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  • Tonawanda News to fold in January

    The Buffalo News | The Tonawanda News

    Twenty employees at the Tonawanda News will lose their jobs in January after the paper closes, the Buffalo News reported Thursday.

    The Tonawanda News, a 134-year-old newspaper serving north suburban Buffalo, is closing after revenue from advertising and circulation failed to keep pace with expenses, the paper reports.

    The paper belongs to the Greater Niagara Newspapers group, which includes two other papers in the region: the Niagara Gazette and the Lockport Union-Sun and Journal, according to The Tonawanda News. Neither paper is closing.

    Read more
  • Only 1 in 5 college newspapers updates its website daily

    College Media Matters | Student Media Map

    Just 21 percent of student newspapers at public, four-year universities update their websites five days a week, according to an interactive tool launched Thursday.

    Student Media Map, a project by University of Texas senior Bobby Blanchard, compares rates of online publishing at student newspapers nationwide, Dan Reimold writes for College Media Matters.

    The map works by mining RSS feeds at 485 student newspapers throughout the United States and representing each with a colored dot based on their publishing frequency. A green dot means the site is updated at least five times per week, purple means the site is updated less frequently and red indicates the university does not have a newspaper. Private universities and some colleges in New York are missing from the map.

    The project shows that publishing frequency tends to skew in favor of larger schools — only 4 percent of newspapers at universities with fewer than 10,000 students enrolled published content five-days a week, compared to 81 percent of student newspapers at universities with between 40,000 and 50,000 students.

    The idea for the project came from a conversation that arose when the student newspaper at The University of Texas, The Daily Texan, was faced with reductions to its print frequency, Blanchard told Reimold. The newspaper vowed to maintain a steady flow of copy to its website, which made Blanchard wonder: how many papers did the same?

    You can check the map out for yourself here.

    Read more
  • 9 takeways from the New York Times Co. 3rd quarter earnings call
    The New York Times building in this 2009 file photo. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    The New York Times building in this 2009 file photo. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

    The New York Times Co. joined McClatchy yesterday in booking a rare operating loss for the third quarter, $9 million or about 2.5 percent on revenues of $364.7 million.

    But the many moving parts of the Times digital transformation effort had a number of positives mixed in as well. Here are nine takeaways:

    1. About that loss. It was driven by high costs associated with staff reductions ($20 million) and investment in new products. The first will be a one-time blip. But the Times will be launching and relaunching new digital versions for some time to come. Each is expensive to develop and market, and significant new revenues may be slow in coming.
    2. Equilibrium in ad and circulation revenues. A 17 percent year-to-year gain in digital advertising for the quarter roughly offset a 5 percent decline in print. Similarly revenue from a net gain of 44,000 digital-only subscribers offset revenue losses for print and print-digital subscriptions. That’s an achievement. On the ad side, most of the industry is not yet growing digital and other revenue fast enough to cover print ad losses — and Times execs, in a conference call with analysts, concede that they don’t expect to do so again in the fourth quarter.
    3. Room to grow digital audience. The 44,000 quarter-to-quarter gain, the largest the company has recorded in several years, CEO Mark Thompson said, came mainly from new international customers and the “consumer education” sector (i.e. discounted subs to students). Thompson said that with improved marketing abroad he expects to continue growing that group of subscribers.
    4. Too expensive? The Times has raised print subscription prices this year, but the higher revenue per customer, chief financial officer James Follo said, was “outweighed by volume declines.” Daily print circulation was off 5.2 percent year-to-year and Sunday 3.2 percent. With the cost of a seven-day print subscription outside the New York metro area inching close to $1,000 a year, the Times may find renewals, new subscriptions (and newsstand copies) a tougher sell — especially as a range of much cheaper digital options are available.
    5. About those executive changes. Thompson had little to add to the announcement earlier this week that 26-year veteran Denise Warren was leaving the company after her chief digital officer job was split in two. But he did drop a hint, saying the Times would be looking for “an injection of specialized digital expertise.” Warren was an experienced and talented generalist who moved from overseeing advertising to the successful completion of the Times paywall strategy. But deeper digital roots may be needed in the executive suite for the next round of growth.
    6. Women in leadership. Warren’s is the third high-level executive departure in three years, following the firings of Thompson’s predecessor as CEO, Janet Robinson in December 2011, and Executive Editor Jill Abramson this May. The Times did add a woman in its top advertising job, hiring Meredith Kopit Levien away from Forbes in July 2013.
    7. Mobile advertising progress. Kopit Levien said mobile advertising is finally gaining some traction, accounting for about 10 percent of digital ad revenue. On the other hand it lags mobile audience which now accounts for more than 50 percent of the digital visits to Times’ sites and apps.
    8. Newsroom hiring. Thompson said he expected a modest wave of hiring following the well-publicized downsizing by 100 jobs. But as at many publications, the newly hired will have different job duties like audience development rather than traditional reporting and editing roles.
    9. Lower revenue per customer. Several questions and answers in the earnings conference call focused on so-called ARPU, jargon for average revenue per user (or unit). With the changing product mix, ARPU is falling at the Times, though Follo said by only about 5 percent year-to-year.

