism or passive constructions to cloud misbehavior or avoid responsibility. Mistakes, after all, are made.

    To my ears, “an abundance of caution” is a peculiar phrase. It sounds like a parody of collective nouns such as “a gaggle of geese” or “an exaltation of larks.” How much caution will you exercise, Governor? Why, an abundance of caution, of course, sir.

    “Abundance of caution” also carries the kind of tension you might find in an oxymoron (such as “jumbo shrimp”). “Abundance” is not the opposite of “caution” at the literal level. At the level of connotation, however, abundance suggests expansion while caution suggests contraction.

    Which leads me to this strategy for journalists: Any time a political figure or thought leader wants to operate “out of an abundance of caution” – especially when the risk is demonstrably slight – look for the many ways in which they are operating out of a “scarcity of caution” – my term – when the risk is great.

    Not a single American, to my knowledge, has contracted Ebola in the USA and died from the disease in the USA. On the other hand, here is a list of much more serious dangers to life and limb, based on statistics taken from the CDC. After each real danger is my fantasy of what a leader might say “out of an abundance of caution.”

    • About 35,000 Americans were killed in motor vehicle crashes in 2009. Twenty-two percent of them were people 15 to 24 years of age. “Out of an abundance of caution, we have decided to raise the legal driving age to 25, and to greatly improve the quality of mass transit in our community.”
    • 16,250 people were victims of homicide in 2010, most of them from handguns. “Out of an abundance of caution, we have decided to initiate a Constitutional Amendment that will allow reasonable restrictions on gun ownership.”
    • 38,360 Americans took their own lives in 2010. “Out of an abundance of caution, we will establish community based mental health facilities, whatever the cost, to create a safety net for those suffering from mental illness.”
    • According to the Department of Veterans Affairs, as many as 22 American war veterans, maybe more, take their own lives every day. That’s more than 8,000 per year. “Out of an abundance of caution, we have decided to multiply by ten the budget for the care of soldiers and other first responders suffering from post-traumatic stress, and will raise taxes to pay for it. Out of an even greater abundance of caution we have decided to no longer send our sons and daughters into protracted distant wars that we cannot win.”

    Fever? Headache? Muscle aches? Forget about Ebola, chances are astronomically higher that you have the flu or some other common bug. That message still hasn't reached many Americans, judging from stories ER doctors and nurses swapped this week at a Chicago medical conference. Misinformed patients with Ebola-like symptoms can take up time and resources in busy emergency rooms, and doctors fear the problem may worsen when flu season ramps up. . (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

    Fever? Headache? Muscle aches? Forget about Ebola, chances are astronomically higher that you have the flu or some other common bug. Misinformed patients with Ebola-like symptoms can take up time and resources in busy emergency rooms, and doctors fear the problem may worsen when flu season ramps up. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

    There are many more real things to be afraid of in the USA. Influenza and pneumonia caused 53,826 deaths in 2010, and yet we don’t require folks to get immunized for these common diseases. Using the logic of the governors, perhaps we should “out of an abundance of caution.”

    Here are some possible translations for various uses of the phrase “out of an abundance of caution”:

    • Because our lawyers told us to.
    • Because I know my constituents don’t believe in science.
    • Because I know my constituents don’t trust the government.
    • Because I don’t want to get blamed for something outside my control.
    • Because I don’t have the backbone to do the right thing.
    • Because I’d rather demonize heroic caregivers to make myself look decisive.
    • Because our lawyers told us to. (Oh, sorry, I already said that one.)
    Read more
Glor named weekend anchor at CBS Print
Written by Lou Gulino   
Wednesday, 11 February 2009 23:07

Former WSTM-TV staffer Jeff Glor has been promoted to the anchor desk at CBS News. Glor will serve as the anchor of the Saturday Edition of the CBS Evening News.  Glor worked at WSTM from 1997 to 2003.   Interestingly he will go head to head at the anchor desk with former WTVH  anchor David Muir, who anchors World News Saturday for ABC. 

Here is the official release from CBS News:

Jeff Glor has been named anchor of the Saturday edition of he CBS EVENING NEWS, it was announced today by Sean McManus, President,
CBS News and Sports. The appointment is effective immediately. Glor will continue as a National Correspondent reporting for all CBS News broadcasts.         

 "With his outstanding coverage of breaking news, politics and human interest stories, Jeff has been a valuable addition to our already
impressive group of correspondents," said McManus.  "He is a smart, dedicated reporter who has proven his versatility and talent both in the
field and in the anchor chair." 

Glor has been the National Correspondent for THE EARLY SHOW since March 2007 and has served as substitute anchor for the CBS EVENING NEWS. While at CBS News, Glor has covered many major domestic and international news stories, including President Obama's Inauguration,  Campaign '08, the war in Iraq, the crash of US Air Flight 1549, the  Beijing Olympic Games, the Republican National Convention and the Papal visit.  In May 2008, Glor traveled cross-country for the CBS News "Eye on the Road" series.          

Before joining CBS News, Glor served as the weekend evening news anchor and a weekday reporter for WHDH-TV in Boston, where he reported on the Pope's death from Rome and the hearings on steroid use in Major League Baseball from Washington, D.C.

Jeff Glor was born in Buffalo, N.Y.  He was graduated magna cum laude from Syracuse University in 1997 with a degree in journalism
from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications and a degree in economics from the College of Arts and Sciences. 

 
"If none of us ever read a book that was “dangerous,” had a friend who was “different” or joined an organization that advocated “change,” we would all be just the kind of people Joe McCarthy wants. Whose fault is that? Not really [McCarthy’s]. He didn’t create this situation of fear. He merely exploited it, and rather successfully."
--Edward R. Murrow

Wall of Distinction


Art Peterson

WIXT

WFBL

WHEN-TV, WCNY-TV

Club President: 1969

Art Peterson began his 38-year news media career "inauspiciously," he says, as a "gopher" -- sort of an office boy at the old World-Telegram in New York City.

Read more...Link

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