    That spotlights a huge financial challenge for the industry. As business moves down the price chain (both ads and circulation) from print to desktop/laptop to smartphone, a company can end up running fast just to stay even in revenues. And that’s likely to persist for years not just quarters.

    New York Times shares traded down about 5 percent at market close.

    Read more
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Galuski Battling Cancer
Written by Josh Cradduck   
Tuesday, 21 October 2014 11:38
 
UPDATE: Many have been wondering where Joe Galuski, a staple of 570 WSYR's programming lineup has been for the past 2 months. This morning, Galuski appeared on his own show with guest host Mark Wainwright and told his viewers that he has be...en battling cancer. The CNY broadcasting legend had previously dealt with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in 1992, he said. However, this re-occurence is more serious. Galuski thanked his many listeners for sending cards and well wishes, but admitted the listeners didn't know what they were sending cards for, as his absense had not been explained by WSYR radio. He decided to put speculation to rest. He will continue with chemotheraphy, he says. Joe has been in the business since 1975 and has hosted 570's morning show since 1998. The Press Club wishes Joe all the best!
 
NABET and WSYR-TV Reach Agreement
Written by Josh Cradduck   
Thursday, 18 September 2014 02:13
 
The NABET-CWA Local 211 WSYR Negotiation Committee has announced the ratification of a new 4-year agreement between NABET-CWA & WSYR-TV. "This contract could not have been accomplished without the support of the Central NY Labor Federation, CWA Local 1123, Local area politicians and the tremendous work of our committees as well as our dedicated membership at WSYR-TV," according to a statement issued late this evening by NABET.  
 
Cartwright Leaving WSYR-TV
Written by Josh Cradduck   
Monday, 15 September 2014 16:53

Another change in the local TV news landscape.

On the heels of Jeremy Ryan's appointment as ND at WKTV-TV in Utica, we have learned that WSYR-TV NewscChannel 9 news director Rob Cartwright is leaving the station for another job. Staffers were told last week. He joined the station in early 2012, taking over for Jim Tortora. Before his role as news director, Mr. Cartwright served as assistant news director KDAF in Dallas-Fort Worth.

No word yet on plans for a replacement.

 
Ryan Named WKTV News Director
Written by Josh Cradduck   
Tuesday, 09 September 2014 20:35

WKTV has landed it's future news director.

Jeremy Ryan will take over the role on September 22. Ryan most recently served as news resources manager at CNYCentral in Syracuse, where he coordinated assignments and supervised personnel.

Ryan is taking over for Steve McMurray, who was promoted in March to Vice President and General Manager.

He is a native of Central New York and has more than 16 years of experience in broadcasting. Ryan was a newscast director for the station from 1998 to 2001. He also worked for brief time at Time Warner Cable News as a newscast director.

Read more...
 
Summer 2014: Comings and Goings
Written by Josh Cradduck   
Thursday, 31 July 2014 22:03

 

Here is a brief look at some of the Comings and Goings from early-summer so far:

 

 

 

Congratulations to CNY-Central reporter KATIE CORRADO, who just headed to Connecticut to become FOXCT's weekend morning anchor/weekday morning reporter. Katie has been with the Syracuse NBC affiliate for two years. 

 

A big congratulations to CNY Central's BRIAN ERB, who has after 42 years at the station. Brian started at the NBC affiliate in November of 1971, making him one of the longest-serving photographers in the Syracuse market. We're told his retirement plans are to “kick back and enjoy his grandchildren.” Brian has been honored with dozens of awards over the years, including SPC Career Achievement in 2002.

 

Another veteran is leaving the media scene in CNY.  JOHN MARIANI has retired from the Post-Standard/Syracuse Media Group after a 32-year career. His long stint at the paper included reporting on government, neighborhoods, politics and business, as well as editing NewsLine.

 

See more by continuing this article. 

 

 

Last Updated ( Thursday, 31 July 2014 22:18 )
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"Journalism’s ultimate purpose [is] to inform the reader, to bring him each day a letter from home and never to permit the serving of special interests"
---Arthur Ochs Sulzberger, Publisher, NY Times

Wall of Distinction


A. Brohmann Roth

Herald-Journal / Herald American

Club President: 1975

A true newspaperman of the old school, even after Brohmann Roth became an assistant city editor and later a columnist, at heart he never forgot that he was first and foremost a reporter. He also never forgot his roots in Syracuse.

Read more...Link

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